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East Java Volcano Disrupts Bali Flights

International Flights to Bali Diverted, Cancelled or Delayed Due to Eruption of Bromo Volcano.

(1/29/2011) A number of inbound flights to Bali were cancelled or diverted on Thursday and Friday, January 27 and 28, 2011, due to volcanic ash suspended in the atmosphere following the most recent explosion of Mount Bromo volcano in East Java.

Among the airline whose international flights were affected were Cathay Pacific, Virgin Blue, Jetstar, Value Air and Singapore Airlines.

Most domestic flight to and from Bali continued to operate but with some delays as pilots steered courses well clear of areas with concentrations of volcanic ash in the atmosphere.

Following the Thursday eruption, the Director General of Civil Aviation, Herry Bakti Singayuda Gumay, said that airlines need not fear flying to Bali, "we have coordinated with the Meteorology, Climatology and Geophysical Agency (BMKG) and they have stated that the emissions of volcanic ask from Mount Bromo does not pose a threat to aviation."

The Indonesian aviation authorities have issued a Notice to Airman (NOTAM) stating that volcanic dust was in the atmosphere to a distance up to 200 nautical miles form Mt. Bromo and at a height of 18,000 feet. The notice warned pilots to exercise caution when flying in proximity of the active volcanic mountain.

The Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC) reported on Saturday, January 29, 2011, that Virgin Blue and Jetstar planned to resume flights based on information provided by the Darwin Volcanic Ash Advisory Center indicating the the ash was dispersing and no longer posed a major threat to aviation.

Authorities, however, continue to monitor the situation for any new developments.