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A Liquidity Crisis

Baliís Growing Crisis of Water: Village of Pemuteran in Northwest Bali Facing Severe Water Shortage.

(8/22/2011) NusaBali reports that residents in and surrounding of the village of Pemuteran in northwest Bali are compelled to take fewer baths due to the high cost fresh water.

For more than a month the cost of one tank of fresh water has risen to Rp. 100,000 –Rp. 125,000(US$11.40-US$14.20).

As a result, local residents accustomed to bathing at least twice a day are now taking a bath only once every three days. Some residents told the press that they are bathing only once every 5 days.

Jro Mangku Salya who shares a single residence with three families comprising 8 people is able to purchase water only once every 20 days due to the high price of water. Salya said water has been in short supply for the past 3-4 months when his local holding tank went dry.

He will normally by two tanks of water each month, a necessity in a village with no piped water supply or general reservoir.

A farmer, Salya must buy water on credit while waiting for his crops to come to harvest.

Another farmer, I Komang Sukadi, who lives in a household of 5 individuals and keeps 15 cows,  needs large amounts of water. “I buy a tank of water once every 10 days. In a month I buy water three times. I’ve been doing this for the past month,” he said.

Sukadi complained that in a month he is working only to have sufficient cash to purchase water.

The cost of water in Pemuteran has increased from Rp. 80,000 a tank in 2008 to a price of between Rp. 100,000 and Rp. 125,000 in 2011.
Pemuteran is the home to 415 family units, all facing an unprecedented shortage of water, where livelihoods are largely dependent on agriculture.