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Garuda Load Factors Remain Stabile

Garuda Reports Normal Load Levels Despite the March 7th Yogyakarta Crash. Intercity Trains Experience Surge in Sales.

(3/17/2007) As recently reported on balidiscovery.com,[See: Adam Air Reaps a Bitter Apple], Indonesian low-cost air carrier Adam Air is suffering low-passenger counts on a number of its routes following a series of air mishaps, including the January 1, 2007 crash in which 102 people perished.

Apparently the flying-public is more prepared to forgive the national flag carrier Garuda Indonesia with the Indonesian-language Bisnis Indonesia reporting that the airline’s load factors remain above 85% despite the crash of a Garuda B-737-400 in Yogyakarta on March 7, 2007.

According to the Communication's Chief of Garuda, Pujobroto, there have been no cancellation or delay of flights by the airline that are connected with its recent air disaster in which 22 died.

Garuda's claims to the contrary, PT Kereta Api, who run inter-city trains in Java, told the press that bookings on its business and executive class services have increased 10% following the March 7th air crash. The chief of public relations for the rail system, Akhmad Sujadi, reports that the biggest increase in rail passengers has occurred on the Jakarata-Yogyakarta, Bandung-Yogyakarta, Jakarta-Solo, and the Jakarta-Semarang routes.

Efforts to unravel the cause of the Yogyakarta crash are still underway with surviving passengers and crew being interviewed by police and national transportation safety personnel. The back box of the ill-fated B737-400 that was originally sent to Australia for detailed analysis has now been sent to the Boeing factory in Seattle (USA) after Australian investigators determined the flight-recorder-device was too badly damaged for analysis in Australia.