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Sanur Raya No. 27
Jl. By Pass Ngurah Rai,
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Bali News by Bali Update
BALI UPDATE #941 - 15 September 2014

IN THIS UPDATE


Bye, Bye, Birdie
Bali-bound Batavia Air Flight Makes Emergency Return to Kupang After Colliding with a Flock of Birds.

A Boeing 737-500 operated by Batavia Air on route from Kupang to Bali was forced to make an emergency return to Kupang after colliding with a flock of shortly after take off.

The incident took place on Monday, October 3, 2011, shortly after the plane's departure at 3:30 p.m. with 127 passengers on board.

As reported by the National News Agency Antara, the passengers on the jet were diverted to a flight departing Kupang at 8:15 pm on the same day that landed in Bali at 7:15 local time.

“In the beginning,” said Dewi a passenger on the flight, “ the passengers panicked when they smelt something burning. Maybe a bird that was hit by the plane was sucked into the plane's engines.”

Dewi told the press that there were no injuries suffered by the passengers on the flight.

A stewardess made an announcement to the passengers that the plane would be making a precautionary return to Kupang due to the collision with birds.


Monstrous Memories
The Balinese Art of Ogoh-Ogoh – Latest Book Launched by the Bali Purnati Center for the Arts.

Chris Ball, Leonard Lueras and The Bali Purnati Center For The Arts (Yayasan Bali Purnati) are launching The Balinese Art Of Ogoh-Ogoh, a large-format book which documenting one of Bali’s most unique art forms - the Ogoh Ogoh.

The papier mâché statues or ogoh-ogoh - depicting demons and other characters, form part of the traditional observance of Nyepi – the Balinese day of absolute silence that ushers in a new year on the Bali-Hindu calendar. Hoisted onto the shoulders of village men and boys, the elaborately made statues are crafted in the weeks leading up to the annual celebration in the community halls (banjars) of local villages.

Two years in preparation, The Balinese Art of Ogoh-Ogoh features a foreword by the Dr. Bulantrisna Djelantik, an Introduction by New Zealand ethnomusicologist Vaughan Hatch, and photographs by 33 leading Balinese and foreign photographers.

The book was edited and designed by the author-photographer-publisher Leonard Lueras and produced by longtime Bali resident Chris Ball.

The premiere edition of this book is presented in a formal poleng cloth slipcase with the titles on its jacket and hard cover gold-foil-stamped,.
The book’s 208 pages were designed in a portrait format printed in five colors with many images enhanced by spot varnish on 190 gram art paper.

For more information [email


The Greek Connection
Bali Customs Officials Arrest Greek National Nikolaus Boukidis with Large Haul of Methamphetamine.

Bali Customs and Exile Officials continue a long series of arrest of foreigners, posing as tourists while smuggling narcotics, have captured a 36-year-olf Greek national, Nikolaus Boukidis, with 4.3 kilograms of methamphetamine.

Boukidis arrived on a Qatar Airways flight from Doha on Monday, October 3, 2011 at 7:45 p.m.. A subsequent customs check found the narcotics concealed on the inner layers of the man’s suitcases.

The head of the Bali Custom’s office, I Made Wijaya, placed the value of the smuggled drugs at Rp. 10 billion (US$1.1 million).

Prosecutors have yet to formally charge the man.



Rising Indignation Over Mulia Hotel Project
Bali Lawmakers Up in Arms on Wanted Fugitive's Role in Mulia Hotel Project.

Beritabali.com reports that the Committee for the Eradication of Corruption (KPK) has been asked by the Bali House of Representatives (DPR-Bali) to investigate the development of the Mulia Hotel project in Bali, believed to be owned by Djoko Soegiarto Tjandra.

Tjandra is a fugitive of the law, listed by the Indonesian police and Interpol for criminal involvement in Bank fraud, and believed to be living in Singapore.

The massive Mulia Hotel Project occupies a 26-hectare site on Geger beach in South Bali. The project holds a building permit (IMB) issued by the Badung regency to PT Mulia Graha Tata Lestari, a company once owned by Tjandra, but with ownership now transferred to Viady Sutojo in March 2011.

The chairman of Commission I of the DPRD-Bali, Made Arjaya, says the “big question” is how it was possible for Djoko Tjandra to change the ownership of his company while being actively sought by police. Arjaya said that if this change of ownership actually did occur, he suspects this was accomplished with the assistance of government officials in direct contact with the fugitive Tjandra.

“How is it possible that the regent of Badung did not know that Djoko Tjandra was a fugitive? If Djoko Tjandra came here (Bali), then SBY (the President) has been tricked with a fugitive managing to freely enter and exit the Country. Secondly, if he is in Singapore, it means that our officials knew details of his whereabouts. Why didn’t they report this? This means that they participated in the protection and concealment of a fugitive,” said Arjaya.

Arjaya is calling on the governor to review all the permits held by PT Mulia Graha Tata Lestari.

Public Protests

Tens of demonstrators from a group calling itself “People's Group Against Corruption (EMAK)” marched on the Bali House of Representatives on Tuesday, October 4, 2011, in support of legislators’ calls for a thorough and consistent investigation of the Hotel Mulia Resort project.

The delegation was welcomed by the chairman of Commission I of the DPRD-Bali, Made Arjaya; the chairman of the special committee to review the RTRW zoning law, Wayan Disel Astawa; and the chairman of the Honors Committee, Gede Sudarma.

The peacefu protestors delivered a four-point statement to the House in support of calls to bust open the arrangements surrounding licensing of the Hotel Mulia project owned by Djoko Tjandra.

The coordinator of the protest, Sumardiarta Nata, said efforts by the province to save Bali via the 2009 RTRW Zoning law are being challenged by regional leaders claiming to act in the name of public welfare. “In fact,” said Nata, “these leaders are exploiting Bali’s land for private gain in the name of ‘public welfare.’ The clearest example of this is the granting of permits from the regional government to Djoko Tjandra, a fugitive in the Bank Liquidity scandal, allowing him to building a luxury hotel on Geger beach, South Kuta, Badung.”

Nata depicted the issuing of these permits has having wounded the public’s sense of justice that resents the fact that this land is now controlled by a fugitive.

“We support the DPRD-Bali, asking that they take steps to bust open the case of Djoko Tjandra who is allowed to build a hotel in Bali. We hope the at the House will investigate in order that all facts are revealed, so anyone behind the process that granted these permits can be fired,” said Nata.

Arjaya promised that the House would coordinate with the regional government of Badung, prosecutors and the police to completely investigate this case,

Said Arjaya: “This just doesn’t make senses that land in excess of 7.5 hectare (sic) including shorefront is able to bar access to the beach by the public. Bali is a part of the sovereign Republic of Indonesia, it’s impossible such a large tract of land can be controlled by an individual who is a fugitive of the law – wanted as a major criminal in the Bank Indonesia liquidity scandal.”

He promised that over the coming three months the DPRD-Bali would undertake a review of the case, examining how permits were issued, ownership of land and possible violations of the 2009 RTRW zoning law.

Related Article

[Brouhaha at the Mulia]
 
 


Strawberries and Cream
3-Day English-Style Garden Party Set for South Bali October 28-30, 2011

The lawns of Taman Bhagawan in South Bali at Tanjung Benoa will be transformed into the site for a quintessential English Garden Party incorporating delightful Balinese accents.

Organized by Phoenix Communications and Taman Bhagawan, the Bali Garden Party will be held over three days, October 28-30, 2011, providing participants with elegant and relaxing days of music from the main stage, classical string quartet music, jazz, dance, choirs and cabaret. Meanwhile, the main lawn will provide all-day dining opportunities from some of Bali’s top restaurants, bars and resorts. 

For the children there will be designated areas with games, shows, magic, animals, painting, music, dance and rides. Supervised by “Bali with Kids,” children from 3 to 10 years will enjoy a constantly changing program on stage, and games on the lawn adjacent.

In order not to forget the Bali community and the environment, special invitees will join the Bali Garden Party via stands operated by leading non-governmental organizations (NGO) promoting goods, services and ideas intended to make Bali more sustainable.

Another interesting aspect of the Bali Garden Party will be a series of “Talk Shows” where prominent leaders in the fields of cuisine, the environment and social justice will partake in a lively interchange of ideas and opinions.
There will also be twice-daily fashion shows, evening cabarets and jazz performances.

Attractions on the beach will also include wine tastings,  spa croquet and a tea house ofering the de riguer tea with cucumber sandwhiches of a traditional English tea party.

Related Website
[Bali Garden Party
 


Forgotten Souvenirs
Drop in Bali Handicraft Exports to Europe, the U.S.A. and Japan Seen as ‘Dangerous'’

The ongoing crisis among European and the U.S. economies is making itself felt among handicraft producers in Bali who report exports are down 7%.

Data provided by the Department of Industry and Trade, as reported by Beritabali.com, estimate that the value of yearly handicraft production from Bali to Europe and the U.S.A. have a total value of US$300 million.

The head of the Bali Department of Industry and Trade, Gede Darmaja, on Tuesday, October 4, 2011, said the 7% downturn in handicraft exports was “dangerous,” bearing in mind that nearly 90% of Bali’s handicraft exports are destined for Europe, the U.S.A. and Japan.

He described the status the handicraft export business in Bali at the moment as “critical” with ripple effects that will be felt on levels of unemployment on the island.

He also waned that upstream supply industries for the handicraft sector, such as wood and silver supply, will also be affected by the current downturn.

Darmaja revealed that while waiting for markets to Improve in Europe, America and Japan his office would focus on increasing sales to other markets in Saudi Arabia and the Middle East.


When a Good Shepherd Goes Bad
North Bali Community Undertakes Elaborate Offerings and Drowns a Cow After Local Man Caught In 'Flagrante Delicto' with a Cow

Bali Post reports that Sangit in Buleleng, North Bali was awash with frantic activity on Tuesday, October 4, 201, as the entire village gathered on the ocean’s shores to participate in the ritual drowning at sea of a cow.

The ill-fated cow, sentenced to an early, watery grave, was known to have recently been sexually violated by a 25-year-old man from the village, identified only by the initials “MS.”

Sexual concourse with an animal is viewed by most Balinese as “salah karma” entailing grave consequences in the order of the cosmos. The incident between the man and the bovine occurred in September, and became known to the entire village who termed the encounter a “disaster” demanding group prayers and that special offerings be made.

According to the village chief or “Klian” of Sangsit, Made Subakti, the required cleansing ceremony demanded the drowning in the ocean of the cow that had been known carnally by MS. On Tuesday morning, the hapless animal was ritually cleansed at a village temple and then dressed in colorful cloths, symbolizing the adornments of a "bride” to be wed to MS.

Afterwards, the cow was loaded into a local boat, hauled out to sea and pushed overboard where the animal was allowed to drown. Meanwhile, MS was compelled to remove his clothing which were symbolically thrown into the ocean with “his bride” to represent his own drowning. Fresh clothing were given the man on the boat who, when he returned to shore, was considered ritually cleansed of his sin.

The entire ceremony cost around Rp.40 million (US$4,450) and was paid via contributions by all members of the village. Surprisingly, MS, known to be a man of limited financial means, was not asked to make any financial contribution for the ceremonies by his fellow villagers.

The traditional and ritual head of the village, Jro Gede Segara, told the Bali Post that the act committed by the village member was done while the perpetrator was under a spell and not conscious of his actions. ”The incident was part of a natural cycle committed unintentionally. (Because of this) the village must receive the consequences as matter of fate,” explained Segara.


Losing Paradise in Bali
Ubud Writer-Photographer Raises Concerns for Bali’s Future via Huffington Post

Last week, well known photographer-writer and long-time Bali resident, Rio Helmi, wrote a thought provoking and timely article for the [Huffington Post].

In Balidiscovery.com's efforts to share thoughtful voices from the community addressing the future of Bali, we are piublishing Rio Helmi’s article below:

Losing Paradise In Bali

Bali's booming reputation as a must-go international destination comes at a heavy price. This year critical articles about the island's infrastructure woes have run in both the [Wall Street Journal] and  [Time]. The head of the Bali chapter of the Indonesian business association APINDO, Panundiana Khun, stated early this year that land in Bali was no longer economically suitable for agrarian use and should rather be used for the tourism industry and that Balinese farmers were better off transmigrating. The subsequent uproar had him scrambling to 'clarify' his position days later, claiming a misquote.

True, the carrying capacity of the island has hit critical mass. Every high school kid in Bali knows tensions over water shortage (in five star hotels, each room consumes around five times a whole Balinese family's average of 200 liters a day) and disappearing agricultural land (more than 1000 hectares are 'converted' or urbanized annually). A booming population (3.9 million today vs 2.4 in 1978) means tough times ahead.

What caused the uproar in response to Khun's apparent gaffe is a long smoldering resentment in the Balinese community towards the excesses of the tourism industry and foreign investment, especially since government approval for Bakrie Nirwana Resort on land considered within the spiritual buffer zone of one of Bali's holiest sites, Tanah Lot, was rammed through during the Suharto era despite island wide protests. In the 1990s a high ranking (non-Balinese) official in Indonesia's Department of Tourism commented that "Bali doesn't belong to the Balinese or to you who live here anymore, it belongs to everybody in the world."

Everyone acknowledges wealth has been generated by tourism, but many point out the imbalance in the distribution thereof, and the ecologically disastrous nature of many projects.

More pointed is the discussion of identity and cultural rights. A Balinese's spiritual life centers around his or her ancestors: what is inherited in terms of tradition (material and spirit being tightly interwoven), and what to leave for the next generation. Once principally an agrarian society, the emotional bond to inherited land is linked not only to personal but also to communal spiritual well being.

Most homes in a village are the birthright of the families that inhabit it, but unlike farmland, the land actually belongs to the community - known as "karang desa" ('village compound') it cannot be sold - ensuring all members of the community are provided for, and maintaining social integrity and cohesion. Other land that is inherited can be sold yet represents a deep link to the ancestors, who are worshiped everyday in the family temple. Then there is what is considered sacred property of temples, "laban pura", which is also their spiritual buffer zone. Currently there is a heated public debate regarding rezoning the laban pura. Temples, the related ceremonies and 'tithes' all are part of the glue that holds Balinese society together. The most bitter feuds in Bali revolve around land.

The passion the current ongoing debate on Bali's zoning stirs up indicates that this is something of a symbolic last stand for Balinese culture as a living, breathing entity. An ongoing real estate boom has meant more and more rice fields are replaced by luxury villas for expats. The other day when I remarked that the days of the Balinese farmer seem to be over, a Balinese journalist friend, Wayan Juniartha, commented: "No, actually they will remain farmers, but they will be tenant farmers. The Japanese and Taiwanese have been buying up land, not to build villas but as an investment in agriculture".

While the government fails the all-important agricultural sector in Bali, foreign investors are injecting capital into it, meaning the Balinese will no longer own their inheritance.

Why has it taken so long for the Balinese community to act? Part of the problem is that though there is a tightly woven fabric of Balinese culture, the same weave also keeps the Balinese "in their place," separated by caste and clan. As one vocal, high caste Balinese activist spluttered:
"As soon as someone voices an opposing opinion everything breaks down into camps defined by caste and clan. If a person feels attacked because of his policies etc, he maneuvers through the loyalty lines of caste and clan. We don't have enough freethinking intellectuals on this island! That's why activism is so poor in Bali."

For sure Balinese culture will continue to be featured in presentations and museums, and will continue to find a market. Just recently in the so-called cultural center of Bali, Ubud, the [Philip Kotler Marketing Museum]  was launched - much to the bemusement of most locals who have no idea who the man is. The much quoted slogan of Balinese communal philosophy, Tri Hita Karana (which refers to the threefold relationship between man and god, man and fellow man, man and environment) will continue to be quoted academically, it might end even up as a marketing display in the museum. But who will be left to live and breathe this philosophy?


14-Year-Old Australian Arrested in Bali
Teenage New South Wales Boy Arrested in Bali in Possession of Marijuana

A 14-year-old boy from New South Wales, Australia is currently in police custody in Bali after reportedly being arrested with 3.6 gram bag of marijuana on a Kuta street.

According to Tempo Interaktif, the boy is the youngest Australian ever arrested in Bali. Police are reportedly keeping the child in an isolation room at the police headquarters, separated from other prisoners.

Indonesian law does not permit the publication of the names of minors involved in criminal acts. Press reports suggest the boy has been traumatized by his arrest, crying continuously and unable to eat.

The boy, on holiday in Bali with his parents, was returning from a massage when he paid Rp. 250,000 (US$28) to a local man who reportedly told the Australian he had not eaten and needed money.

Formal charges have not been laid in the case that is still under investigation by police.

Officials form the Australian Department of Foreign Affairs have been ordered by Foreign Minister Kevin Rudd to make the boy’s case a top priority and seek an early release of the child.


The Indonesian Voyage of Arthur Rimbaud
‘Rimbaud in Java, the Last Voyage’ the Latest Book by Bali-Based Author Jamie James Launched at Ubud Writers and Readers Festival

At a book launch held in conjunction with the Ubud Writers and Readers Festival, Bali-based author Jamie James premiered Rimbaud in Java: The Lost Voyage - a unique and refreshing non-fiction account of the fabled French poet’s time on the Indonesian island.

Rimbaud in Java began life as a novel but James despaired of ever writing believable dialogue for the unpredictable genius. Instead, the author has produced a 128-page book that defies conventional classification, proffering a rich blend of biography, criticism and thought-travel. James reviews everything that is known about Arthur Rimbaud’s time in Java and imaginatively reconstructs what the poet must have seen and what he might have done, vividly recreating life in 19th-century Java along the way.

The launch of the book is the culmination of nearly a decade of research and writing for the novelist and critic, Jamie James, who says Rimbaud’s poetry has been a huge influence for him since childhood. “I’ve been fascinated by Arthur Rimbaud since I was a high-school student in Houston, Texas. His poems opened doors of perception that gave me access to the great world beyond my suburban cul-de-sac.”

The owner of Editions Didier Millet (EDM), Didier Millet, said of the publication, “As soon as I heard Jamie’s plans for the book, I) was eager to publish what sounded like an extremely interesting proposition. I am pleased that the final product has even exceeded my expectations.”

Eminent critics in the literary world have been quick to praise the ingenuity of James’ efforts. Zadie Smith, in her final New Books column in Harper’s, lauded the book’s style and content, even suggesting it may belong to a new genre in itself: “…a high wire performance…The book shines a torch down the well of the nineteenth century and illuminates a little patch on an inner wall near the bottom… Microhistory? If it’s the beginning of a trend, I won’t complain.” Edmund White commented, "I loved every page of it. I now have clear images of Rimbaud in Java. Jamie James is a very interesting writer at every moment"; whilst Jan McGirk wrote in the Huffington Post, “…an intriguing new book about this wild-child poet that leaps boundaries.”

Rimbaud in Java: The Lost Voyage is Jamie James’ eighth book. His other works include The Snake Charmer; Andrew & Joey: A Tale of Bali; The Music of the Spheres: Music, Science, and the Natural Order of the Universe; Other Origins: The Search for the Giant Ape in Human Prehistory; and Eccentrics: A Study in Sanity and Strangeness.

Prior to moving to Bali in 1999, James worked as a critic for The New Yorker. He contributes to many leading publications, including The New Yorker, Men's Journal, The Atlantic Monthly, Condé Nast Traveler, National Geographic Adventure, and major newspapers such as the New York Times, Wall Street Journal and Los Angeles Times.

Rimbaud in Java: The Lost Voyage costs US$14.95 and is available in stores across Southeast Asia now.

The book will soon be available in the US and UK from mid-October. ISBN 9789814260824.

The book is also available in e-book format at [www.kobobooks.com

[Rimbaud in Java: The Lost Voyage


Delayed Departure for Manila
Philippine Woman Sentenced to Eight Years for Smuggling Sabu-Sabu into Bali

A 32-year-old Philippine woman, Maria Cecilia Lopez, has been sentenced to eight years in prison after being found guilty of trying to smuggle 324.87 grams of methamphetamine through Bali’s airport.

According to the National News Agency Antara, the woman was also fined Rp. 2 billion (US$222,000) that if unpaid will add an additional 6 months to Lopez’s sentence.

The sentence meted out by the courts was two years less than the 10 years sought by prosecutors.

The woman has accepted the sentence of the court. Prosecutors, however,  have the option of appealing the sentence if they consider the punishment too lenient.

Lopez was arrested on April 15, 2011, at Bali’s Ngurah Rai Airport after disembarking from a Thai Airway's flight. A search conducted by customs officials that included a USG scan eventually revealed 41 capsules concealed in the woman’s digestive tract.

Lopez freely admitted to the crime, claiming she was to have received US$2,400 for smuggling the drugs into Bali and transporting them for eventual delivery to Jakarta. She also admitted that prior to her Bali arrest she had successfully smuggled drugs form Bangkok to Africa. 


Training Event and Meeting Managers
5-Day International Course on Convention and Meeting Management to be Conducted by SIPCO December 3-7, 2011

Operating convention organizer courses for Bali’s travel industry since 1990, the Society of Indonesian Professional Convention Organizers (SIPCO) will be conducting an Advanced Convention Organizers Course in Bali and Singapore December 3-7, 2011.

Covering the major aspects of professional meeting and conference management, the scheduled for this years course:

December 3- 4, 2011: 2 Full Day Courses in Bali
December 5, 2011: Half-day course in Bali & Departure for Singapore
December 6, 2011: Site inspections and discussions in Singapore Zoo December 7, 2011: Depart Singapore and return to Bali

The intensive course, taught by senior members of the conference and meeting industry costs:

SIPCO Members: Rp. 7,450,000 per person (US$828)
Non-Members: Rp. 7,950,000 per person (US$884)

The price includes:
  • 2.5 day of course work in Bali
  • 3 days / 2 nights accommodation in Singapore based on twin sharing
  • Course hand outs
  • Course Certificate
  • Return air ticket Denpasar – Singapore 
  • Airport tax at Ngurah Rai and Singapore airport
  • Return Airport transfers from Changi Airport to the hotel in Singapore
  • 2 x breakfast 
  • 1 x lunch 
  • Transportation in Singapore based on program

Terms & Conditions:
  • Reservation and confirmation with full payment should be made before October 21, 2011 at the latest with full payment
  • Payment is non refundable
  • Payment by credit card will incur a 3% surcharge 
Not included are all personal expenses (porters, unscheduled meals, telephone calls, Internet.

For more information contact the SIPCO secretariat (Mrs Aridewi), at telephone +62-(0)361 - 854 2859, or ++62-(0)81 916369 707.
 


Building Bridges Between People in Bali
Exhibition of Charcoal and Oil Drawings at Bridges Bali, Ubud October 15 – Mid-January 2012 in Support of The John Fawcett Foundation.

Renowned artist John Van Der Sterren was born in Java in 1938, on the eve of the approaching World War. Born from Dutch ancestry, his early years as a boy were spent on a tea estate in West Java where his Father served as manager.

After surviving the tumultuous war years, at the age of 13 in 1951, Van Der Sterren’s family immigrated to New Zealand. He pursued artistic training in his new home and met the well-known New Zealand painter, Cedric Savage, who taught him how to use oil paints.

As a young man Van Der Sterren worked in the advertising industry while participating in private exhibitions of his art during in his spare time. After a successful exhibition in Indonesia in 1993, Van Der Sterren  became a full-time artist, quickly earning a reputation as a leading landscape and portrait painter in the Fauvist style.

He has spent the past two decades traveling around Southeast Asia, Europe, New Zealand and Australia recording his travels in art. He has exhibited in Indonesia, Thailand, France, Morocco and Singapore.

His current exhibition to be held at Bridges in Ubud, Bali will provide important financial support to The John Fawcett Foundation’s work in curing blindness by providing cataract operations. The Foundation offers essential medical assistance to economically disadvantaged Indonesias. Patients are treated free of charge with reference to religion, political or ethnic affiliation.

                          John Van Der Sterren at Bridges Bali
            An Exhibition of Charcoal Drawings and Oil Paintings

                           October 15th through mid-January 2011

                                            Bridges Bali
                Jalan Campuhan (near Museum Antonio Blanco)
                                              Ubud Bali

                           Telephone ++62-(0)361 970095
                                                 [email

Related Website

[John Fawcett Foundation

[Bridges Bali



Baywatch Comes to Tanjung Benoa
Bali to Establish Lifeguard Station on Beach at Tanjung Benoa

The beachfront at Tanjung Benoa, adjacent to Nusa Dua in South Bali, will soon have its own Bali Lifeguard Station (Balwista) funded by Rp. 221 million (US$24,500) from the provincial budget for 2011.

The head if the tourist office for Badung, Cokorda Raka Darmawan, told NusaBali that the new lifeguard station would become fully operational in 2012.

A total of 8-10 members of Bali’s professional lifeguard corps will be assigned to work the new post working over two daily shifts every day.

Cokorda promised that the lifeguards assigned to Tanjung Benoa would receive special training and special equipment in order to deal with the specific conditions at Tanjung Benoa and the heavy concentration of water sports activities operating from that beach.

NusaBali reports that the regional government of Badung has already held coordinating meetings with a local community organizations (LPM) and the Association of Water Sports Operators (Gahawisri) at Tanjung Benoa to ensure a smooth introduction of the new lifesaving post.


How You Can Help Save the Balinese Language
Important Initiative Underway to Create Balinese Language Course Materials and Encourage the Use of Balinese.

We are living in an era of extinction. While the loss of animal species and natural habitats disappears at an increasingly alarming rate, traditional cultures and languages are also under threat.

of globalization, experts predict that as many as 3,000 or 50% of the world's 6,000-7,000 languages are poised to be lost.

And, while the endemic language of the Balinese – Basa Bali - is not extinct, it is on the endangered list of languages. (See: Tiang Sing Bisa Mebasa Bali!)  

According to the National Science Foundation, the loss of a local language results also in the loss of a unique intellectual tradition, local tradition and culture, and our ability to understand the progression of human history.

The number of texts dedicated to the understanding and study of Basa Bali is limited. In order to help address this lack of material and encourage the study of Balinese, [www.basabali.org] has been formed backed by a U.S. registered 501(c)(3) organization not-for-profit organization to which donations are tax deductable.

There are only a few volumes dealng with the teaching of Balinese. This project will help develop these materials in cooperation with Balinese and Western experts in order to encourage and maintain the use of Balinese.

The resulting Balinese language materials from the project will be based on a series of videos depicting dialogues from everyday life in Bali. The dialogues and accompanying exercises will be carefully created to teach grammar, pronunciation, and appropriate word choice dictated by the social status of both the speaker and the listener. Multiple pop-up notes will also help users understand the cultural context of the dialogues.

The program, when completed, will be available as a stand alone DVD or via the Internet. The organizers plan to make the material available free of charge to nonprofit organizations and schools in Bali and at a modest fee to all others in order to cover the expense of updates, maintenance and technical support.

Basabali.org aims to bring together Balinese and Western linguists, anthropologists, videographers, animators, historians, and language software specialists together in this crusade to encourage to study and use of Balinese.

The project has establish a Kickstart.com initiative in order to accumulate the US$8,500 needed to launch this project [Learn More] .

The amount sought to undertake this effort is very modest, made possible through the donation of the language software that will be used for lessons and the generous contributions of time by linguistic and language-teaching experts. The money donated  will be used to cover the production of the videos and dialogues, including paying for local transportation and expenses, equipment, cameramen, dialogue and video editors, sound studio use and compensating actors.

An initial 10-12 video are targeted for production. [Click Here] to make even the most modest contribution to help [Basabali.org]  commence its essential work.


Pay as You Go
US$25.6 Million in Visa-on-Arrival Fees Collected in Bali During First Six Months of 2011.

Visa-on-arrival revenues accumulated via the US$25 fee paid by most tourists to Bali for a 30-day visa totaled US$4.7 million in June 2011.

On a cumulative basis, January – June 2011 a total of US$25.6 million was collected by Bali immigration officers, according to data reported by the Bali branch of Bank Indonesia.


Death Row at Bali’s Kerobokan Prison
One Prisoner Dies After Deadly Braw at Bali’s Kerobokan Prison

Bali’s chronically over-crowded Kerobokan prison, scene of a prison riot in June 2011, saw a new outbreak of violence result in the death of an inmate on Wednesday, October 5, 2011.

The prison facility was built for 323 inmates but is now filled to overflowing with 1,056 inmates, with large groups of prisoners occupying cells designed to house only one or two people.

In the latest incident, 27-year-old Muhamad Arif Hamzah, serving a sentence for a narcotics violation, died after being viciously attacked by fellow inmate Galih Irfan Abdilah (24).

Prison authorities report that the two men became involved in an altercation over a debt of Rp. 500,000 (US$55) owed by Hamzah to Abdilah on the afternoon of Tuesday, October 4, 2011 that saw Hamzah sent to the hospital with severe head injuries from which he died the following morning.

Police continue to investigate the apparent homicide.

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Obama: First Among Equals in Bali
No Extraordinary Security Treatment Planned for Obama Visit to Bali for the ASEAN Summit Beyond that Extended to Other World Leaders Expected in Bali.

Jakarta Post reports that the Indonesian military command coordinating security for 18 heads of state expected in Bali for the ASEAN Summit November 14-19, 2011, says President Obama’s security measures will be in accordance with the strict protocols in place to keep all the visiting leaders safe.

Major General Leonard Louk, Commander of the 9th Udayana Military Command, said: “President Obama has confirmed his attendance at the summit. Our military personnel have also discussed with security officers of all visiting heads of state to ensure the preparations’.”

He emphasized that Obama’s security measures would be equal to those provided to other visiting leaders.

“We have held a meeting with the United States’ officer and they said they would follow our security protocol since they will be entering our territory,” Major General Leonard Louk added.

Bali will, however, have a massive security operation in place during the prestigious conference. Sizeable contingents from the Indonesian Army, Navy and Air Force will be deployed to assist the police in maintaining security.

Bulletproof cars will be provided to key delegates and warships will be patrolling the waters around Bali. Air Force F-16 jets will also be deployed over the skies of Bali to provide an additional umbrella of security over the island.

Wary of the potential national embarrassment of any incidents threatening the security of the ASEAN Summit, security officer are determined to maintain the peace and avoid a repeat of the Bangkok Summit that was cancelled due to civil unrest.


A Peaceful World Rejoices
I Nyoman Darsene and Tina Bailey Joint Painting Exhibition October 14 – 22 at Gateway Community Center, Sanur, Bali.

I Nyoman Darsene, a native Balinese artists, and Dr. Tina Bailey, a long-time resident of the island, will conduct a two-person painting exhibition at the Gateway Community Center on Jalan Danau Batur #3 in Sanur, Bali.

dquo;Bumi Bersukacita Dalam Damai Sejahtera: A Peaceful World Rejoices” will display works of these two artists contemplating a peaceful planet and will be open daily at the Center (Near the Bali International School) from October 14-21, 2011.

For more information telephone ++62-(0)81338721067


Bali Tourist Numbers Continue to Soar
Bali by the Numbers: August Arrivals Up 6.25% as Bali Moves Towards Record 2.75 million Arrivals for 2011.

Total foreign arrivals to Bali in August 2011 hit 250,835 – a total that is 6.25% better than August 2010 (236,080). On a cumulative basis January through August, Bali is tracking 10.29% ahead of the same period last year with 1,800,346 foreign visitors.

Now eight months into the year, should Bali maintains its current year-to-date rate of growth at 10.29% through the end of 2011, the island will end the year with a record 2.75 million foreign visitors.

Bali By Major Markets

Australia
  • August arrivals increased month-on-month by 17.87% with 68,855 visitors.
  • Year to date Australian arrivals total 503,617 – an increase of 25.43% over the first eight months of 2010. 
  • Since 2008 arrivals from Australia to Bali have increased 159%. In 2008, Australia ranked in second place as a source of foreign visitors to Bali, but now holds undisputed top place as a source of visitors.

Japan
  • Japan’s decline continues unabated. August 2011 arrivals totaled 18,055 – down 33.29% from the same month in 2010.
  • Year to date, Japanese arrivals have declined 27.27% at 123,733 visitors.
  • For many years, Japan held top rank as a source of Bali visitors. Financial upheaval and natural disaster has now shifted Japan to third place behind Australia and the PRC.
  • Year on year for January – August Japanese arrivals are down 27.27%.
  • Compared to arrivals from Japan generated in 2008, the Japanese market has shrunk 49.7%

People’s Republic of China (PRC)
  • PRC arrivals totaled 26,299 in August, improving 22.34% over August 2010.
  • Year-to-date PRC arrivals have increased 13.05% totaling 158,031 for January-August 2011. 
  • The PRC has now moved into the #2 post as a source for Bali arrivals.
  • Since 2008, PRC arrivals have surged ahead by 87.07%.

Taiwan
  • Taiwanese arrivals for August were largely static as compared with the same month one year ago. 10,366 Taiwanese visited Bali in August as compared to 10,389 in August last year.
  • The same stagnancy is also evident on a year-on-year basis. Taiwanese arrivals January – August totaled 89,532 – a figure that is only 0.22% ahead of the same period in 2010.
  • Taiwan has slid to fifth place from it former #3 ranking in the race for foreign arrivals to Bali and likely to slide further still as arrival number from that country continue to be fairly flat. Since 2008, Taiwanese arrivals have decreased 5.23%.

Malaysia
  • Malaysian arrivals month-on-month are up 22.07% with 12,250 Malaysians coming to Bali in August 2011.
  • Year-to-date Malaysian arrivals total 108,154 – an increase of 17.44% 
  •  Malaysian arrivals now rank number 4 among Bali visitors. Since 2008, Malaysian arrivals are up 34.89%.

South Korea
  • South Korean arrivals are lagging. August arrivals declined 9.4% for the month (11,167) when compared to August one year before.
  • Showing a similar lackluster pattern, South Korean arrivals are down 1.43% year to date through the end of August as compared to the same period in 2010.
  • The importance of Malaysian arrivals has increased from #6 to #4, while declining a modest 6.91% since 2008 while during the same period other markets have surged ahead in terms of their arrivals to Bali.

United Kingdom
  • U.K. arrivals to Bali are performing modestly. August arrivals from the U.K. hit 11,279 – an increase of only 3.77% over the totals for August 2010.
  • Year-on-year arrivals from the U.K. to Bali stand at 72,172 through the end of August. This is almost static and just 0.52% ahead of the same eight months in 2010.
  • The U.K. now stands as the number #8 source of business for Bali. Since 2008, U.K. arrivals have increased 34.64%

France
  • French arrivals improved 6.03% in August 2011 at 17,266 visitors.
  • Year-on-year French arrivals are up 4.42% with 78,108 arrivals January – August 2011.
  • Since 2008, French arrivals to Bali have increased 67.2%. French arrivals now represent the 7th largest source of foreign visitors for Bali.

Russia
  • Russian arrivals surged in August, improving month-on-month by 19.16% with 4,297 visitors from Russia.
  • Year-on-year Russian arrivals are up 15.91% at 47,200.
  • Russians, who now represent the 12th largest market to Bali, haveincreased 19.89% since 2008.

The Netherlands
  • A traditional powerhouse for Bali arrivals, the Netherlands is in sharp decline. August arrivals totaled 4,297 – declining 27.11% from the number of Dutch who visited in August 2010.
  • Year-on-year Dutch arrivals are also down 10.86% with 47,276 Dutch visitors landing in Bali during January-August 2011.
  • The Dutch market is the 11th largest source of foreign visitors to Bali. Since 2008, the Dutch market has declined 16.73%.

U.S.A.
  • U.S. citizens are coming to Bali in record numbers. August arrivals recorded 6,570 U.S. visitors – an increase of 22.73% over arrivals in August 2010.
  • Year-on-year U.S.A. arrivals are up 20.45% with 57,005 visitors through the end of August.
  • U.S. visitors now rank as the 9th largest market of foreign visitors to Bali. Since 2008, this market has increased by 21.49%.

Germany
  • The German market is largely stagnant to Bali. August 2011 arrivals with 10,424 visitors is down 2.71% when compared to August 2010.
  • Year-on-year German arrivals are down 0.59% with 53,726 visitors January – August 2011.
  • Since 2008, Germany has slipped from 8th to the 10th position in terms of foreign visitors to Bali. In the same period, the size of the German market has increased by only 6.02%.


The Cornerstone of Self-Indulgence
Laguna Bali Resort and Spa Lunches New Shopping and Dining Experience for Bali Visitors at 'Cornerstone, Deli, Vinothek and More'

The Laguna, a Luxury Collection Resort & Spa in Bali has launched a new concept in shopping for “those little extras” to complement a holiday in paradise.

With a “catch-all” branding as “Cornerstone, Deli, Vinothek and More” the retail outlets is positioned to ensures resort guests can obtain everything they desire in a singular shopping, dining, and leisure experience - ranging from international epicurean delights and wine, to local souvenirs and even an Internet hub.

Cornerstone showcases a glassed-in wine cellar with a wide selection of premier wines dominated by a six-person dining area perfect for hosting memorable meals and wine-tastings

In keeping with the resort's modern Balinese style, Cornerstone has dark wood accents and smooth white tiles framing a tempting deli with both indoor and al fresco seating options. The deli boast a myriad of gourmet offerings with extensive display of cakes, chocolates, a variety of homemade ice creams, take-away sandwiches, sushi and sashimi – all available to be enjoyed on site or on a take-away basis or in the comfort of your room.

Proving popular with visitors to the Cornerstone is the Sambal Corner - a tribute to the quintessential condiment for Indonesian food. The corner displays five traditional grinding mortars where guests can taste smaple the sambals with Indonesian crackers before selecting their preferred style of preparation available in bottled form for purchase.

An adjacent boutique offers jewelry, clothing, local collectibles, drug store items and a money exchange counter. A billiards table and spacious Internet station with five hubs, accessible even outside opening hours, are also available.

[The Laguna, a Luxury Collection Resort & Spa]  


The Compensations of Air Travel
Indonesian Air Travelers Entitled to Range of Compensations from Air Carriers Starting from Mid-November 2011.

By mid-November 2011, the Indonesian government will implement a new law to protect the interest of the consumer flying in Indonesia.

Under the terms of the Ministry of Transportation Law No. 77 of 2011:
  • When a plane is more than four hours late  each passenger must be paid Rp. 300,000 (US$33.50) in cash compensation.
  • Passengers are entitled to a 50% discount from the ticket price paid when an airline offers an alternate destination close to, but not the same as, their original intended destination.
  • Passengers diverted to alternate flight due to an airline delay cannot be asked to pay any additional charges this change incurs.
  • Lost baggage must be compensated at Rp. 200,000 (US$22.25) per kilogram to a maximum amount of Rp. 4 million (US$444)
  • Lost cargo must be compensated at a rate of Rp. 100,000 (US$11) per kilogram and cargo that has been damaged while in the airline’s hands must be compensated at Rp. 50,000 (US$5.55) per kilogram.
  • When an alternate flight is not offered and passengers are compelled to wait for the next flight, the airline must provide food and beverage refreshment, accommodation and ground transportation.
  • If a flight is cancelled, the airline is required to refund 100% of the original fare paid.
  • When passengers loses their lives while flying commercially in Indonesia, compensation in the amount of Rp. 1.25 billion (US$139,000) must be paid by the airline. An elaborated schedule of compensation is also in place for various levels of injury suffered by the flying public is in place.
Airlines are exempted from compensating passengers when flights are cancelled or delayed because of weather conditions or for technical problems outside the airline's control. Technical problems beyond the airline’s control would include the closure of an airport, airport disruption and delays caused by long lines of airplanes waiting for landing or take-off permission.


Tour d’ Indonesia
10-Stage Jakarta to Bali Telkom Speedy Tour d’Indonesia 2011 Final Two Stages in Bali October 11-12, 2011

The 4th Telkom Speedy Tour d’indonesia 2011 features participation by world-class cyclist on the 10-stage 1,316 kilometer Jakarta to Bali race October 2-12, 2011.

A part of the formal race calendar of Union Cycliste Internationale, the 2011 Java to Bali event is the biggest race in Indonesia with 9 international teams and 10 Indonesian teams participating.

The race will end on Wednesday, October 12, 2011, at the Renon area Bali’s capital city of Denpasar.

The international slate of cyclists are vying for right to hold the “President’s Cup” over the coming year. Also at stake are trophies from the Head of the Indonesia Police, the National Sports Committee (KONI) and the Minister of Sports (MENPORA).

Cash prizes of US$125,000 will be divided between to team and individual riders turning in the best times on individual stages of the race and best overall times.

Last Two Stages in Bali

The final two stages of the race - stages 9 and 10 – will take place in Bali on Tuesday and Wednesday, October 11-12, 2011.

Stage 9 (Gliimanuk – Kintamani)

Tuesday – October 11, 2011. A race from the Gilimanuk ferry port to Kintamani covering 137.7 kilometers will start at 10:00 a.m. from in front of the Gilimanuk police station and finish at Penelokan in Kintamani.
Stage 10 (Kintamani – Denpasar)

Stage 10 (Kintamani - Denpasar)

Wednesday – October 12, 2011 . A race from Kintamani to downtown Denpasar over a distance of 97 kilometers. The race starts at 10:00 a.m. at Penelokan, Kintamani ending at Renon Square in Denpasar.
Those wishing to see the dramatic end of the race should be on hand in Renon starting from around 12:15 p.m..

[Tour d’Indonesia Website]  

 


2 ‘Suspect’ Bird Flu Cases in Bali
Initial Tests ‘Positive’ for H5N1 for Two Children from Bangli, Northeast Bali.

Bali health officials are concerned that the H5N1 or Avian Bird Flu may have made a foothold among the human residents of Bali.

After a period of nearly two years in which no “suspect” cases have been reported, two siblings  from Bangli in northeast Bali, aged 10 and 5, are now hospitalized in the isolation unit of Bali Sanglah General Hospital.

The two children - a boy and a girl - were transferred from the Bangli Public Hospital to Denpasar on Friday, October 7, 2011, Suffering from symptom initially thought to be pneumonia or a lung infection, medical personnel grew concerned that when it was confirmed that the two young patients had symptom consistent with H5N1 and recent contact with a group of chickens that had died unexpectedly.

The Director of Medical Services and Nursing at the Sanglah General Hospital , Dr. A.A.N. Jayakusuma, told the press on Saturday, October 8, 2011, that the bird flu containment team have taken the necessary medical steps. “We have quickly undertaken supporting examinations and laboratory tests to confirm that whether or not the patients are victims of H5N1 which is the virus that causes Avian Flu. From the examinations carried out by the laboratory of Sanglah Hospitlal we have encountered positive confirmation,” explained Dr. Jayakusuma, as quoted by Bali Post.

Despite tests confirming H5N1 performed in Bali, the diagnosis will only be final when three different laboratories also confirm the results. Tests being conducted at Udayana University in Denpasar have now rendered a "positive" result for H1N. Jakarta lab results are expected on Monday.

The two children are being treated in isolation units at the hospital. All family members who have had contact with the children as well as the medical staff treating them are being given preventative dosages of Tamiflu.

The two children are receiving intensive medical treatment, including assisted breathing with respirators.


 
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August 17, 2009

Bali Update #674
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Bali Update #673
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Bali Update #672
July 27, 2009

Bali Update #671
July 20, 2009

Bali Update #670
July 13, 2009

Bali Update #669
July 06, 2009

Bali Update #668
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Bali Update #667
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Bali Update #666
June 15, 2009

Bali Update #665
June 08, 2009

Bali Update #664
June 01, 2009

Bali Update #663
May 25, 2009

Bali Update #662
May 18, 2009

Bali Update #661
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Bali Update #660
May 04, 2009

Bali Update #659
April 27, 2009

Bali Update #658
April 18, 2009

Bali Update #657
April 11, 2009

Bali Update #656
April 04, 2009

Bali Update #655
March 28, 2009

Bali Update #654
March 21, 2009

Bali Update #653
March 14, 2009

Bali Update #652
March 07, 2009

Bali Update #651
February 28, 2009

Bali Update #650
February 21, 2009

Bali Update #649
February 14, 2009

Bali Update #648
February 7, 2009

Bali Update #647
January 31, 2009

Bali Update #646
January 26, 2009

Bali Update #645
January 19, 2009

Bali Update #644
January 10, 2009

Bali Update #643
January 05, 2009

Bali Update #642
December 29, 2008

Bali Update #641
December 22, 2008

Bali Update #640
December 15, 2008

Bali Update #639
December 08, 2008

Bali Update #639
December 08, 2008

Bali Update #638
December 01, 2008

Bali Update #637
November 24, 2008

Bali Update #636
November 17, 2008

Bali Update #635
November 10, 2008

Bali Update #634
November 03, 2008

Bali Update #633
October 27, 2008

Bali Update #632
October 20, 2008

Bali Update #631
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Bali Update #630
October 06, 2008

Bali Update #629
Septembe 29, 2008

Bali Update #628
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Bali Update #627
September 15, 2008

Bali Update #626
September 08, 2008

Bali Update #625
September 01, 2008

Bali Update #624
August 25, 2008

Bali Update #623
August 18, 2008

Bali Update #622
August 11, 2008

Bali Update #621
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Bali Update #620
July 28, 2008

Bali Update #619
July 21, 2008

Bali Update #618
July 14, 2008

Bali Update #617
July 07, 2008

Bali Update #616
June 30, 2008

Bali Update #615
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Bali Update #614
June 16, 2008

Bali Update #613
June 09, 2008

Bali Update #612
June 02, 2008

Bali Update #611
May 26, 2008

Bali Update #610
May 19, 2008

Bali Update #609
May 12, 2008

Bali Update #608
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Bali Update #607
April 28, 2008

Bali Update #606
April 21, 2008

Bali Update #605
April 14, 2008

Bali Update #604
April 07, 2008

Bali Update #603
March 31, 2008

Bali Update #602
March 10, 2008

Bali Update #601
March 10, 2008

Bali Update #600
March 10, 2008

Bali Update #599
March 03, 2008

Bali Update #598
February 25, 2008

Bali Update #597
February 18, 2008

Bali Update #596
February 11, 2008

Bali Update #595
February 04, 2008

Bali Update #594
January 28, 2008

Bali Update #593
January 21, 2008

Bali Update #592
January 14, 2008

Bali Update #591
January 07, 2008

Bali Update #590
December 31, 2007

Bali Update #589
December 24, 2007

Bali Update #588
December 17, 2007

Bali Update #587
December 10, 2007

Bali Update #586
December 03, 2007

Bali Update #585
November 26, 2007

Bali Update #584
November 19, 2007

Bali Update #583
November 12, 2007

Bali Update #582
November 05, 2007

Bali Update #581
October 29, 2007

Bali Update #580
October 22, 2007

Bali Update #579
October 15, 2007

Bali Update #578
October 08, 2007

Bali Update #577
October 01, 2007

Bali Update #576
September 24, 2007

Bali Update #575
September 17, 2007

Bali Update #574
September 10, 2007

Bali Update #573
September 03, 2007

Bali Update #572
August 27, 2007

Bali Update #571
August 20, 2007

Bali Update #570
August 13, 2007

Bali Update #569
August 06, 2007

Bali Update #568
July 30, 2007

Bali Update #567
July 23, 2007

Bali Update #566
July 16, 2007

Bali Update #565
July 09, 2007

Bali Update #564
July 02, 2007

Bali Update #563
June 25, 2007

Bali Update #562
June 18, 2007

Bali Update #561
June 11, 2007

Bali Update #560
June 04, 2007

Bali Update #559
May 28, 2007

Bali Update #558
May 21, 2007

Bali Update #557
May 14, 2007

Bali Update #556
May 07, 2007

Bali Update #555
April 30, 2007

Bali Update #554
April 23, 2007

Bali Update #553
April 16, 2007

Bali Update #552
April 09, 2007

Bali Update #551
April 02, 2007

Bali Update #550
March 26, 2007

Bali Update #549
March 19, 2007

Bali Update #548
March 12, 2007

Bali Update #547
March 05, 2007

Bali Update #546
February 26, 2007

Bali Update #545
February 19, 2007

Bali Update #544
February 12, 2007

Bali Update #543
February 05, 2007

Bali Update #542
January 29, 2007

Bali Update #541
January 22, 2007

Bali Update #540
January 15, 2007

Bali Update #539
January 08, 2007

Bali Update #538
January 01, 2007

Bali Update #537
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Bali Update #536
December 18, 2006

Bali Update #535
December 11, 2006

Bali Update #534
December 04, 2006

Bali Update #533
November 27, 2006

Bali Update #532
November 20, 2006

Bali Update #531
November 13, 2006

Bali Update #530
November 06, 2006

Bali Update #529
October 30, 2006

Bali Update #528
October 23, 2006

Bali Update #527
October 16, 2006

Bali Update #526
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Bali Update #525
October 2, 2006

Bali Update #524
September 04, 2006

Bali Update #523
September 04, 2006

Bali Update #522
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Bali Update #521
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Bali Update #520
August 28, 2006

Bali Update #519
August 21, 2006

Bali Update #518
August 14, 2006

Bali Update #517
August 07, 2006

Bali Update #516
July 31, 2006

Bali Update #515
July 24, 2006

Bali Update #514
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Bali Update #513
July 10, 2006

Bali Update #512
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Bali Update #511
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Bali Update #510
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Bali Update #509
June 12, 2006

Bali Update #508
June 05, 2006

Bali Update #507
May 29, 2006

Bali Update #506
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Bali Update #505
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Bali Update #504
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Bali Update #503
May 01, 2006

Bali Update #502
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Bali Update #501
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