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Bali News by Bali Update
BALI UPDATE #682 - 05 October 2009

Asia is a Bargain
Malaysia, Thailand and Bali Seen as 'Best Value' in U.K. Survey of Winter Holiday Destinations for 2009-2010.

A recent report in the Telegraph out of the United Kingdom says that Thailand, Bali and Malaysia ranked highest as "best value" destinations for Winter holidays, offering "significantly better" value than the traditional U.K. Winter getaway of the Caribbean.
Based on a survey of holiday destinations conducted by the U.K. Postal Service, the Holiday Costs Barometers indexed the price of nine "essential" holiday purchases ranging from cup of coffee, suncream, a postcard and stamp, and a three-course evening meal.
The cost of the nine items in Thailand totaled £38.13 (US$60.80); in Penang, Malaysia £ 50.25 (US$80.13) and in Bali just £46.89 (US$74.77). Nearby Australia proved to be considerably more expensive at £104.95 (US$167.35).
Sarah Munro, Head of travel at the U.K. Post Office said: "When it comes to both cost and value for money, Thailand, Bali and Malaysia are the top three hotspots this winter. Not only are they the cheapest in our survey of living costs but great deals on package holidays are on offer, too."
Destinations, such as Bali, which are generally priced in U.S. dollars also benefited from a strong U.K. Poung against the dollar. In the past six months, sterling gained 21% against the dollar.
To read the entire article: [Far East Provides Best Value for Winter Sun]


Making the Balinese at Home on their Own Island
Students from Bali International School Join Habitat for Humanity in Creating Homes for Needy Balinese.

One of the aims of the Global Citizenship Program at Bali International School is to challenge students to participate in new activities that bring benefit to both the general community and provide a personally broadening experience to the students themselves. The BIS Habitat Project is a glowing example of these principles at work.
Members of the Bali International School Habitat Group recently completed a house building project in northwest Bali. The group, formed in 2009, has as its ongoing mission the aim of supporting Habitat for Humanity goals of providing quality, affordable housing to low-income families. To this end, the group raised nearly Rp. 10 million (US$1,000) by holding raffles, evening gathering, donations, and cookie and doughnut sales.
With funds raised, 11 students, grades 11 and 12, joined two of their teachers in a hands-on home-building project. Joining Habitat for Humanity Indonesia and with support the Bali-based charity Dinari, the group undertook two projects in the village of Melaya, located between Negara and Gilimanuk in west Bali.
Kawangi Forsyth, Natasha Berting, Kelly Bencheghib, Josh Collins, Eugene Bioleau and Darwin Smith joined efforts to work on the home of I Komang Dendra, a village blacksmith, and his wife Ni Made Rini, a farmer. The couple, who share their home with a large group of children and grandchildren, joined the construction effort to replace their crumbling wooded structure with a brick house. Three month's work have resulted in the construction of foundations and structural pillars. An additional four months will see the home completed and the Balinese family moved into their new house.
Also in the same village, the project has help a local laborer, I Komang Sidiya Yasa, and his family add a septic system to their small house built with the help of Habitat for Humanity.
Shiori Harada, Nakita Haritos, Alizee Barth, Pico Muenzesheimer, Cosmo Cochrane, Nyima Casellini, and Tamara Czaban packed brick, cut rebar, bent constructed supports, mixed concrete and dug earth creating a 1.7 meter deep hole for a concrete septic system.
The BIS Habitat team is interested in building more homes for Balinese residents and is seeking contributions from the community to achieve that goal.


Bali Hotels Asked to Begin Desalinating Seawater
Governor Pastika Says Large Bali Hotels Must Desalinate Seawater to Preserve Diminishing Ground Water Supplies.

Bali's Governor, Made Mangku Pastika, is calling on Bali hotels to begin converting salt water into fresh water as a means of alleviating the growing water crisis on the island.
As reported by beritabali.com, the governor said Bali must exploit new technologies as hotels need to begin desalinating water in order to avoid further depletion of precious ground water reserves. Pastika cautioned that ground water stocks are needed to preserve Bali's delicate eco-system.
Pastika said: "The proof is that other countries can do it. We must slowly have large seaside hotels (in Bali) allocate funds to convert sea water to fresh water."
As a means to discourage the rampant use of ground water reserves, the government of Bali recently increased dramatically the tax charged to residences and businesses sinking their own water wells.
Certain areas of Bali, such as Kuta and Sanur, are showing alarming levels of sea water intrusion into ground water supplies due to the over-exploitation of fresh water wells.
Related Articles
[Bali's Diminishing Water Supply]
[Tourism as Villain in Bali's Environmental Degradation]
[Bali's Coming Clean Water Crisis]


Security Lacking at Many Bali Tourist Class Hotels
44 'Melati Class Hotels' Fail to Obtain Safety and Security Certification.

Beritabali.com reports that 44 "Melati" or "tourist class" recently failed to earn security and safety certificates issued by the government of Bali. The certificates are issued after visits and review by a team of officials from various departments of the island's government.
From a total of 60 Melati Class hotels examined, only 16 hotels earned certification. Moreover, from the 16 hotels none qualified for the highest "gold" level of certification, while 2 earned "silver" certificates and the remaining 14 "bronze."
According to the Chief of Tours for Denpasar, Putu Budiasa, the main cause for the failure among the 44 hotels who failed to earn certification was a non-professional "family style" management and minimum levels of security personnel and equipment in place at the subject hotels.
Budiasa told the press that 179 Melati class hotels have been reviewed, of which 91 have earned certification.
Budiasa said that those Melati class hotels failing to meet safety and security standards will be given training and education to allow them to eventually embrace and meet established standards.
The review and certification of safety and security at Melati Class hotels took place during the months of August and September 2009 and involved a combined team from the Denpasar police headquarters, community action agencies, disaster relief specialists, health officials, tourism officials and representatives from the Indonesian Hotel and Restaurant Association (PHRI).


Arrest Made in Murder of Japanese Tourist
West Java Man Arrested in Malang in Connection with Death of 33-Year-Old Japanese Woman in Kuta.

After a massive nationwide manhunt lasting one week, Bali police have arrested a man suspected of murdering a 33-year-old Japanese female Rika Sano.
Sano's decomposing and battered remains were found on Monday, September 28, 2009, in an empty field on Jalan Mertanadi in Kuta, near the Oleh Oleh Kampoeng Bali store.
The man arrested for the murder, identified by police as David Goltar Wicaksono, was apprehended at a hideaway in Malang, East Java. Police traced the crime to the 26-year-old man, a native of Bandung, West Java, via a MP4 player found at the same location of the dead woman's body. Authorities say the electronic device was owned by the accused and purportedly dropped in a struggle with the Japanese woman. With the help of the cyber-crime unit a picture of the man was found that matched descriptions provided by witnesses of a man with whom Sano left her Kuta hotel.
The information initially led police to a local boarding house in the Pemogan sub-district of Denpasar where the landlord confirmed that Wicaksono had not been seen for several days. Similar efforts to trace the man to his place of employment, a cigarette distributor in Denpasar, were unsuccessful. Based on leads received at his place of residence and employment, police eventually located the man in Malang.
Wicaksono has been flown back to Bali under police escort.
The Crime
The ill-fated Rika Sano was reported missing by her traveling companion, Mayumi Someya, on Friday, September 25, 2009. Sano's body was discovered in tall grass at the vacant lot in Kuta three days later with indications that she had been brutalized and raped prior to her death.
Sano was last seen on the Friday, leaving her hotel with a man, now believed to be Wicaksono, who told hotel staff that he was a plain-clothes officer assigned to the Bali Police.


ASITA Bali Unduly Pessimistic on Arrivals for 2009
Bali Tour Operators Association Expresses Doubts on Arrival Targets Despite Positive Tourism Numbers.

The Bali Chapter of the Indonesian Association of Travel Agents (ASITA) has expressed it doubts that the targeted 1.8 million foreign visitors to Bali will be achieve in the current year, citing the global financial crisis and the series of natural disasters plaguing the Asia-Pacific as major impediments.
The Chairman of Bali's ASITA Chapter, Al Purwa, told beritabali.com that the recent killing of Malaysian terrorist Noordin M. Top will have little positive impact on Bali tourism. He said that many tourists still fear a visit to Bali, given the island's continuing status as a prime target for terrorist acts.
Explained Purwa: "The impact (of his shooting) will not be very significant because Noordin should have been shot five years ago, allowing him the time to train others. What's more, Bali remains a main (terrorism) target."
The ASITA Chairman predicts that tourism totals to Bali will return to normal in the first quarter or 2010. He also said that data from his organization showed Bali hotels averaging occupancies of 60% during what is now entering a "low" season for the island.
In contrast to ASITA's dour predictions and based on tourism arrivals through the end of July, balidiscovery.com recently extrapolated that total foreign arrivals to Bali might exceed 2.2 million for the year 2010. Through the end of July 2009, Bali foreign tourist arrivals had already hit 1.242 million, an increase of 11.5% over the first seven months of 2007. In order to Purwa's negative prediction of less than 1.8 million visitors for 2009 to occur, arrivals to Bali would have to plummet by a very significant degree and begin averaging around 111,000 visitors each month through the end of the year; a drop of 54% in arrivals for the remaining 5 months of 2009.
Related Article
[Bali to Exceed 2 Million Foreign Visitors in 2009?]


Rare Turtles Get a Second Chance on Life on a Bali Beach
Bali Hai Cruises and Local Conservation Groups Release a Thousand Turtles on a Western Shore in Bali.

Bali Hai Cruises in cooperation with Kurmah Asih's Turtle Adoption and Conservation Program recently released more than 1,000 turtle hatchlings on Pranjak Beach in west Bali.
Turtle eggs collected by fishermen from beaches where they would not have survived left unattended were brought to Kurmah Asih's turtle hatchery where the fishermen were rewarded for their efforts. At the hatchery careful care of the incubating turtles and neo-natal care for the hatchlings is provided by a group of workers and scientists.
Funded by Bali Hai Cruises, the operators of a number of popular day-cruise products, and from contributions from guests - the money is used to pay fishermen who gather the eggs and provide salaries for workers at the turtle hatchery. All data concerning collections, hatchings and re-release into the oceans is carefully recorded for analysis by Conservation International.
Once the baby turtles are released back into the sea, they face a challenging journey of 20 years before they return to the shore to lay their first batch of eggs.
Encouraging signs have been found in the form of modest increases in the number of turtles returning to shore to lay their eggs. This is especially heartening given the threats of fishing nets, climate change and the pollution of our oceans with which the turtles must contend.
If you would like to learn more about the turtle release program or participate in a "turtle release cruise" contact Bali Hai Cruises at telephone +62-(0)361-720 331.
Book a [Bali Hai Lembongan Island Beach Club Cruise]


Rich Musical Echoes of the Past
Reconstructed From Early Recordings, Rare Gamelan Performance Slated for Denpasar on Thursday, October 8, 2009.

As part of the 3-day Maha Bandana commemoration of mass ritual suicide (Puputan) before Dutch troops that took place in downtown Denpasar in 1906, the Mekar Bhuana gamelan orchestra has been asked to present a public concert at Puputan Square on Thursday, October 8, 2009 at 5:00 p.m..
The gamelan performance will precede a late afternoon parade marking the sacred Puputan and will showcase two different original styles from Denpasar: Banjar Pagan Kelod and Banjar Titih.
Seldom heard and almost extinct from Bali's cultural memory, the performance has been lovingly reconstructed based upon oldest known recordings of semar pegulingan.
Between Deng, Dung and Dang
Chosen for re-performance is the Tabuh Ginanti first performed by the group from Banjar Titih, a banjar located on Jalan Sumatra in Denpasar. The explosion of the kebyar style from Bali's north, saw the gamelan set used in the 1928 recording melted down in 1952. The vintage recording that inspires the coming performance is taken from is the compilation of Balinese music that originally inspired Colin McPhee to travel to Bali in the 1930s to study Balinese gamelan. The brilliant musician and musicologist was seduced by the scale of the semar pegulingan from Titih, causing McPhee to comment: "It is a scale of indescribably tonal beauty, remarkable for the unusual minor third occurring between deng and dung and the resulting near major second found between dung and dang."
Painstakingly notated from the crackling old recording, the musicians of Mekar Bhuana have worked diligently to present a faithful presentation of a musical form little hear in Bali for nearly 60 years.
The special performance by Mekar Bhuana will be followed by a several dance performances.
Rare Performance of the Tabuh Gianti – a Gamelan Composition in the Banjur Titih Tradition
Performed by the Mekar Bhuana Gamelan Orchestra
Thursday, October 8, 2009 at 5:00 p.m.
Puputan Square, Renon, Denpasar, Bali.


I Got the Horse Right Here, His Name is Paul Revere
Silly Hat Time is Here! Melbourne Cup Race Coverage at the Sanur Paradise Plaza Hotel on November 3, 2009.

A virtual national holiday each year in Australia, The Melbourne Cup watches that entire nation come to a standstill for the historic horse race held at Flemington Racecourse.
Run over a course of 3,200 meters for three-year-olds the annual event ranks as the most popular event in an already "sports mad" country with prize money qualify the run as one of the richest turf races in the world.
The race starts at 3 p.m. Melbourne time on the first Tuesday in November, with pre-race coverage focusing on the outlandish headgear worn to the race by its female race enthusiasts.
This Australian tradition held since 1861 will be broadcast live to the Denpasar Room of the Sanur Paradise Plaza Hotel in Bali. Gates open locally in Bali at 10:00 a.m. local time to facilitate the numerous sweeps, lucky door prizes, silent auctions and door prizes leading up to the actual race.
Admission to the event coats Rp. 450,000 (US$45) which covers the race, door prizes, a lavish buffet lunch, bubbles and/or beer on arrival. Discounts are available to those booking a table of ten.
Funds raised from the event will be given to support worthy local charitable causes.
For more information or to make an essential booking telephone ++62-(0)85935212880, ++62-(0)8123874136 or the Hotel at ++62-(0)361-281781.


Staying for Shorter Periods and Spending Less in Bali
Bank Indonesia Reports Explains Why, Despite Surging Arrivals, Tourism Income for Bali May be Lagging.

Despite growing tourist arrivals to Bali, recent information released by Bank Indonesia show that the amount being spent by tourist visitors to Bali is on the decline.
Ida Bagus Viraguna Bagoes Oka who heads the Bali branch of Bank Indonesia, pointed to the changing composition of Bali visitors now dominated by Asians who stay for shorter periods and spend less on a per diem basis while holidaying in Bali.
Preliminary foreign arrival totals to Bali for August 2009 show 222,384 visitors, an increase of 18.53% over the same month in 2008 (187,584). However, more than 70% of all Bali arrivals now hail from the Asia-Pacific region that, according to Bank Indonesia, "take shorter holidays, spend less and stay in cheaper hotels."
Oka predicts that Bali's economic growth for Q3 2009 would slow to 5.6%, a decline of 0.3% from Q3 2008.
Shorter stays by oftentimes less-culturally inclined Asian visitors also results in reduced visits to the culturally-rich but more remote areas of Bali outside the island's busy south.


KLM to Resume Flights to Bali
Thrice Weekly Service to Commence on December 6, 2009.

KLM Royal Dutch Airlines will recommence service between Amsterdam's Schiphol Airport and Bali's Ngurah Rai Airport, effective December 6, 2009.
KLM ceased flying to Bali on October 15, 1997, representing a service gap of more than 11 years to the popular holiday island.
The new KLM service connecting Amsterdam and Denpasar will fly three times each week. Flight KL835 will depart Amsterdam at 21:00 on Sunday arriving in Bali the following day at 20:10. The return flight, KL836, will depart from Denpasar at 21:30 on Mondays, Wednesdays and Saturdays, arriving at Amsterdam Airport Schiphol at 08:00.
Flights in both direction will have an intermediate stop in Singapore and be operated with Boeing 777-300aircraft configured to carry 390 Economy and 35 Business Class passengers.


Less We Forget
Ceremony Held at Australian Consulate to Remember Those Who Died in 2005 Bali Bombing.

A small, dignified ceremony was held at the Australian Consulate in Denpasar on October 1 2009, to commemorate those who perished in terrorists attacks on that date at several locations in Bali in 2005.
Officiating was the Australian Consul-General in Bali, Lex Bartlem, with attendees including victim's families, the Regent of Badung Anak Agung Gde Agung, Bali's Governor Made Mangku Pastika and the Deputy Chief of Police for Bali Brig. General Ketut Adria.
20 people died and scores were seriously injured in the 2005 bombings at restaurants Jimbaran Beach and Kuta.
Quoted in the Jakarta Post, Bali's Governor said: "We are often reminded about the victims of the Bali bombings. I believe their spirits are still among us." Adding: "We should support every effort to fight terrorism. Any act of terrorism should be fought by people around the globe."
Governor Pastika also told those in attendance of the recent establishment of a Bali Crisis Center to confront any incidents in the future, including natural disaster.
The Center, together with an entire range of other steps put in place, have created a security situation in Bali determined to prevent or limit any future terrorists attacks and ensure the safety of island visitors.


Give Peace a Park
Australians and Indonesians Join Forces to Buy Former Sari Club to Create a Peace Park to Honor Victims of 2002 Bali Bombing.

A group of concerned Australians continue efforts to convert the location of the former Sari Club, destroyed by a terrorist attack on October 12, 2002, into a memorial Peace Park.
The Bali Peace Park Association was formed on September 2, 2008, with a announced goals of creating a park for spiritual reflection that will contribute to tolerance, understanding and freedom among future generation without reference to race, religion, culture or nationality.
Nick Way, one of the founders of The Bali Peace Park Association, told Beritabali.com that his group is raising funds from Australian diplomats, Australians citizens around the world and international companies in order to purchase the land and construct the proposed park.
Efforts to create the park have earned widespread support among groups in Bali, including Bali's Governor Made Mangku Pastika and one of the "local heroes" of the Bali Bombing, Haji Bambang Priyanto. Priyanto won numerous awards for organizing humantarian assistance to the dead and injured in the wake of the 2002 attack.
Priyanto told beritabali.com that the park would be a fitting tribute to the 202 who died in the terrorist attack and, over time, would become an important tourist destination within the island.
Price of Land
In a separate report carried in NusaBali, Nick Way complained that the asking price form the land present owner of Rp. 24 billion (US$240,000) for a plot of land measuring only 800 square meters was proving a significant obstacle to fund-raisers. Independent property valuation surveys conducted on the lot in 2005 suggested a price of around Rp. 8 billion (US$800,000) was more appropriate to the lot's commercial value.


Crackdown on Illegal Bali Hotels and Clubs Begins
Badung Officials Start Closing and Sealing of Illegal Hotels and Nightspots in Kuta and Legian Area of Bali.

Community enforcement officers have finally begun to take decisive action against Badung regency accommodation and night entertainment venues who have failed to secure required licenses and permits in support of their operations.
On Monday, September 29, 2009, authorities formally sealed and closed the 11 unit Sari Residence on Jalan Nakula in Legian, refusing to accept the owner's excuse that the property was operating for almost an entire year on a training basis pending issuance of the needed operating licenses.
The closure of the hotel, the first in a series of a number of similar shutdowns to come, was ordered by Badung's Regent A.A. Gde Agung who had reportedly wearied of numerous news reports depicting his administration as incapable of administering local zoning laws.
According to NusaBali, a number of local businesses were summoned to meetings with Badung officials and reminded that leniency was at an end and businesses without permits would be closed. The Head of the enforcement division (Satpol PP Badung), Adi Arnawa, told the press: "Not only the Sara Residence, but we have also called on the VI Ai Pi, Lanai Restaurant, Best Western Sapta Petala Hotel and Dee Jay Café."
Arnawa explained further: "The government is often forced into a corner. When, in fact, the business owners build first, operate and only then begin to organize permits. The result is that many buildings do not conform to the principle permits. This is a situation which must be addressed."
True to Their Words
A follow up report in Radar Bali confirmed that the crackdown is continuing, following the closure of the Sara Residence, the Vi Ai Pi Bar in Legian closed it doors "for maintenance" on Friday, October 2nd just hours before enforcement officers were due to close and seal the premises. Badung enforcement official Arnawa depicted the self-closure in the following terms: "They (Vi Ai Pi) already have many customers, so they decided to protect their image by closing of their own accord before they were forced to close by officials."
Radar Bali reports that the Vi Ai Pi Bar located near ground zero had posted a "Temporarily Closed for Maintenance on its entry door.
Similarly, the Lanai Restaurant, which has also been cited for not having the required licenses, voluntarily closed its doors on Saturday, October 3, 2009. Arnawa also said another bar in Legian, whose name he had forgotten, but was close to the Vi Ai Pi, had also closed.
Separate reports in NusaBali confirm the unnamed bar as Crusoes.
Related Articles
[ Sara Residence in Bali - Where Rules Don't Apply]
[ Making Up the Rules as They Go Along]
[Best Western Opens in a No Hotel Zone]
[ Does the Sheriff Always Win at the Best Westerns?]


The Bali-Hawaii Connection
Hawaiian Fans of U.S. President Barack Obama Hold a Luau on Sanur Beach in Bali.

Trivia Question: Where was the very first inaugural ball for U.S. President Barack Obama held?
Answer: In Jakarta Indonesia on the evening of January 20, 2009, a full 12 hours before the "other" ball held in Washington, D.C..
Because of the special attachment felt for the then newly elected Preident who lived for five years as a young boy in Jakarta, the Jakarta Inaugural Ball was a gala affair of fine food and drink, music and fund raising for local charitable causes. Instrumental in organizing the Jakarta event were expatriates hailing from the State of Hawaii, the new President's state of birth.
As a continuance of that celebration, members of the Hawaiian community abroad in Indonesia and others gathered again on Saturday, October 3, 2009, at the Bali Hyatt Resort in Sanur, Bali for an authentic Luau. Under the careful tutelage of a group of "Hawaiians" including Metro TV Anchor Dalton Tanonaka, Jakarta restaurateur Ron Mueller and Hyatt Hotelier Ron Nomura - a large sucking pig and several turkeys were cooked in a hot stone pit and later served with Taro and a number of other Hawaiian island culinary specialties.
Highlights of the Bali Luau, in addition to the food, were a Rp. 10 million (US$1,000) donation given by the group to the Semara Putra Orphanage in Semarapura, East Bali and special delivery letter sent to the group from 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue in Washington, D.C..
That letter, sent by Maya Soetoro-Ng, the Indonesian-born half-sister of President Obama, said the Bali event affirmed the existence of benevolent people who "can and will help to make Indonesia and the world stronger." Sdding, "I am very proud to have my family's name attached to the impressive generosity of all in attendance."
Extending a warm "Aloha" to those gathered on a Bali beach, Maya Soetoro-Ng closed her letter by saying: "I think that we are collectively ushering in a new era of greater giving and service that is wonderful, I send fond regards from the entire family in D.C.."


Far Away But in Our Prayers
September 30, 2009 Earthquake in West Sumatra Takes Massive Toll on Life and Property. Bali Far Removed from Epicenter and Destruction.

A 7.6 magnitude earthquake struck just 60 kilometers off the coast of the West Sumatran capital of Padang late on the afternoon of Wednesday, September 30, 2009. The quake's close proximity to Padang, a port city of 900,000 people, caused massive physical destruction and loss of life.
The death toll has now officially passed the 1,000 mark with as many as 3,000 people and, in some cases, entire isolated villages, remaining unaccounted for. One area, only a short distance from Padang, saw an entire hillside collapse, creating a bulldozed construction-site landscape where once was a green jungle-side community. Hospitals, offices, schools and homes were severely damaged with one estimate saying 70% of hotel rooms in Padang have been destroyed. At least one major hjotel ciollapse trapping and killing many guests and workers inside the building.
Indonesia's and the world's response to the disaster was immediate. International rescue teams flew into the affect areas with relief supplies, rescue teams and badly needed rescue dogs.
The National Disaster Management Agency estimates 83,712 homes, 200 public buildings and 285 schools have been destroyed. Over 100,000 more building suffered significant damage, at least five bridges have collapsed and many miles of local roads are destroyed.
Assisting with relief efforts has been the very open and accepting attitude of local and national officials to both domestic and international groups offering assistance.
Bali Physically Unaffected
Indonesia is a nation of tremendous breadth. The time to fly from one end of the country to the other is more than the time required to fly from Los Angeles to New York City. While the considerable size of the archipelago is lost on many people unfamiliar with Indonesia, a massive disaster in any corner of the Country leaves most areas of a nation comprised of more than 17,600 islands unscathed. People in Bali, like most parts of Indonesia, did not feel the Sumatran quake, but were no less shaken by the tragic developments unfolding on the national and international news media. And, like their fellow Indonesians, the people of Bali responded to relief appeals organized by the government, places of worship, the media, non-governmental agencies and banks providing an instant transfer facility for anyone using an ATM.
Balidiscovery.com joins the island of Bali in extending its condolences, prayer and materials support to the people of West Sumatra.
Those wishing to help alleviate the suffering of the people of West Sumatra can send donations to:
Palang Merah Indonesia – The Indonesian Red Cross
BCA KCU Thamrin
Account Number: 206.300668.8,
Account Name: Kantor Pusat PMI.
OR
Bank Mandiri KCU Jakarta Krakatau Steel
Account Number 070-00-0011601-7,
Account Name: Palang Merah Indonesia.


 
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Bali Update #631
October 13, 2008

Bali Update #630
October 06, 2008

Bali Update #629
September 29, 2008

Bali Update #628
September 22, 2008

Bali Update #627
September 15, 2008

Bali Update #626
September 08, 2008

Bali Update #625
September 01, 2008

Bali Update #624
August 25, 2008

Bali Update #623
August 18, 2008

Bali Update #622
August 11, 2008

Bali Update #621
August 04, 2008

Bali Update #620
July 28, 2008

Bali Update #619
July 21, 2008

Bali Update #618
July 14, 2008

Bali Update #617
July 07, 2008

Bali Update #616
June 30, 2008

Bali Update #615
June 23, 2008

Bali Update #614
June 16, 2008

Bali Update #613
June 09, 2008

Bali Update #612
June 02, 2008

Bali Update #611
May 26, 2008

Bali Update #610
May 19, 2008

Bali Update #609
May 12, 2008

Bali Update #608
May 05, 2008

Bali Update #607
April 28, 2008

Bali Update #606
April 21, 2008

Bali Update #605
April 14, 2008

Bali Update #604
April 07, 2008

Bali Update #603
March 31, 2008

Bali Update #602
March 10, 2008

Bali Update #599
March 03, 2008

Bali Update #598
February 25, 2008

Bali Update #597
February 18, 2008

Bali Update #596
February 11, 2008

Bali Update #595
February 04, 2008

Bali Update #594
January 28, 2008

Bali Update #593
January 21, 2008

Bali Update #592
January 14, 2008

Bali Update #591
January 07, 2008

Bali Update #590
December 31, 2007

Bali Update #589
December 24, 2007

Bali Update #588
December 17, 2007

Bali Update #587
December 10, 2007

Bali Update #586
December 03, 2007

Bali Update #585
November 26, 2007

Bali Update #584
November 19, 2007

Bali Update #583
November 12, 2007

Bali Update #582
November 05, 2007

Bali Update #581
October 29, 2007

Bali Update #580
October 22, 2007

Bali Update #579
October 15, 2007

Bali Update #578
October 08, 2007

Bali Update #577
October 01, 2007

Bali Update #576
September 24, 2007

Bali Update #575
September 17, 2007

Bali Update #574
September 10, 2007

Bali Update #573
September 03, 2007

Bali Update #572
August 27, 2007

Bali Update #571
August 20, 2007

Bali Update #570
August 13, 2007

Bali Update #569
August 06, 2007

Bali Update #568
July 30, 2007

Bali Update #567
July 23, 2007

Bali Update #566
July 16, 2007

Bali Update #565
July 09, 2007

Bali Update #564
July 02, 2007

Bali Update #563
June 25, 2007

Bali Update #562
June 18, 2007

Bali Update #561
June 11, 2007

Bali Update #560
June 04, 2007

Bali Update #559
May 28, 2007

Bali Update #558
May 21, 2007

Bali Update #557
May 14, 2007

Bali Update #556
May 07, 2007

Bali Update #555
April 30, 2007

Bali Update #554
April 23, 2007

Bali Update #553
April 16, 2007

Bali Update #552
April 09, 2007

Bali Update #551
April 02, 2007

Bali Update #550
March 26, 2007

Bali Update #549
March 19, 2007

Bali Update #548
March 12, 2007

Bali Update #547
March 05, 2007

Bali Update #546
February 26, 2007

Bali Update #545
February 19, 2007

Bali Update #544
February 12, 2007

Bali Update #543
February 05, 2007

Bali Update #542
January 29, 2007

Bali Update #541
January 22, 2007

Bali Update #540
January 15, 2007

Bali Update #539
January 08, 2007

Bali Update #538
January 01, 2007

Bali Update #537
December 25, 2006

Bali Update #536
December 18, 2006

Bali Update #535
December 11, 2006

Bali Update #534
December 04, 2006

Bali Update #533
November 27, 2006

Bali Update #532
November 20, 2006

Bali Update #531
November 13, 2006

Bali Update #530
November 06, 2006

Bali Update #529
October 30, 2006

Bali Update #528
October 23, 2006

Bali Update #527
October 16, 2006

Bali Update #526
October 9, 2006

Bali Update #525
October 2, 2006

Bali Update #524
September 04, 2006

Bali Update #523
September 04, 2006

Bali Update #522
September 04, 2006

Bali Update #521
September 04, 2006

Bali Update #520
August 28, 2006

Bali Update #519
August 21, 2006

Bali Update #518
August 14, 2006

Bali Update #517
August 07, 2006

Bali Update #516
July 31, 2006

Bali Update #515
July 24, 2006

Bali Update #514
July 17, 2006

Bali Update #513
July 10, 2006

Bali Update #512
July 03, 2006

Bali Update #511
June 26, 2006

Bali Update #510
June 19, 2006

Bali Update #509
June 12, 2006

Bali Update #508
June 05, 2006

Bali Update #507
May 29, 2006

Bali Update #506
May 22, 2006

Bali Update #505
May 15, 2006

Bali Update #504
May 08, 2006

Bali Update #503
May 01, 2006

Bali Update #502
April 24, 2006

Bali Update #501
April 17, 2006

Bali Update #500
April 10, 2006

Bali Update #499
April 03, 2006

Bali Update #498
March 27, 2006

Bali Update #497
March 20, 2006

Bali Update #496
March 13, 2006

Bali Update #495
March 06, 2006

Bali Update #494
February 27, 2006

Bali Update #493
February 20, 2006

Bali Update #492
February 13, 2006

Bali Update #491
February 06, 2006

Bali Update #490
January 30, 2006

Bali Update #489
January 23, 2006

Bali Update #488
January 16, 2006

Bali Update #487
January 09, 2006

Bali Update #486
January 02, 2006

Bali Update #485
December 26, 2005

Bali Update #484
December 19, 2005

Bali Update #482
December 12, 2005

Bali Update #481
December 05, 2005

Bali Update #481
November 28, 2005

Bali Update #480
November 21, 2005

Bali Update #479
November 14, 2005

Bali Update #478
November 07, 2005

Bali Update #477
October 31, 2005

Bali Update #476
October 24, 2005

Bali Update #475
October 17, 2005

Bali Update #474
October 10, 2005

Bali Update #473
October 03, 2005

Bali Update #472
September 26, 2005

Bali Update #471
September 19, 2005

Bali Update #470
September 12, 2005

Bali Update #469
September 05, 2005

Bali Update #468
August 29, 2005

Bali Update #467
August 22, 2005

Bali Update #466
August 15, 2005

Bali Update #465
August 08, 2005

Bali Update #464
August 01, 2005

Bali Update #463
July 25, 2005

Bali Update #462
July 18, 2005

Bali Update #461
July 11, 2005

Bali Update #460
July 04, 2005

Bali Update #459
June 27, 2005

Bali Update #458
June 20, 2005

Bali Update #457
June 13, 2005

Bali Update #456
June 06, 2005

Bali Update #455
May 30, 2005

Bali Update #454
May 23, 2005

Bali Update #453
May 16, 2005

Bali Update #452
May 09, 2005

Bali Update #451
May 02, 2005

Bali Update #450
April 25, 2005

Bali Update #449
April 18, 2005

Bali Update #448
April 11, 2005

Bali Update #447
April 04, 2005

Bali Update #446
March 28, 2005

Bali Update #445
March 21, 2005

Bali Update #444
March 14, 2005

Bali Update #443
March 07, 2005

Bali Update #442
February 28, 2005

Bali Update #441
February 21, 2005

Bali Update #440
February 14, 2005

Bali Update #439
February 07, 2005

Bali Update #438
January 31, 2005

Bali Update #437
January 24, 2005

Bali Update #436
January 17, 2005

Bali Update #435
January 10, 2005

Bali Update #434
January 03, 2005

Bali Update #433
December 27, 2004

Bali Update #432
December 20, 2004

Bali Update #431
December 13, 2004

Bali Update #430
December 06, 2004

Bali Update #429
November 29, 2004

Bali Update #428
November 22, 2004

Bali Update #427
November 15, 2004

Bali Update #426
November 08, 2004

Bali Update #425
November 01, 2004

Bali Update #424
October 25, 2004

Bali Update #423
October 18, 2004

Bali Update #422
October 11, 2004

Bali Update #421
October 04, 2004

Bali Update #420
September 27, 2004

Bali Update #419
September 20, 2004

Bali Update #418
September 13, 2004

Bali Update #417
September 06, 2004

Bali Update #416
August 30, 2004

Bali Update #415
August 23, 2004

Bali Update #414
August 16, 2004

Bali Update #413
August 09, 2004

Bali Update #412
August 02, 2004

Bali Update #411
July 26, 2004

Bali Update #410
July 19, 2004

Bali Update #409
July 12, 2004

Bali Update #408
July 05, 2004

Bali Update #407
June 28, 2004

Bali Update #406
June 21, 2004

Bali Update #405
June 14, 2004

Bali Update #404
June 07, 2004

Bali Update #403
May 31, 2004

Bali Update #402
May 24, 2004

Bali Update #401
May 17, 2004

Bali Update #400
May 10, 2004

Bali Update #399
May 03, 2004

Bali Update #398
April 26, 2004

Bali Update #397
April 19, 2004

Bali Update #396
April 12, 2004

Bali Update #395
April 05, 2004

Bali Update #394
March 29, 2004

Bali Update #393
March 22, 2004

Bali Update #392
March 15, 2004

Bali Update #391
March 08, 2004

Bali Update #390
March 01, 2004

Bali Update #389
February 23, 2004

Bali Update #388
February 16, 2004

Bali Update #387
February 09, 2004

Bali Update #386
February 02, 2004

Bali Update #385
January 26, 2004

Bali Update #384
January 19, 2004

Bali Update #383
January 12, 2004

Bali Update #382
January 05, 2004

Bali Update #381
December 29, 2003

Bali Update #380
December 22, 2003

Bali Update #379
December 15, 2003

Bali Update #378
December 08, 2003

Bali Update #377
December 01, 2003

Bali Update #376
November 24, 2003

Bali Update #375
November 17, 2003

Bali Update #374
November 10, 2003

Bali Update #373
November 03, 2003

Bali Update #372
October 27, 2003

Bali Update #371
October 20, 2003

Bali Update #370
October 13, 2003

Bali Update #369
October 06, 2003

Bali Update #368
September 29, 2003

Bali Update #367
September 22, 2003

Bali Update #366
September 15, 2003

Bali Update #365
September 08, 2003

Bali Update #364
September 01, 2003

Bali Update #363
August 25, 2003

Bali Update #362
August 18, 2003

Bali Update #361
August 11, 2003

Bali Update #360
August 04, 2003

Bali Update #359
July 28, 2003

Bali Update #358
July 21, 2003

Bali Update #357
July 14, 2003

Bali Update #356
July 07, 2003

Bali Update #355
June 30, 2003

Bali Update #354
June 23, 2003

Bali Update #353
June 16, 2003

Bali Update #352
June 09, 2003

Bali Update #351
June 02, 2003

Bali Update #350
May 26, 2003

Bali Update #349
May 19, 2003

Bali Update #348
May 12, 2003

Bali Update #347
May 05, 2003

Bali Update #346
April 28, 2003

Bali Update #345
April 21, 2003

Bali Update #344
April 14, 2003

Bali Update #343
April 08, 2003

Bali Update #342
April 07, 2003

Bali Update #341
March 31, 2003

Bali Update #340
March 24, 2003

Bali Update #339
March 17, 2003

Bali Update #338
March 10, 2003

Bali Update #337
March 03, 2003

Bali Update #336
February 24, 2003

Bali Update #335
February 17, 2003

Bali Update #334
February 10, 2003

Bali Update #333
February 03, 2003

Bali Update #332
January 27, 2003

Bali Update #331
January 20, 2003

Bali Update #330
January 13, 2003

Bali Update #329
January 06, 2003

Bali Update #328
December 30, 2002

Bali Update #327
December 23, 2002

Bali Update #326
December 16, 2002

Bali Update #325
December 09, 2002

Bali Update #324
December 02, 2002

Bali Update #323
November 25, 2002

Bali Update #322
November 18, 2002

Bali Update #321
November 11, 2002

Bali Update #320
November 04, 2002

Bali Update #319
October 28, 2002

Bali Update #318
October 21, 2002

Bali Update #317
October 14, 2002

Bali Update #316
October 07, 2002

Bali Update #315
September 30, 2002

Bali Update #314
September 23, 2002

Bali Update #313
September 16, 2002

Bali Update #312
September 09, 2002

Bali Update #311
September 02, 2002

Bali Update #310
August 26, 2002

Bali Update #309
August 19, 2002

Bali Update #308
August 12, 2002

Bali Update #307
August 05, 2002

Bali Update #306
July 29, 2002

Bali Update #305
July 22, 2002

Bali Update #304
July 15, 2002

Bali Update #303
July 08, 2002

Bali Update #302
July 01, 2002

Bali Update #301
June 24, 2002

Bali Update #300
June 17, 2002

Bali Update #299
June 10, 2002

Bali Update #298
June 03, 2002

Bali Update #297
May 27, 2002

Bali Update #296
May 20, 2002

Bali Update #295
May 13, 2002

Bali Update #294
May 06, 2002

Bali Update #293
April 29, 2002

Bali Update #292
April 22, 2002

Bali Update #291
April 15, 2002

Bali Update #290
April 08, 2002

Bali Update #289
April 01, 2002

Bali Update #288
March 25, 2002

Bali Update #287
March 18, 2002

Bali Update #286
March 11, 2002

Bali Update #285
March 04, 2002

Bali Update #284
February 25, 2002

Bali Update #283
February 18, 2002

Bali Update #282
February 11, 2002

Bali Update #281
February 04, 2002

Bali Update #280
January 28, 2002

Bali Update #279
January 21, 2002

Bali Update #278
January 14, 2002

Bali Update #277
January 07, 2002

Bali Update #276
December 31, 2001

Bali Update #275
December 24, 2001

Bali Update #274
December 17, 2001

Bali Update #273
December 10, 2001

Bali Update #272
December 03, 2001

Bali Update #271
November 26, 2001

Bali Update #270
November 19, 2001

Bali Update #269
November 12, 2001

Bali Update #268
November 05, 2001

Bali Update #267
October 29, 2001

Bali Update #266
October 22, 2001

Bali Update #265
October 15, 2001

Bali Update #264
October 08, 2001

Bali Update #263
October 01, 2001

Bali Update #262
September 24, 2001

Bali Update #261
September 17, 2001

Bali Update #260
September 10, 2001

Bali Update #259
September 03, 2001

Bali Update #258
August 27, 2001

Bali Update #257
August 20, 2001

Bali Update #256
August 13, 2001

Bali Update #255
August 06, 2001

Bali Update #254
July 30, 2001
 

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