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The Guy Who Really Knows Who's Naughty and Nice

Parting Observations From Bali's Chief of Police - Irjen Drs. Made Mangku Pastika.

(12/24/2005) 

Farewell, Pak Made

As reported on balidiscovery.com, [ Police Chief Pastika Moving to Jakarta?] it has now been officially confirmed that Irjen. Drs. Made Mangku Pastika will assume the top job in the National Police Squads Narcotic's Division on December 20, 2005.

Appointed to Chief of Police in April 2003, shortly after being named Asian Newsmaker of the Year by TIME Magazine for his universally-praised leadership of the international investigative team that cracked the October 12th bombing of two Bali nightspots, Pastika was promoted to Bali's Chief of Police post in late April 2003 and immediately thrust into handling complex security arrangements surrounding the trials of the more than 30 suspects accused of playing roles in the bombing.

During his more than 3.5 years at the top in Bali, Pastika has made improving general security, cracking down on all forms of organized gambling and battling the narcotics trade central themes of his law enforcement administration.

Affable and open to input and community cooperation in doing his job, Chief Pastika shunned many of the traditional VIP courtesies extended to his predecessors, abandoning personal police escorts and lavish facilities for his entourage when traveling around the island.

In a parting interview carried out by the Indonesian-language Bali Post, Chief Pastika called on the residents of Bali to work together to make sure the last paradise does not become the lost paradise. Acknowledging the inevitable onward march of "progress," the Chief, who was born in Buleleng, North Bali, urged that hotels and other developments not be completed at the cost of Bali's natural environment and should reflect Bali-Hindu values in their architectural designs.

In the same interview, Pastika left four tasks for his successor and the people of Bali. First, the crackdown on organized gambling must continue and the Balinese must be made aware of the long-term damage to society caused by allowing gambling to continue. Second, the Balinese people must strive to live more harmoniously, reducing the petty rivalries and arguments which have fomented warfare between local communities in the past. Third, Bali's natural environment must be protected and areas of the island dedicated to farming must be preserved. If tourists insist on staying in these "green" areas then accommodation should be made of wood and bamboo, allowing the main agricultural function of these areas to remain undisturbed. And, fourth, the people of Bali must avoid seeking to blame every problem of public order on "outsiders." If certain lucrative professions in Bali are gradually becoming dominated by non-Balinese, Chief Pastika urged more introspection by the local population who have been less than energetic in developing local skill pools.

Criminal and Intelligence Divisions Should be Combined

In a separate article in the Bali Post, Chief Pastika emphasized the central role played by the Police intelligence division in maintaining public order. Reflecting on his tenure in Bali, the General explained that one of the first changes he introduced when assuming the top law enforcement post in Bali was widening the capacities and roles played by intelligence officers. Over the past 3 years the number of officers assigned intelligence duties has increased from 65 to 120, making Bali intelligence division one of the nation's largest.

Chief Pastika said he will make recommendation to his successor and to the National Police Headquarters in Jakarta that the intelligence squad be consolidated with the criminal division in order to bring about an overall improvement in Bali's law enforcement.

Is Bali Safe?

Acknowledging that the war on terror is a long battle that must continue in the future, he saluted the efforts of the investigators of the first and second Bali bombings who have managed to throw terrorist networks into disarray. Since the formal announcement of the perpetrators of Bali Bomb II, 56 planned terrorist attacks have been uncovered and prevented and more than 200 terror suspects have been apprehended. "Now that the terrorist networks have been disabled, what remains is the capture of Noordin M. Top," explained Pastika, referring to the current hunt for the fugitive Malaysian mastermind of many of Indonesia's past terror attacks.

Chief Pastika underlined that the potential for future attacks does exists, demanding continued vigilance from local communities. In order to preserve public order over the coming Christmas and New Year periods, extra security is being deployed at churches and other public places with more than 6,000 officers deployed on active duty in Bali over the coming holydays.

Changes Ahead?

When approached by local reporters and asked on what changes Bali might expect from his successor - Brigadier General Soenarko Danu Ardanto, Pastika offered a small smile, explaining that while differences in "personal tastes" might exist between him and his successor, both men have a firm commitment to upholding the law. Explained Pastika: "A chief of police from Buleleng (North Bali) might like his food spicy hot mixed with sour tastes. The tastes of Yogyakarta (Central Java) tend to prefer sweetness. In the end, these are only differences in taste. I think police action against violators will remain the same."