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Komplek Pertokoan
Sanur Raya No. 27
Jl. By Pass Ngurah Rai,
Sanur, Bali, Indonesia

Tel:
++62 361 286 283

Fax:
++62 361 286 284

U.S.A. Fax:(toll free)
1-800-506-8633

U.K. Fax:
++44-20-7000-1235

Australian Fax:
++61-2-94750419

24h:
++62 812 3819724

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Bali News by Bali Update
BALI UPDATE #1042 - 22 August 2016

IN THIS UPDATE


Wanted by Bali Police
Police Search Underways for Thomas Schon and Sara Connor of NSW, Australia Sought in Connection with the Death of a Policeman in Kuta, Bali

Bali Police are seeking two Australians believed to have been involved in the death of an Indonesian policeman on Kuta Beach in the early hours of Wednesday, August 17, 2016.

The dead police officer, I Wayan Sudarsa, was found dead on the beach in front of the Pullman Hotel in Kuta with 39 wounds. Police believe the couple may have beaten the policeman to death.

Police are displaying posters in various locations around Bali, with surveillance underway at all air and sea ports for the two Australians identified as Thomas Schon and Sara Connor, both from New South Wales Australian.

Police are refusing to comment further on the case until they succeed in taking the two Australians into custody.

The public is reminded that withholding information regarding fugitives or harbouring individuals being sought by police is a felony in Indonesia.

Anyone having information on the two should immediately contact the nearest police post in Bali.


Pullman Art Exhibition
“Dreamworld” by Irene Hoff and Friends at Pullman Bali Nirwana Legian September 27 until December 11, 2016

“Dreamworld” – an exhibition of paintings and artistic collages by Dutch artist Irene Hoff and friends will be held at the Pullman Bali Legian September 27 until December 11, 2016.

A well-established artist, Irene Hoff is embarking on a new, more collaborative approach to her artistic creations. By blending collage style pop imagery with modern and traditional symbolism, this results in remarkable bespoke works or art.

In this exhibition, Irene Hoff is collaborating with some of the most talented artists worldwide, with a particular focus on local talent based in Bali. The collective believes that by working together, a broad group of people can be reached and stimulated to open up new ways of thinking, challenging them to step out of their ordinary lives, creating new perspectives.

During the exhibition, Pullman Bali Legian Nirwana will present combination of contemporary art, fashion, and food in keeping with it new “Artist Playground by Pullman Exhibition Concept."  A well-known fashion brand based in Bali will also be the part of the exhibition opening, representing the fashion industry to support the image and the ambiance of the artist playground.

Famous hair stylist Rob Peetom will join the team to support the opening event. The invitation-only launching event will be held on Tuesday, September 27, 2016.

For and invitation and details, Email or telephone +62-(0)811 385 0387


Running to Help Bali
Anantara Seminyak Bali Resort Sunset Run Saturday, October 29, 2016

Anatara Seminyak Bali Resort's “Sunset Run” in support of charity will be held on Saturday, October 29, 2016.

The 3-kilometre running-route along Seminyak Beach gets underway as the sun sets over Bali’s western shore that will be cooled with ocean breezes

All proceeds raised from the event will be donated to two non-profit organizations in Bali: the Suryani Institute for Mental Illness dedicated to improving the mental health system in Bali and Yayasan Senyum Bali that provides medical assistance to people with craniofacial disabilities.

Registration takes place at Anantara Seminyak Bali Resort, where the run both starts and finishes.

Lucky Draw prizes include luxury stays at Per AQUUM Maldives and Anantara Resorts in South Asia Pacific, worth more than US$ 8,000.

Charity fun run registration costs Rp. 150,000 per person and includes an exclusive t-shirt, finisher medal, mineral water and a Rp. 100,000 shopping voucher for sport apparel purchases at ‘Our Daily Dose’ stores.

Register for the “Sunset Run” in advance at the Yayasan Senyum Bali shops in Ubud, Oz Radio’s Bali office and at Anantara Seminyak.

For runners who book in advance, a special early bird discount is available up until September 30, 2016 at Rp. 125,000 per person. However, those who wish to make a donation to the non-profit organizations are more than welcome to do so.

For more information telephone + 62-(0)361-737773,

Email


Trouble on Two Wheels
Arrest Made In Brawl Involving Dutch Motorcycle Club Holidaying in Bali

A violent brawl on Monday, August 8, 2016, by members of the Dutch motorcycle Club “Satudarah” at the Pyramid Club on Jalan Dewi Sri in Kuta remains under police investigation.

As reported by DenPost, after days of intense police analysis of CCTV footage from the restaurant-bar, a man, identified only with the initial “M,” was taken into custody on Sunday, August 14, 2016. Police are now determining whether they have sufficient evidence to charge “M” with a crime in connection with a brawl that caused substantial property damage and sent several to jail.

“M” is reportedly an employee of the Pyramid Club and not a member of the Dutch Motorcycle Club. “M” was determined to have brought to a sharp weapon to the club on the night of the brawl.

Police are reported to be looking for another man with the initials “PK” who was seen on film to have stabbed a member of the Satudarah motorcycle club.

PK is a member of one of Bali’s street gangs (ormas).

Related Article

The Art of Motorcycle Brazenness


Busted in Bali
Australian-U.K. Couple Detained by Bali Police in Beach Murder of On-Duty Police Officer

The Sydney Morning Herald reports that a Byron Bay, NSW woman, Sara Connor, and her British companion, David Taylor, are now in police custody in Bali in connection with the murder of a Balinese police offer on Kuta Beach.

The two peaceably surrendered to police on Friday afternoon, August 19, 2016, in downtown Denpasar accompanied by staff from the Australian Consulate.

were handcuffed and driven to police headquarters in two separate vehicles.

Prior to the arrest, Bali police had circulated pictures of Sara Connor and Thomas Schon, both identified as Australians, in connection with the violent death of an on-duty Indonesian policeman Wayan Sudarsa on early Wednesday morning, August 17, 2016.

Schon contacted the media to underline he “has never been to Bali” complaining of the pictures and his name appearing in the press and social media. Schon had apparently known Connor in Australia and his picture was apparently found by police on Connor's Facebook page.

Police subsequently change their most wanted list to include the name of Sara Connor (Australia) and David James Taylor (UK).

Police are attempting to question Taylor and Connor in the death of the policeman; while Connor has told police she was drunk at the time of the incident and remembers little, Taylor has refused to speak to police without being accompanied by a lawyer.

An autopsy of the dead policeman, Wayan Sudarsa, shows he died of head injuries. A broken beer bottle and a broken body board were found near the crime scene causing police to believe they may have been used in the homicide. A total of 42 wounds were found on the dead man’s body with finger marks on his arms suggesting he may have been held down in the course of the attack.

Connor’s handbag was found at the murder scene containing a driver’s license and credit card.

When police went to the Kubu Kauh Beach Inn in Kuta police where the couple had been staying, they discovered they had left the inexpensive inn. In examining their room they found blood trace in the room and toweling, and an abandoned rented motor scooter.

Inn workers said the couple left the home stay at 7:30 am on Wednesday morning.

The couple then moved to a home stay in the Jimbaran area of Bali before surrendering on Friday afternoon, August 19, 2016.

Formal charges have been filed by police against the couple.


Protecting the Mangroves
ITDC Summoned to Answer Charges of Polluting Protected Mangrove Area

Suspicions by District Officials (Kecamatan) that a green polluting substance flowing into the mangrove on the outskirts of Nusa Dua are originating from the waste management facility of the Indonesian Tourism Development Corporation (ITDC) have now been confirmed.

As reported by DenPost, the contamination of the protected lagoon area with seepage originating from the nearby sewage treatment plant operated by ITDC was confirmed by the chief of operations of the State-owned ITDC, AA Ratna Dewi, on Sunday, August 14, 2016.

Ratna, however, denied that the liquid flowing into the lagoon was sewage. She told the press that the liquid was sterilized water that had leaked from a nearby pipe. “The pipe cracked a week ago. It’s not sewage, but sterilized water used for irrigating gardens,” she said.

When quizzed by the press on the cause of the leaking pipe, Ratna expressed dismay, saying the pipe was buried at a depth of 1.5 meters. She postulated that roadside gutter work in the area might have punctured the piping.

Ratna said the ITDC had undertaken the temporary repair of the damaged pipe, with permanent repairs requiring more time.

The head of the Badung Environmental Agency (BLH-Badung), Ketut Sudarsana, confirmed he will check the location of the leak and take all appropriate action if a continuing contamination is discovered.


The Need for Chinese Checkers
Illegal Chinese Workers in Bali’s Travel Sector Accused of Destroying Island’s Image

Beritabali.com reports that the Indonesian Tour and Travel Association (ASITA) is urging the Provincial Administration of Bali to form a special task force to control foreigners working in serving Chinese tourists coming to Bali.

ASITA is complaining that many Chinese nationals are unlicensed and working illegally as tour guides in Bali.

Chandra Salim, speaking on behalf of the China-Committee of ASITA, said in Bali on Friday, August 19, 2016, “We are urging the Provincial Government of Bali to form a special task force to monitor Chinese foreigners who we observe are posing as tourists, but working as tour agents or selling cheap travel options online.”

Salim said that if this situation is left unchecked Bali’s tourism image and reputation will be damaged.

“(Our) tourism image will be damaged by the actions of these foreigners and their Online networks selling non-sustainable travel packages at price levels that make no sense. They construct packages that focus on shopping at art markets or galleries and limiting visits to tourist objects in order to increase commission levels. When the Chinese travelers return to their homeland, they complain about their travel experience in Bali.,” explained Salim.

Chandra Salim said that ASITA has written to the Provincial Government of Bali without success.

“The proposed task force is intended to supervise foreigners using tourist visas but who are, in fact, working in Bali as guides or selling travel packages online at very low prices,” said Salim.

ASITA claims illegal Chinese travel workers in Bali are numerous but the organization is powerless to move against them.

ASITA insists that a special task force is needed that will allow these individuals to be tracked down, prosecuted and eventually deported from Indonesia.

Related Article

Misguided Chinese


Does Anybody Know My Name?
Australian Fugitive Mounts his Own Defense in Denpasar, Bali Court on Multiple Immigration Violations

The troubled and sometimes troublesome Australian Shaun Edward Davidson on trial in Bali for serious immigration violations returned to court on Thursday, August 18, 2016, after summarily firing his legal counsel during the last court session.

As reported by RadarBali.com, Davidson continued to try to evade providing clear answers to the presiding judge and lead prosecutor handling the case. In accordance with his wishes, Davidson was acting as his own attorney, working through an interpreter.

The Australian confirmed to the court that he arrived in Indonesia in 2015 using a 30-day-visa-on-arrival. Staying in Bali way beyond the 30-day limitation of the visa, Davidson was eventually taken into custody at his hotel in Kuta.

Davidson told the court that he was a victim of a temporary stay permit (KITAS) scam arranged by an unnamed agent operating in the Jalan Poppies Lane area of Kuta where he claims to have paid Rp. 1.5 million to obtain a KITAS. He was purportedly given a plain piece of paper containing the name Eddie Lonsdale.

To the bemusement of the prosecutor and judge, Davidson claimed he did not question the Agent when he was given a KITAS in another person’s name. He claimed before the court that subsequent efforts to meet the Agent were unsuccessful.

Davidson explained that in Australia agents take care of immigration matters and he assumed this was also the case in Indonesia.

Shaun Davidson could also not offer an explanation why, when immigration asked him for his Australian passport, he presented a passport in the name of Michael John Bayman. Shaun said he found Bayman’s passport in a drawer of his room and decided to just use it.

At the time of his initial visit to Bali, Davidson was already being sought on criminal charges by Western Australian Police.

The court session will continue next week against Davidson who may serve 5-7 years in prison in prison in Australia on criminal charges after first serving a 5-7 years prison sentence in Bal ifor violating immigration rules and procedures.

Related Articles

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What’s in a Name, Anyway?

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No Decoration for this Driver
Horrendous Truck Crash on Jalan Bypass in Sanur Leaves Two Dead and a Score Injured

A tragic accident occurred on Tuesday, August 16, 2016, on Jalan Bypass Ngurah Rai at the KFC intersection in Sanur when an open truck carrying 12 stage decorators struck a tree and rolled before coming to a standstill against a second tree.

Dead at the scene were the driver Saparudin (28) and his assistant Agus Rianto (23) of Denpasar. The 12 decorators suffered severe injuries as they were thrown from the truck.

According to Beritabali.com, eyewitnesses to the early hour's accident say the truck was traveling at a high rate of speed and in a reckless manner when it struck the first tree. Police believe the driver may have been intoxicated at the time of the accident.

One observer on the scene said a container carrying tuak (moon shine) was found in the truck.

Saparudin, the driver and his assistant, Agus Rianto, were pronounced dead at the scene after being trapped in the truck’s cabin. Both men’s bodies suffered extensive broken bones and organ damage.

The decorators traveling in the back of the truck were rushed to Sanglah General Hospital suffering from severe injuries, with at least unconscious and in a coma.

    Dead at the Scene

  1. Saparudin (28)- Jalan Raya Pemogan No. 108, Denpasar.
  2. Agus Rianto (23)-Jalan Raya Pemogan No 108, Denpasar.

  3. Injured and Hospitalized

  4. Kadek Susana (32) Nusa Penida
  5. Kadek Suartawan (31)- Jalan Pulau Kawe No. 19, Denpasar.
  6. I Wayan Astra (29)-Jalan Raya Pemogan No. 108, Denpasar.
  7. Ketut Artawan-Jalan Raya Pemogan No. 108, Denpasar.
  8. Sahdan (40)-Jalan Raya Pemogan No 108, Denpasar.
  9. I Wayan Suwitra - (21) Lombok.
  10. Saidan - Lombok.
  11. Wayan Sukra-Jalan Pemogan, Gg Anggrek 4 No 4, Denpasar
  12. Basuki (30)- Jalan Tunjung Mekar, Kerobokan, Kuta Utara.
  13. I Wayan Miana
  14. Komang Budiasa from Sumbawa.
  15. Nengah Darmayasa (41) from Karangasem


Caught with Cats
East Javanese Man Caught at Gilimanuk, Bali Trying to Smuggle Jungle Cats and Civet Cats into Bali

Muh Eka Putra (24) from Jember, East Java, was apprehended at the Gilimanuk Port on Saturday, August 13, 2016, trying to illegally bring wild jungle cats and Civet Cats in Bali that were destined for Denpasar without the required quarantine documents.

As reported by NusaBali, officials discovered and confiscated the animals when Putra was undergoing an Identity Card check after crossing on the ferry from Java to Bali.

Eka Putra told officials he obtained the animals in Jember where a colleague had ordered him to purchase the cats online. The jungle cats were purchased at Rp. 250,000 each and the Civet Cats for Rp. 300,000 each.

The animals were taken by officials and placed at the Conservation Agency (KSDA) in Gilimanuk.

On Sunday, August 14, 2016, police in Jembrana confiscated a rare Hornbill bird from Wayan JG (49) in the village of Melaya. The Melaya citizen and Eka Putra now each face possible fines of Rp. 50 million and a prison term of one year.


Objecting at Go-Jek
Go-Jek Drivers Protest Changes in Transportation Fees and Bonus Schemes

NusaBali reports that hundred of Go-Jek drivers in Bali are on wildcat strike, protesting reductions in transportation tariffs charges by the online application and the higher revenue targets set for participating drivers.

On Monday, August 15, 2016, the drivers came in force to the Go-Jek office on Jalan Teuku Umar in Denpasar, Bali to voice their dissatisfaction.

One Go-Jek driver, Juni Siswanto, told the press that new policies by the Company’s management to lower tariffs have substantially reduced the earning expectations of its transporation partners.

“The rate reduction has been very large. Per kilometer, for instances, it’s now only Rp. 1.500. Where before we would earn Rp. 19,000 from a passenger, now we’re paid only Rp. 10,000. That’s before the office takes its Rp. 4,000 cut. Then we still have to pay fuel and food. We are suffering losses,” complained Juni Siswanto who has been on strike since Saturday, August 13, 2016.

Juni said that he and other drivers would remain on strike as long as the new, lower tariff remains in effect.

The Go-Jek drivers said other recent changes in how passengers are allocated is also making it difficult for them to earn a living. A new application has dramatically changed the way passengers are allocated, reducing the number of passengers a driver can acquire in a shift.

Go-Jek also applies a bonus point scheme requiring ambitious passenger targets be achieved to earn bonus payments. Drivers say that such a system might be justifiable in the highly competitive context of Jakarta, but Bali has no meaningful competitor to Go-Jek making the point system unnecessary and burdensome.

A member of Go-Jek’s management in Bali, who preferred not to be named, confirmed that the driver’s complaints would be passed on to the Company’s head office Jakarta, who has complete control over policies regarding tariffs and bonuses.

Similar protests by Go-Jek drivers are reported in Jakarta, Bandung and North Sumatra.


A Case of Mistaken Identity
Police Admit they Initially Placed the Picture and Name of the Wrong Foreigner in Search for Those Involved in the Death of Balinese Cop

NusaBali.com reports that Bali police have acknowledged that the picture of a Thomas Schon, initially identified as playing a role in the murder of a Balinese policeman, was done in error.

Police say the photo of Thomas Schon was taken from the Facebook Account of Sara Connor when they incorrectly assumed Schon to be the male companion seen on CCTV footage of Connor near the scene of the brutal murder of Indonesian police officer Sub-inspector I Wayan Sudarsa (55).

Protests from Schon who claims to have never been to Bali and threats that he would take legal action against the Indonesian police, caused police to correct their earlier posting and place the picture of David James Taylor (UK) as the man they were seeking in the murder.

Both Taylor and Connor are now under arrest with Bali police charging the twoin the death of the policeman.

Police have told the local press that they intend to correct the original incorrrect posting on their official website and social media showing Schon’s name and picture.

Commenting separately on the death of a Balinese policeman, Governor Made Mangku Pastika has urged police to exercise extreme caution in carrying out their duties. Pastika pointed out this is the second recent murder of a policeman in Bali blamed on tourist visitors.

The Governor, who once served as Provincial Chief of Police for Bali, suggests police should perform patrols in the company of another police officer as a precaution against similar attacks or attacks targeted against them by terrorist elements.


Costly Coffin Nail
Indonesia Considers Increasing Price of Cigarettes to Rp. 50,000 a Pack

The Director-General of Customs and Excise (DJBC) is in the process of studying the feasibility of doubling the cost of a pack of cigarettes in Indonesia to Rp. 50,000.

Liputan6.com reports officials must first consider the economic aspects of such a price increase. The Director General DJBC, Heru Pambudi, says the Rp. 50,000 per pack price must be looked at not only from the aspect of the  impact on the public’s health but also the asundry effects on employment, agriculture and the industrial sector.

Prambudi also expressed concern that a price increase that is too significant will foster a “black market” in illegal or smuggled cigarettes. He said he hoped any increase in the cost of cigarettes would be done in an incremental way over time in order to avoid any negative effects on the economy or public order, worrying that a 2.5 times increase in price done all at once  is ill-considered.

Cigarettes currently cost an average of Rp. 20,000 per pack. Principals in the Indonesian cigarette industry predict havoc will result if the price is increased to Rp. 50,000 per pack. In response, anti-smoking advocates say a rapid increase would reduce smoking by as must at 60% and result in tremendous savings in terms of public health and work force productivity costs.

While cigarette taxes will increase in October, the actual amount of that increase has yet to be decided by the government.


Suspected of Murder
David Taylor and Sarah Connor Now Formally Named as Suspects in Murder of a Bali Policeman

As reported by BaliPost.com, Police in Bali have now officially named Australian Sara Connor and U.K. national David James Taylor as suspects in the death of Police Sub-inspector Wayan Sudarsa, killed in the early hours of Wednesday, August 17, 2016.

Taylor and Connor are now being held on remand for 20 days at Police Headquarters, a period the police will almost certainly extend further by application to prosecutors.

rsquo;s status as suspects was imposed by police on Saturday, August 20, 2016, according to a spokesman for the Bali Police.

The two have also been brought to the Tijata Hospital for a complete medical and forensic examination that will form part of the evidence file. Police claim that the examination provided further incriminating evidence against the two foreigners.

The man and woman have been charged with homicide under sections 338 – paragraphs 170 and paragraphs 351 of the criminal code (KUHP) that carry a maximum penalty of 15 years in prison.

Had police found evidence of premeditation in the murder, the two could have been charged in with crimes punishable by death before a firing squad.


Setting Things Right Again with the Cosmos
Legian Village Community Perform Ritual Cleansing of Murder Scene Where Bali Policeman Died

RadarBali.com reports that the residents of the traditional enclave of Legian, Kuta have conducted Bali-Hindu religious ceremonies at the scene of the murder of Police Sub-inspector Wayan Sudarsa (53), who died on Wednesday, August 17, 2016.

A spiritual cleaning – known locally as a “pecaruan” is intended to rid an area of any lingering ill intentions and return balance to the cosmos.

The ritual head of the Legian Village, I Gusti Ngurah Sudiarsa, explained that the pecaruan ceremony is the sacred responsibility of the entire community to maintain the “purity” of their surroundings. The simple “caru” ceremony held on the beach was funded entirely at the expense of the village members.

The villagers all contributed to pay the cost of a pecaruan eka sata cleansing ritual and its prelude-  prayascita durmangala ceremony, to put worshippers in a pure state of mind.

Attending the religious ceremonies were village elders, banjar officials, the village chief (Lurah), representative of community organizations, military personnel and members of the police.

Sudiarsa, who also serves as a member of the Badung House of Representatives (DPRD-Badung), shared that additional, more elaborate ceremonies will be required timed to take place with the annual ceremonies held on the anniversary of the Pura Kahyangan Tiga – the three inter-related temples found standing in every traditional village.


Bangkok Near the Bali Bypass
Too Good Not to Share: DD Warung in Sanur – Home of Authentic Thai Cuisine

Some of Bali’s best eateries are off found “off the beaten track,” in areas hidden from the main flow of tourist visitors and frequented mainly by local residents.

In order for these restaurants to survive removed from the more lucrative tourist trails, these “hidden gems” need a consistent formula of good food at affordable prices to attract and retain a loyal local following.

For this reason, some of the best places to eat in Bali can be found in places like downtown Denpasar or the back streets of Sanur.

ad on discovered  Facebook, I recently found my way to DD Warung located on Jalan Batur Sari 47C in Sanur. Because there is little rhyme or reason to how addresses are numbered on Jalan Batur Sari, I suggest you turn off Jalan Bypass Ngurah Rai in the direction of Denpasar at the Jalan Tirta Nadi II traffic light. When Tirta Nadi II quickly comes to an end, turn right on Jalan Muktisari that quickly becomes Jalan Batursari.

Look for the decorative Thai-style lights on the right hand side of the road.

Lost? Telephone +62-(0)81 339265 156 and ask their helpful staff to guide your final approach.

arung is small and cozy, perhaps seating no more than 40 guests or so if every table and chair were occupied. There’s a section of casual seating for nibblers and drinkers or more formal tables and chairs for serious dining.

It appears musical entertainment in the form of a guitarist-singer is also on tap many nights.

But I digress and the main draw of DD Warung is the exceptional and very affordable Thai cuisine prepared by the amiable Ms. DD.

Starters and finger food options include: Thai spring rolls wrapped in rice paper; Yam Nua – a spice beef salad; or an equally spicy green papaya salad.

There are two soup courses to choose from. The ubiquitous favorite of Tom Yom Goong – a flavorsome spicy-sour feast of prawns and straw mushrooms floating a broth of lemon grass, fish sauce and galangal or Tom Kha Kai – a Thai Chicken Galangal Soup immersed in succulent coconut milk.

Curry lovers can choose from a Green Chicken Curry, a Peranakan Penang Curry, Yellow Curry or a Thai Massaman Chicken Curry. Like with most dishes at DD Warung, the degree of “hotness” preferred can be specified when ordering.

During my visit we enjoyed Pad Ga Pow Mod Ka Dow. DD Warung offers variations on the traditional ground pork version with alternatives available in beef, seafood or chicken. Equally delicious was Kai Med Ma Maung – a dish of chicken and cashews cooked with onions, sweet soy sauce, chili and honey.

Visit their Facebook page to view the entire menu where mains average around Rp. 60,000 net.

DD Warung – great food and affordable prices in the heart of Sanur.

DD Warung Face Book Page

DD Warung
Jalan Batur Sari 47C
Sanur, Bali
Open Monday-Saturday for Lunch (11:00 am – 3:00 pm) and Dinner (5:30 pm – 9:00 pm)
Closed Sundays
Telephone +62-(0)81339 265 156


A Day Dedicated to the Endangered
Bali Safari and Marine Park Salutes International Orangutan Day and International Elephant Day

Bali Safari & Marine Park held a joint celebration in honor of International Orangutan Day and International Elephant Day on Friday, August 19, 2016.

In keeping with a long-established tradition at The Park, 50 children from the Yayasan Pelangi Anak Negeri – a foster home for orphaned or abandoned children, were invited to spend a fun-filled day with the large herd of Sumatran elephants and families of orangutans who make the 40-hectare nature park their home.

Among the activities prepared in anticipation of the children’s arrival were visits to the Park’s headline Animal show, Tiger Show and Elephant Show, together with special interactive sessions with the elephants and orangutans.

To foster an understanding and appreciation of the animal kingdom, the Park’s educators also created challenging games that were enthusiastically received by the kids from Pelangi Anak Negeri. Each child also went home with a useful set of school supplies.

William Santoso, General Manager of the Bali Safari & Marine Park, commenting on the visit, and International Elephant Day and International Orangutan Day, said: “The commemoration of Orangutan Day and Elephant Day is intended to remind both the visitors to the Bali Safari & Marine Park and the world at large of the increasing threat of extinction faced by the Asian and African Elephants, and the Asian Orangutan. The future existence of these animals depends on those steps we put in place today. On this occasion, we hope those who care for the world’s wildlife will recommit to the international campaign to protect and preserve elephants and orangutans. On each of the many days set aside in support of international wildlife conservation held at the Bali Safari & Marine Park, we always invite groups representing the younger generation to share with them the need to be concerned and care for wildlife.”

International Union for the Conservation of Nation (IUCN) (Red List IUCN 2006/IUCN Red List 2007) has classified the Borneo Orangutan as an “endangered species,” meanwhile, the Sumatran Orangutan is at even greater threat and classified as “critically endangered.”

In January 2012, IUCN classified elephants in Indonesia “critically endangered,” just one level below extinction. The number of Sumatran Elephants is now half of the 5,000 found in the wild in 1985, with experts estimating only 2,400 – 2,800 elephants remaining in nature.

ng with the days set aside on the calendar to honor the individual species found in the wild kingdom, World Elephant Day and World Orangutan Day are designated to draw world attention to the plight of these endangered species. It is clear that mankind at once poses the greatest threat to the world’s wildlife and, at the same time, mankind remains wildlife’s only hope for continuing survival. While elephants and orangutans are protected under law, rule and laws are not enough to ensure these charismatic species will remain for coming generations to know and enjoy. The conservation of the elephant and the orangutan requires the concerted and comprehensive participation of all parties, both in the field and in the political realm, to ensure final success.


Time to Stand Together
Generosity.com Fund Established for Family of Police Sub-Inspector Wayan Sudarsa Killed on Kuta Beach on Wednesday, August 17, 2017

A Personal Note from Balidiscovery.com

In the early morning hours of Wednesday, August 17, 2016, a 53-year-old officer from the Kuta Police Precinct was brutally killed on Kuta Beach. More than 39 wounds were found on the body of Second Sub-inspector I Wayan Sudarsa who was found face down on the sandy beach.

Police have taken an Australian woman and a U.K. man into custody, in connection with the murder, who will be charged in the homicide.

Wayan Sudarsa left a widow and two children who now need financial support to meet living and educational costs, and to pay for Bali-Hindu ceremonies that will ensure the peaceful repose of their father and husband.

On an island where we are very quick to launch humanitarian funding campaigns for hapless tourists in hospital who come to the Island, get drunk and fall off a motorcycle or to fund an operation for a wounded stray dog, we desire to step up and set up a special fund to aid the family of the fallen policeman.

To donate does not require anyone to take a position regarding the guilt or innocence of the two foreign tourists now being charged in the policeman’s death. Such a fund would simply be a place for foreigners and Indonesians alike to “gotong royong” (mutually cooperate) and provide a small degree of help to a family who have lost a husband and father. At the same this fund will be an opportunity for past visitors to Bali, Indonesian residents and Bali’s large expat community to acknowledge the significant duty and sacrifice of Bali’s much-maligned constabulary.

The funds will be transparently managed and accounted for by Bali’s leading humanitarian group – Solemen Indonesia (http://www.solemen.org) with 100% of the money collected to fund the needs of the policemen’s wife and two children.

Solemen Indonesia has a history of past contact with Officer Wayan Sudarsa who had taken an active and concerned role in helping the community, including a major role in an intervention for a homeless Irish man found wandering the streets of Kuta in a disoriented condition.

Let’s stay on topic. We’re only talking here about doing the right thing for the surviving family of a dead Balinese policeman. For present purposes, we have no interest in speculation on how events unfolded on that fateful night on Kuta Beach or on the quality of Indonesian policing. Similarly, now is not the time and this is not the place to rehash personal stories of victimization at the hands of the Indonesian Police. This is not about race or corruption. We wish to keep this simple and clean: make it about aiding a Balinese family that has suffered an unspeakable loss and taking a tragic turn of events and discovering a commonality of interest by aiding the family of a fallen Balinese policeman.

Generosity.com Link for Donation to Family of Police Officer Wayan Surdara


 
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