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Bali News by Bali Update
BALI UPDATE #1067 - 13 February 2017

IN THIS UPDATE


Lost at Sea
Russian Diver Missing Off Padangbai, East Bali

A Russian citizen, Sergiv  J Klambin (46), disappeared while diving at Bias Tugel, Padangbai, East Bali.

The Russian failed to return following a dive on Thursday, February 9, 2017, with search and rescue workers theorizing the man was swept away by strong currents in the area.

Meanwhile, local fishermen working near Wates, Karangasem told police they spotted a floating corpse in the area late on Thursday. Search efforts have been expanded to include the area of the reported sighting.

Fishermen told police that strong currents and waves defeated their efforts to retrieve the body.

It is presumed that Sergiv was snorkeling  without a companion at the time of his disappearance.

Radarbali.com reports that the Russian was holidaying in the Padangbai area with his wife and child at the time of his disappearance.

Search efforts continue.


Bali Police HQ on Security Lock Down
Bali Provincial Police Headquarters Placed Under Heavy Security Presence.

Bali Post reports that following the arrest of two ForBALI activists from the anti-reclamation protest movement, the entrance to Bali Police Headquarters in downtown Denpasar is under armed guard by tens of officers drawn from a combined force of several branches of the Bali Police.

Taken into custody were two ForBALI members I Made Joni Antara, also known as De Jhon, and I Gusti Putu Dharmawijaya.

Access to the Police Headquarters’ grounds was being restricted. At about 5:00 pm on Friday evening, a team of lawyers representing the two men, including ForBALI leader Wayan "Gendo" Suardana, were seen leaving the police headquarters.

The head of the East Denpasar Police Precinct, Putu Indrajaya, said that he did not know if ForBALI demonstrations were planned in connection with the arrests, but added, "we're prepared."

(Photo: Bali Post)

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Under Arrest
Two ForBALI Activist Detained as Police Try to Determine Who Raised and Lowered a Flag at the DPRD-Bali on August 26, 2016

Bali Post reports that the continuing criminal investigation involving the lowering of the Indonesia National Flag at the Bali House of Representatives (DPRD-Bali) on August 26, 2016, has resulted in the arrest of two ForBALI activists on Friday, February 10, 2017.

Named as suspects in a criminal proceeding and taken into custody were members I Made Joni Antara, also known as De Jhon, and I Gusti Putu Dharmawijaya, also known as Gung Tu or Omlet.

Police took the two into custody for additional questioning in preparation to handing the case over to State Prosecutors for trial.

The two men were accompanied at police headquarters by a team of 14 lawyers.

The head of the ForBALI legal defense team, Made Ariel Suardana, said: “I just got a report that they were arrested. I will undertake the next steps.”

Suardana added that the two ForBALI members were being interrogated separately and asked to answer 15 questions posed by police investigators. Adding: “The point of the questions is whether they collaborated together in their action? In addition, (they are being asked) if they were aware that their actions were criminal in nature? Did they commit the act with purposeful intent? They answered all the question clearly and easily.”

Police are trying to seek further clarification on questions posed to the two men in past interviews. Investigators are focusing on trying to determine who was the person who lowered the Indonesian flag at the DPRD-Bali in August 2016. Suardana told the press that someone else lowered the flag and who that person remained unclear.

The statements made by the men and witnesses suggest that the person who lowered the Indonesian flag was not from ForBALI, but another individual wearing a black shirt and black trousers. Suardana explained that this was the scenario revealed in a video recording shown to him by the police.

The two men under police arrest told investigators that their action on August 26th was spontaneous in nature. The raising of the ForBALI flag suspended under the Indonesian flag involved a large number of people, with Gun Tu holding only one of three flag lines. Meanwhile, De Jhon said he only tied the flag line to the flagpole.

Police continue trying to determine who it was that lowered the Indonesian flag that preceded the placement of the ForBALI flag on the Parliament’s flagpole.

Suardana said the police believe that those who place the ForBALI banner under the Indonesian flag on the DPRD flagpole are guilty of disrespect for the National Flag. In response, De Jhon that the whatever happened was done in a spirit of Indonesian nationalism. Moreover, he insisted to police that he was not the person who lowered the Indonesian flag and installed the ForBALI flag, De Jhon told police he arrived late at the DPRD-Bali and came to the flagpole in search of his friends.

A police spokesman said the men were taken into custody to allow additional questioning and the final preparation of the case file before it is handed over to prosecutors.

Photo: Bali Post: ForBALI activist I Made Joni Antara, also known as De Jhon, and I Gusti Putu Dharmawijaya, also known as Gung Tu, undergoing police interrogation.

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13 Deaths in Bangli
Landslides in three locations in the regency of Bangli are blamed for 13 deaths.

Balipost.com reports that the first of three landslides that claimed 13 lives occurred at Banjar Bantas in the village of Songan, Kintamani in the early hours of Friday, February 10, 2017, where seven people were buried alive and killed by torrents of mud sweeping over the community. The tragedy took place at 1:30 am while villagers were asleep during a heavy rainstorm.

The seven deaths at Songan were comprised of 5 adults, one child and a one-year-old infant. Meanwhile, two teenage boys, aged 17 and 14, suffered serious injuries requiring hospitalization in Bangli.

A retaining wall collapsed sending mud onto 5 homes situated in the village. Two of the five homes were completely leveled by the landslide with the remaining three buildings suffering significant damage.

In addition to the seven killed in the mudslide, two others suffered serious injuries with seven more light wounds.

The dead and injured were all evacuated from the scene by 9:00 am on Friday morning.

The landslide also closed access roads to the village and surrounding areas.

Later the same morning, two additional landslides took place at the villages of Awan and Sukawana. At Awan four people lost their lives while one person died in the village of Sukawana. In Awan 3 adults and one ten-year-old girl were killed. The landslide in Sukawana resulted in one adult death and serious injuries to a child.

Four days after the initial landslide, the body of a 70-year-old woman was discovered buried in mud and rubble at the village of Subaya in Bangli bringing the total death count to 13 people.



Taps for your Tap?
Most Parts of Bali’s Capital Without Tap Water

Many of the residents of Bali’s capital city of Denpasar found themselves without water starting on Wednesday, February 8, 2017, when the Blusung Water Pumping and Processing Station was forced to halt operations due to the

NusaBali reports that recent flash floods along the Ayung River caused the Denpasar Water Board (PDAM Denpasar) to temporarily halt water production. Water from the river has become so muddied that its sedimentation is rated at 80%, leaving a meager 20% that can still be called "water."

The Director of PDAM-Denpasar, IB Gede Arsana, said on Wednesday, February 8, 2017, flash flooding in the village of Pancasari, Buleleng brought mudslides into the river system that feeds the Ayung River.

As a result, the Ayung River has experienced high sedimentation and silting, forcing the Ayung Belusung Water Plant to reduce its level of water production. Officials say the intake water now ranks at 18,000 Nephelometric Turbidity Units (NTU) – a level considered too concentrated for the production of water.

“With air having a turbidity of 80% it becomes very dense with only 20% contains water, there’s not much that we can do. All we can do it wait for the water to have lower mud content. At that point, we can turn the filtration machines back on. Right now, the machines are clogged by the mud,” explained Arsana.

He said the floodwaters not only brought mud down the river but also has swept trees and trash that clog the water intake channels.

Officials are now predicting that the intake water will only return at the earliest on perhaps February 11, 2017, depending on the weather and the developing state of the water on the Ayung River,

Meanwhile, PDAM officials have dispatched three water trucks to carry water to consumers – an armada critically insufficient to assist the thousands of homes with no running water.

Officials say the turbidity rates on Wednesday, February 8, 2017, continued to increase.

Worst affected by the lack of water are the areas of West Denpasar, North Denpasar, and East Denpasar.

While apologizing to the public for the current situation, PDAM-Denpasar officials are hopeful that water service can return by February 10 or 11, 2017.

However, by late on Sunday, February 12, 2017, water service had yet to be fully restored in part of Denpasar.



Roads Less Traveled Because of Mud
Continuing Rains and Landslide Disrupting Roads and Communities Across Bali

Heavy rains that precipitated landslides temporary closed the road connecting Denpasar and Singaraja from 9:00 pm on Friday, February 10, 2017, until 4:00 am the following morning.

As reported by RadarBali.com, long lines of traffic result on both the north and south side of the landslide that occurred near Candi Kuning on the main road connecting Denpasar and the former capital of Bali, Singaraja.

To keep the road open and respond to new landslides as they occurred members of the Public Works Department, Disaster Mitigation Agency, and police were deployed and placed on standby at strategic locations.

One official said the biggest component of materials clogging the roads was trash that washed down from the roads and ditches.

Three fire trucks were also deployed to use their water hoses to wash away accumulations of mud that had closed roads.

Wide Area of Bali Affected by Mudslides and Flooding

Tabanan officials said the areas suffering most from mudslides were located at Baturiti, Pupuan, Penebel and Selemadeg.

In the Badung Regency mudslides were reported at Sekarmukti, Beloksidan and Petang.

Mudslide also closed temporarily Jalan Semanik in Petang.

In Denpasar the Oongan Dam on the Ayung River at Jalan Saraswati overflowed and submerged five homes in the surrounding area in water and mud to a depth of one meter from midnight on Friday until 3:00 on Saturday, February 11, 2017. 


Taking a Bashing at the Baths
Bali’s North Shore Line and Air Sanih Public Baths Taking a Beating from High Waves and Winds

High waves on the north shore of Bali at the regency of Buleleng have caused massive erosion along the coastline.

As reported by RadarBali.com, large sections of shoreline have been washed away. The road leading the Kayubuntil Cemetery has been washed out and the fishing pier at Sangsit has suffered substantial damage.

all surrounding the popular Air Sanih Seaside Public Pool has also been partially washed away by the large waves hitting the Island’s north shore.

In fact, large waves have been causing damage to the seawall at Air Sanih for several months with the facility now in danger of closing due to a large 50-meter long breach of the swimming pool’s protective seawall. Large amounts of mud and trash have been washed into the adjoining swimming pools by the heavy seas.

The protective seawall is located only 10 meters from the edge of the actual swimming pool. And, while the pool itself has not suffered any damage, the missing seawall is allowing seawater, mud and trash to wash into the swimming area.

As a result, staff working at the pool must undertake a large clean up of the pool each morning before Air Sanih can open to the public. 


Missing Korean in Kuta
Body of Missing South Korean Found on Kuta Beach 36-hours After Disappearing During Evening Swim

The body of a South Korean, who disappeared while snorkeling off Kuta Beach on Wednesday, February 8, 2016, at 6:00 pm  has been discovered after 36-hours, on early Friday morning at 5:30 am washed ashore near the Segara Temple.

NusaBali reports that Kim Jung Chul (58), was last seen alive snorkeling in the ocean opposite the Kuta Beachwalk Mall on Wednesday at sunset.

Rescue workers theorize the man, who worked as a minister of religion in South Korea, was carried away by a strong current while swimming with his wife, Lee Song Jo, and a colleague, Kim Tae Min.

The three were swimming 100 meters from shore. After coming ashore for a brief rest, Kim Jung Chul returned to the water while his wife and companions waited on shore. When the man did not return to shore an alarm was raised and a search commenced.

Kim's body was sent to Bali's Sanglah General Hospital for forensic examination and final disposition bby his family.



Branding the Sacred and Profane
Bali Adopts “Island of the Gods” as its Official Branding to Replace “Shanti, Shanti, Shanti”

The Bali Provincial Tourism Service (Dinas Pariwisata) continues to discuss a preferred branding for Bali, a discussion that has gone on for more than 2 years.

A dialogue hat has involved more than 100 tourism leaders and cultural experts have produced the branding of “The Island of the Gods.”

As reported by Balipost.com, the branding of “The Island of the Gods” has been presented to Bali’s Governor Made Mangku Pastika and will eventually be forwarded to the Ministry of Tourism in Jakarta to replace the current official branding of “Shanti, Shanti, Shanti.”

The Central Government has decreed that all tourism destinations within Indonesia must adopt an “official branding” that can be used in promoting national tourism.

The national tourism branding is currently “Wonderful Indonesia.”

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Bali Hotels with Heart
Bali Hoteliers Reach Out to Assist More than 700 Bali Orphans

The Bali Hotels Association (BHA) representing more than 100 hotels offering more than 15,000 rooms and employing more than 30,000 employees has recorded another busy year of welcoming foreign and domestic tourists and reaching out to make a practical difference in the lives of the Balinese people.

Seeking to support and facilitate the development of local communities, education and environmental conservation in Bali, the BHA focused on assisting local orphanages in Bali in 2016.

The group’s Orphanage Charity Project was first initiated in 2008 to support worthy organization in the nine regencies of Bali. The project’s primary objective is to ensure underprivileged children are educated and well cared for in nurturing home environments. BHA hopes that this will result in children who are raised as healthy, skilled and independent individual who will eventually go on to become productive members of local society.

When first launched, BHA gathered the names of 50 different orphanages across Bali. This list was in turn prioritized to determine those most in need with donations prioritized to these facilities.

Each year the list is re-evaluated and currently BHA chooses to support orphanages in Singaraja, Negara, Bangli, Karangasem and Tabanan.

“The Orphanage Charity Project has grown so much since it started back in 2008 and we are so grateful for all the support given by our members this year,” said Virginie Tutin Sandstrom, the director of Community Relations & Charity and also general manager of Harris Kuta Beach Hotel. “We collected linens, bed sheets, towels, pillows, clothes, toiletries as well as schoolbooks and food supplies from our associates and donated these items to the orphanages on our list.”

Under Virginie’s direction and with the support of 30 hotel members, BHA in 2016 collected donations that were distributed to a record 14 orphanages serving 729 children.

Sandtrom added: “If a member (hotel) or even another organization wishes to adopt one of these orphanages under their own program, BHA can assist by sending them all the relevant information. This involves setting up a schedule for a site visit to better understand the actual needs of the orphanage. As every orphanage home facility is different, it is essential to identify specific requirements through a preliminary visit.”

As part of its ongoing community outreach program, BHA recently signed up with D Network to help people with disabilities (PWD) by creating job placements.

“The law states that each hotel has to employ at least one PWD per 100 employees. We have encouraged our members to enforce this regulation and so far there has been an extremely positive response. We are happy to report that we have assisted with a number of PWD work placements at hotels and resorts under the BHA banner,” explained Virginie.


Garuda to Axe Agent Commissions
Indonesian Travel Agents Threaten to Boycott Garuda Indonesia Airlines

The Jakarta Post reports that the Indonesian Tour and Travel Agents Association (ASITA) is threatening an organization-wide boycott of the Indonesian national flag carrier Garuda Indonesia in retaliation for plans to reduce commission levels paid by the airline to travel agencies.

The national chairman of ASITA, Asnawi Bahar, revealed that Garuda Indonesia has announced its intentions to reduce the commission paid to travel agents from 7 to 5 percent on international flights and from 5 to 3 percent on domestic flights.

Travel agents are also subject to a 1 percent VAT tax on airline ticket sales further reducing their profit yield on airline tickets they sell.

“We will boycott Garuda nationally because it wants to decrease the commission significantly. It’s already very hard for agents with the current competition with online travel agents,” said Bahar in a phone interview with The Jakarta Post.

Separate notes of protest are planned to be delivered by ASITA to the government.


Bali’s Diminishing Role as an International Air Gateway
Garuda Indonesia to Start Direct Flights Between Guangzhou, China and Lombok

Metrobali.com quotes the general manager of Garuda Indonesia Airlines in Mataram, Lombok, Machammad Yanusuerio, who has announced that in the near future the Indonesian national carrier will operate direct flights between Lombok and Guangzhou, China.

Following a meeting with the governor of Nusa Tenggara Barat (NTB), Zainul Majid, on Friday, February 2, 2017, Yanusuerio said: “Lombok and Sumbawa are becoming increasingly well known both on a national and international level. This fact was considered in adding new flights on a number of routes, one of which is Lombok to Guangzhou.”

“The Frequency will be twice a week,” he added.

The Lombok manager for Garuda also revealed that the Airline will also increase flight frequencies on domestic routes between Yogyakarta to Lombok and Makassar to Lombok from once a week to twice a week.

He also said that Garuda Indonesia routes between Lombok and Surabaya and Lombok and Jakarta were operating at occupancy rates of between 80-85% and this  has cleared the way for added flight frequencies in the near future.


Unfinished Business with a Finnish Female
Police and Immigration Officials Seeking Finnish Female Tourist Suspected of Mental Disorder

A Finnish woman, Tila Johanna Kivinen, escaped protective custody by Indonesian immigration authorities that were in the process of placing the woman on a plane for deportation.

The woman, who lists her profession as a nurse, was taken into by Indonesian immigration officers for creating a public nuisance in the Ahmed area of Karangasem, northeast Bali. Authorities suggest that the 30-year-old woman is mentally troubled and was in the process of being sent back home to Finland. She had overstayed her visa and was no longer able to present a passport when asked to do so by officials.

Kompas.com reports that Kivinen fought with immigration officers and escaped their custody at Bali’s Ngurah Rai Airport on Wednesday, February 8, 2017.

Efforts by immigration officers, police and the Finish Consulate in Bali to determine the whereabouts of the woman have been unsuccessful.

Immigration officials say the woman, who was in Bali studying Yoga, had caused disturbances in North Bali by refusing to pay for meals or accommodation.

Kivinen (pictured) is described as being 165 centimeters tall, blonde and has a wound on the right thigh. Anyone seeing this woman should report her whereabouts to police who are concerned for her safety.

The woman’s visa has expired and she is now staying in Indonesia illegally.


Ending a Tragic Shell Game in Bali
Chief of Police Seeks Widespread Support in Battling Illegal Turtle Trade

7 green turtles (Chelonia mydas) seized by Bali Police were released back into the ocean on Kuta Beach on Tuesday, February 7, 2017, in an activity witnessed by the Chief of the Bali Police, General Petrus Reinhard Golose, and members of local environmental groups.

Also watching the release of the turtles were a large group of local tourists, some of whom joined in the activity of hoisting the reptiles back into the surf.

As reported by Beritabali.com, General Golose thanked the Bali Water Police (Polisi Air) for managing to save the turtles confiscated from local traders.

“They (the turtle smugglers) generally haul turtles in small numbers (10 or less) in order to ease the sales process. If they get caught, their losses are limited,” explained the Provincial Chief of Police. Continuing, Galose told how the turtles are sent directly to people who prepare turtle meat for human consumption.

“Another method,” explained Golose, “the turtle meat is sent after it has been butchered; a popular method that is hard to detect. The meat is placed in small packets and sent on buses making it very hard to find.”

The Police Chief described the recent seizure of turtles by Water Police as “only the tip of the iceberg,” in terms of the size of the illegal trade in turtles actually taking place in Bali and the rest of Indonesia.

General Golose called for public and official support in assisting the police to eliminate the trade in turtles that endangers the green turtle species.


Wouldn’t it be Lovely?
Bali Governor Thinks ‘Lovely Bali’ a Better Branding for Bali Tourism than ‘Bali, Island of the Gods.”

While tourism destinations around the world tend to hire marketing experts to develop branding programs and strategies, Bali prefers to leave its branding work to tourism stakeholders, local academics, and government professionals to come up with tourism slogans and bylines to share with the world.

The last effort to come up with an effective resulted in the somewhat esoteric “Shanti, Shanti, Shanti” program that was accompanied by a cryptic symbol incorporating ancient Balinese script incomprehensible to most modern-day Balinese.

In response to a request by the Ministry of Tourism that each domestic destination in Indonesia must now have its own distinct branding, many of the same stakeholders who advanced the now disfavored “Shanti, Shanti, Shanti” campaign were reconvened to participate in a prolonged dialogue in order to come up with a new tourism catchphrase.

The ensuing multi-year deliberation process produced Bali’s new marketing slogan of “Bali, Island of the Gods” that has now been sent to the Tourism Ministry in Jakarta for final certification as the "official branding" for Bali tourism.

Meanwhile, the State News Agency Antara now reports that Bali’s Governor Made Mangku Pastika thinks the Island’s tourism industry can come up with something better than “Bali, Island of the Gods” as a branding campaign.
Lovely Bali

Lovely Bali

In Governor Pastika’s opinion, Bali would be better served if it adopted “Lovely Bali” as its tourism mantra.

“Why not ‘Lovely Bali,’ for instance,” asked the Governor. “What’s more fantastic than love? There isn’t anything, is there? If there’s love, then everything is beautiful. If it’s hate then everything is ugly.” The Governor was speaking to the press after attending a plenary session of the Bali House of Representatives (DPRD-Bali).

The Governor told the press that “Lovely Bali” would prove a more interesting branding, especially given the popularity of Bali as a wedding destination. Arguing: “Why (do people want to marry in Bali)? Because Bali is lovely and we must accept that this is an island filled with love.”

The Governor told the press that he did not have any precise information of the recommendation of Bali travel industry stakeholder for a new branding of “Bali, The Island of the Gods” that has been recently forwarded to the Ministry of Tourism in Jakarta by the Provincial Tourism Service.

“In my opinion, the branding should not be: ‘The Island of the Gods.’ I will summon them (tourism officials), branding can’t be done arbitrarily,” said Pastika.

The Governor said he viewed branding as a very important part of tourism promotion. In addition to branding, he said two other important areas of tourism marketing are segmentation of the market that is being pursued through a branding campaign and the differentiation of the product through positioning strategies.

Meanwhile, in seeming contradiction to the Governor, the head of the Provincial Tourism Authority (Kadiparda), Gede Yuniartha Putra, stated separately that the proposed new branding of “Bali, The Island of the Gods” was sent to the Ministry of Tourism in Jakarta on February 3, 2017.

“This branding has been decided with all stakeholders, academic leaders and cultural experts in Bali – making it a Bali decision,” said Yuniartha. Moreover, Yuniartha defended the “Island of the Gods” branding as a slogan given to Bali over the years by foreign visitors to the Island.

Continuing, Yuniartha said: “Before, we had the branding ‘Shanti, Shanti, Shanti’ - that didn’t fit well with ‘Wonderful Indonesia,’ causing us to renew our branding.”

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Once Bitten, Long Regretted
Deman Berdarah Cases Reported at Record Highs In Bali

The Municipal Government of Denpasar, Bali is increasing its efforts to reduce an anticipated sudden increase in the number of cases of hemorrhagic fever or Deman Berdarah (DB) that typically follows Bali’s rainy season.

As reported by the State News Agency Antara, the head of the Denpasar Health Department, Dr. Luh Putu Sri Armini on Monday, February 6, 2017, said that a number of steps have been taken by Denpasar including the establishment of a movement for the observation and control of mosquito nesting (Gema Petik).

The Gema Petik Movement involves some 17,000 family members in Bali recruited from every neighborhood in tracking down and elimination of mosquito nesting areas in cooperation with officials of the government.

To reduce the number of Deman Berdarah (DB) cases, the Denpasar Department of Health is intensifying the eradication of mosquito nesting areas through a program of mass fogging that took place in November and December.

Despite steps to reduce new cases of Deman Berdarah, Sir Armini revealed that the number of cases reported in December 2016 increased to 2,851 from the 1,576 cases reported in December 2015. This increase in DB cases mirrored similar increases in cases of the disease in all areas of Bali.

In fact, Denpasar ranks only 7th among all provinces of Bali in terms of reported DB cases.

Sri Armini called on the public to guard the hygiene of their homes and surrounding living space and avoid dangerous reservoirs or repositories of water that can become nesting areas for infectious mosquitoes.


Pupuan is Passable
Pupuan Road Connecting South and North Bali Reported Free of Mudslides with Traffic Said to be Moving Smoothly

With widespread flooding, landslides and roadway washouts reported on the road connecting Denpasar to the northern capital of Singaraja, Balipost.com has signaled that the Pupuan highway remains free of obstructions affording a smooth passage between Bali’s north and south.

Heavy rains that have caused trees to fall, mudslides and collapse paving on the road to Singaraja through Bedugul on Saturday, February 11, 2017, did not have similar effects on the scenic and winding Pupuan Road that remains open for traffic.

The District Chief (Camat) of Pupuan, Hendra Manik, announce the roadway was unimpeded, denying as “irresponsible” reports on social media that the Pupuan Road had suffered mudslides.

Manik checked the road condition personally and pronounced: “the road is still safe to use.” Manik’s appraisal was confirmed by a member of the Tabanan House of Representatives (DPRD-Tabanan), Omar Dani, who lives in Pupuan, affirming the road was open and safe for traffic for those desiring to travel between Singaraja and Denpasar.


Sunday Convulsions
Mid Day Sunday Earthquake Felt in Bali on February 12, 2016

A 5.2 Richter Scale earthquake struck off the coast of Klungkung, East Bali at approximately 12:30 pm on Sunday, February 12, 2017.

Shaking homes and offices across Bali for a few seconds, many people, particularly in Klungkung, panicked by running onto local streets.

The epicenter of the earthquake was located 111 kilometers southeast of Klungkung and 126 kilometers southeast of Denpasar at a depth of 10 kilometers.

No tsunami event was linked to the earthquake. Also, no injuries or property damage were reported in connection with the seismic event.

The earthquake was felt in Nusa Dua, Denpasar, Sanur, Gianyar, Tabanan and Klungkung

In Sanur the shake lasted only a few seconds but shook windows and furniture in many homes.


Is Bali Ungovernable?
Governor Says that the Need for ‘One Island Management’ in Bali is an Idea Well Before its Time

The State News Agency Antara reports that Governor Made Mangku Pastika remains pessimistic that “One Island Management” can ever be achieved for Bali without some fundamental change in national politics.

“’One Island Management’ is a holistic approach and requires a change in the laws as well as the political situation in the country,” said Pastika in a meet and greet session with members of the Island’s tourism industry and the general public on Saturday, February 11, 2017.

The Governor predicted that it will take 10-25 years and that, even then, it remains uncertain if the political condition in the Country can change in that period of time. This is connected with the establishment of regional autonomy in Indonesia as a national political platform.

“So things will remain as they are. If we remain in this condition the ‘One Island Management’ remains pie in the sky, a concept too advanced,” said Pastika when quizzed by a member of the audience on the concept.

Because of this, he cautioned, it is best for Bali to simply focus on policies that remain within its power to perform. “Don’t talk about regencies, you can’t. I have tried for 10 years as Governor without success. Because of this, let's just do what we can in a piecemeal way on a provincial level,” said the Governor.

Pastika admitted that he couldn’t discuss matters touching on the power and authorities of the Regents and mayor of Denpasar because each has their own interpretation of the public welfare. The Governor said that in all of Bali, the Regency of Badung profits most from tourism.

Pastika lamented: “(In their view), the Regents and Mayor look only to tourism to improve the welfare of the people. The race to develop tourism. You can’t even try to force them to develop agriculture.”

As Pastika draws to the end of his second term as Governor, he said whoever replaces him will find it impossible to change the current situation given the state of national politics.

“The theory is easy, but in practice it’s impossible. I have the experience. I’ve tried everything without success. This is because of the current political situation, nothing else,” he said.


Bedugul Botanical Gardens Closes Again
Officials Put the Cost of Damage by Flooding and Landslides at Bali’s Bedugul Botanical Garden at Rp. 2 Billion

The torrential rains that affected much of Bali on Friday night, February 10, 2017, have caused the popular tourist destination of the Bedugul Botanical Gardens to once again close its gates while officials once again try to clear away mud and damage for the second time since mid-December.

Beritabali.com quotes the manager of the Bedugul Botanical Garden, I Made Patru, who confirmed this is the second time the Garden have had to close following flooding and mudslides that occurred on December 22, 2016.

Workers at the Gardens hope to re-open for visitors in the coming few days once the latest deposit of mud and stones can be removed from the roadways.

He hoped this could be achieved by Sunday, February 12, 2017.

No injuries were reported resulting from the latest mudslide, but officials put the cost of damage at around Rp. 2 billion.

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Floods and Sludge Close Bedugul Gardens


Hostility Towards Hostels in Ubud, Bali
Gianyar Bali Tourism Official Promises Crack Down on Hostels in Ubud Blamed with Stealing Market of Traditional Homestay Operators

The Gianyar Regency Tourism Service is warning that plans are being made to move against hostels operating in Ubud that are threatening the very existence of locally owned homestays.

The chairman of the Ubud Homestay Association (UHSA), I.B. Wiryawan, said on Monday, January 30, 2017, that the homestays were a mainstay of the Ubud tourism industry. Already suffering from the appearance of budget hotels in Ubud, homestay owners are confronting a new challenge via a price war instigated by hostels.

Wiryawan said that the concept of hostels is not contemplated in the current laws covering tourism accommodation.

As reported by Bali Post, homestays offer rooms for rent with one or two beds; hostels can have as many as ten beds in a single room. Hostels sell accommodation “by the bed” for as little as Rp. 75,000 to Rp. 100,000 per bed per night. Meanwhile, homestays in Ubud sell accommodation starting from as little as Rp. 300,000 per room.

According to Wiryawan, this creates price competition that threatens the continuing operation of homestays.

Separately, the head of the Gianyar Tourism Service, A.A. Bagus Ari Brahmanta, estimates that there are 20 hostels now in operation in Ubud, promising to curb the opening of new hostels in the Regency to avoid an open price war with homestay operators.

If necessary, Brahmanta said his office would deploy local enforcement officers (Satpol PP) to make hostels become homestays with fewer beds per room.


 
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Bali Update #541
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Bali Update #540
January 15, 2007

Bali Update #539
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Bali Update #538
January 01, 2007

Bali Update #537
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Bali Update #536
December 18, 2006

Bali Update #535
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Bali Update #534
December 04, 2006

Bali Update #533
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Bali Update #532
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Bali Update #531
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Bali Update #530
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Bali Update #529
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Bali Update #528
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Bali Update #527
October 16, 2006

Bali Update #526
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Bali Update #525
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Bali Update #524
September 04, 2006

Bali Update #523
September 04, 2006

Bali Update #522
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Bali Update #521
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Bali Update #520
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Bali Update #519
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Bali Update #518
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Bali Update #517
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Bali Update #516
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Bali Update #515
July 24, 2006

Bali Update #514
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Bali Update #513
July 10, 2006

Bali Update #512
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Bali Update #511
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Bali Update #510
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Bali Update #509
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Bali Update #508
June 05, 2006

Bali Update #507
May 29, 2006

Bali Update #506
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Bali Update #505
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Bali Update #504
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Bali Update #503
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Bali Update #502
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Bali Update #501
April 17, 2006
 

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