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There Ought to be a Law!

PLN Wants Bali to Pass Laws Controlling Kite Flying Activities

(8/10/2012) The State Electrical Board (PLN) is recommending to the provincial government of Bali that local regulations be urgently formulated addressing kite flying.

The proposed regulations, according to PLN, should contain rules covering specific locations in which kite flying is allowed and limitations on maximum height permitted for kite flying.

According to Beritabali.com, the regulations urged by PLN are needed to end the frequent power outages caused by kites that get entangled on power lines and transformers.

The area manager for execution and maintenance for PLN in Bali, Wayan Bujana, said that between 2006 and 2010 there have been 5 instances of total blackouts in Bali, 3 of which are linked to short circuits caused by errant kites.

An island-wide electrical blackout in Bali can cause financial losses estimated to be as much as Rp. 8 billion (US$860,000). This figure does not include damage to equipment caused by power failures.

Wayan Bujana said the proposed regulations should also contain laws forbidding people leaving their kites unattended overnight. Kites held to the earth with wooden or steel stakes, but without human supervision, are frequently linked to catastrophic results when the kites crash to the earth during the evening hours.

Bali has an existing Kite Flying regulation passed in 2000 stipulating the altitude and proximity of kite flying near the traffic patterns of Bali’s Ngurah Rai International Airport.

[Don’t Go Fly a Kite!]

[Yikes! Watch out for Kites!]