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Bali's Rising Oceans

Is Bali Threatened by Global Change and Rising Sea Levels?

(5/14/2011) The Bali Environmental Agency (BLH) has revealed that research, based on observations over the past 100 years, show  the world's ocean levels have increased 7 centimeters, including the seas surrounding Bali.

The head of the BLH in Bali, Anak Agung Gede Sastrawan, warned rising seas will threaten many parts of Bali over the coming decades. Saying he had forgotten the specific measurements, but insisted Bali's oceans are rising rapidly. Sastrawan said: "If we compare with last year and the year before that, it's clearly higher. The exact figure I have forgotten. What's clear is that the oceans are rising."

Quoted by VIVAnews, proof of the rising seas is proven by the abrasion and erosion occurring along almost every beach in Bali. He blames the rising seas on changing global climate conditions and the rapid melting of the arctic ice pack.

Sastrawan elaborated: "Let's now talk about drowning yet, that hasn't happened. So, at this point we need to avoid the negative impact of rising oceans with steps that can be taken to prevent these things from happening."

Separately, the head of the data and information from the Bali Meteorology, Climate and Geophysics Department (BKMG), Endro Tjahono, has conducted inspections of Bali's dams, levees, lakes and rivers. His office is also working with the Japanese government to prepare a disaster vulnerability map for Bali.

Said Tjahono: "This survey has been performed to understand the real potential for Bali  'sinking' beneath rising seas. In order to meet the challenges of sinking, the Japanese and the BKMG continue to conduct research."