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A Menagerie Most Unsatisfactory

Japanese Villa Occupant in Bali Caught with Collection of Rare and Endangered Animals

(3/29/2013) The criminal division of the Bali police has confiscated 5 endangered animals from the Japanese occupant of Vila Pasti in Peranca Village, Jembrana, West Bali on Friday, March 22, 2013.

According to Kompas.com, the five animals taken into custody include 2 estuarine crocodiles, 1 sulfur-crested cockatoo, 1 orange-crested cockatoo and 1 peacock. According to police, one of the crocodiles was dead and had been preserved.

The illegal collection of animals were in the possession of a Japanese national, Maruo Tokashi, aged 46, who works as the marketing manager for the villa complex.

The head of the police crime unit, Tri Kuncoro, told a press conference on Monday, March 25, 2013, “The team has secured the subject animals because we believe they are all endangered and facing extinction due to their inclusion in appendix 1 of the CITES.”

CITES is the United Nations treaty first established in 1973- an acronym for the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species.

Police continue to question the occupant of the villa, a Japanese man from whom police are trying to determine how he acquired the collection. The manager of the villa and the Japanese insist they were given the animals by a person whose identity they do not know.

Police say the Japanese cared for the animals out of affection for the animals, but they are investigsating further to determine if the animals were being kept to display to guests at the villa as a means to increase visitors.
The endangered animals will be handed over the Bali Natural Resources Department (BKSDA).

If police and prosecutors decide to prosecute the Japanese he could face up to five years in prison and fined up to US$5,000 for keeping an illegal collection of endangered animals.