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Peace and Quiet to Reign on Bali's Party Strip?

Officials Confirm Jalan Abimanyu Bars and Restaurants are Breaking Local Noise Laws and are Not Licensed to Conduct Late Night Musical Events.

(7/21/2007) As reported in balidiscovery.com [All Night Long], local residents and accommodation providers along Bali's hard-partying Jalan Abimanyu ( a/k/a Jalan Dyanapura) have been complaining bitterly about the noise pollution emanating from dance and music clubs in Bali's night spot Mecca.

In a developing story, the Indonesian-language Bali Post reports that a meeting between Seminyak village elders and local business operators has yielded an agreement from the bar and restaurants on Jalan Abimanyu to tone down their noise and abide by local laws and regulations.

The agreement, reached at a meeting attended by 25 business operators, was announced on Tuesday, July 10, 2007, by the village chief of Seminyak, Wayan Parek, and the head of the neighbourhood association protesting the noise, Made Sukadana.

Investigations carried out by village officials have discovered that most of the business operating on Jalan Abimanyu only hold simple licenses to operate as bars and restaurants, prohibiting the high-spirited revelry running until the wee hours that precipitated the complaints from local residents and accommodation operators.

"There are no permits for holding musical performances or operating discothèques," explained Parek. Current regulation therefore only permit music to be played to accompany customers dining at the local businesses and strictly prohibit such music from being played at high noise levels to the extent they are heard outside the business premises.

Sukadana, who lead the community protests that prompted the crackdown, pledged to organize local residents to continually monitor businesses operating on the street to ensure the latest promise was not mere lip service.

A Documented Din

Separately, a team from the Environmental Health Unit of Bali's Health Department confirmed that recent sound tests conducted along the road discovered a bar producing noise levels registering 72 decibels at a distance of 100 meters from the business. Those tests, conducted on July 2, 2007, revealed two bars violating local law emitting sound levels of between 72 and 85 decibels, much higher than the legal limit of 45 decibels.

The health official urged that sound monitoring be undertaken on a regular basis to avert the psychological damage and potential hearing loss that can result from prolonged exposure to loud noise.