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Komplek Pertokoan
Sanur Raya No. 27
Jl. By Pass Ngurah Rai,
Sanur, Bali, Indonesia

Tel:
++62 361 286 283

Fax:
++62 361 286 284

U.S.A. Fax:(toll free)
1-800-506-8633

U.K. Fax:
++44-20-7000-1235

Australian Fax:
++61-2-94750419

24h:
++62 812 3819724

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Bali News by Bali Update
BALI UPDATE #941 - 15 September 2014

IN THIS UPDATE


‘Danke Schön’ But Not ‘Auf Wiedersehen’
Bali Honors its Retiring Honorary German Consul Reinhold Jantzen

Long-time Bali residents and members of the island's diplomatic corps joined the Ambassador of the Federal Republic of Germany in Indonesia, Norbert Baas, in paying homage the retiring Honorary Consul for Germany Bali at a dinner and cocktail reception held at Laguna – the Luxury Collection on Friday, December 9, 2011.

The retiring Honorary Consul for Germany, Reinhold Jantzen, has served in that capacity since April 1986. In more than 25 years as “Berlin’s Man” in Bali," Jantzen was twice bestowed with high honors by his government for meritorious service; welcomed German heads of state on official visits to Bali; and served as the point man for German nationals in need of assistance while living or visiting Bali.

His tasks routinely included helping travelers who lost their passports; visiting Germans incarcerated in jail or hospitalized in Bali; and helping people process the documentation of marriage, births and deaths involving a German national. In his darkest days as Consul, Jantzen was also compelled to deal with tragedy and death on a massive scale in the aftermath of the Bali bombings of 2002 and 2005.

Reinhold Jantzen first came to Bali 35 years ago, originally working in German development projects. Starting his own food service business in 1986, he now supplies quality processed meat products to the islands hotels and supermarkets. Married to Endang Suciati, Jantzen is the proud father of two sons and a daughter.

Ambassador Baas spoke at the evening’s gathering, saluting the long and valuable service provided by Reinhold Jantzen to the Republics of Germany and Indonesia. Now 72 years of age, Baas explained how German regulations require the retirement of the honorary consul in Bali, despite Reinhold’s demonstrable reserves of energy and expertise.

The evening was also used to appoint and take the oath of office for Germany’s new Honorary Consul in Bali. That role is now filled by Robert Jantzen, the eldest son of the retiring honorary consul and a partner in Mama’ Delicatessen. Reinhold Jantzen, who held the informal title of “Dean” as Bali’s longest-serving consular officer, has now turned over his role to his Son who becomes the island’s youngest diplomatic consul.

Shown on balidiscovery.com are (left to right), Reinhold Jantzen, retiring Honorary Consul for German in Bali; Robert Jantzen, Honorary Consul for Germany in Bali; and H.E. Mr. Norbert Baas, Ambassador for the Federal Republic of Germany in Indonesia.

Related Article

[Cross of Merit for Reinhold Jantzen]

 


The Seeds of Success
Governor Working to Upgrade the Status and Prestige Farmers in Bali

Governor Made Mangku Pastika says the diminishing desire to work in agriculture in Bali stems from the view that farming is the work of low-caste individuals.

Quoted in Beritabali.com, Pastika said: “In terms of social psychology, being a farmer is considered lacking in prestige; work done by the lowest members of society – the Sudra caste, the lowest of the low. At this time there are no children of farmers who aspire to become farmers. Those who graduate from the agricultural faculty don’t wish to become farmers, but want to become the head of the local agricultural service. The farmers in Bali are now old people.”

The governors’ comments were made on December 4, 2011.

To overcome the diminishing prestige of a career in farming, the governor has introduced the Simantri program – an integrated program to make technological innovation in agriculture available to Bali’s farmers to even those living in remote villages.

“This program allows us to give farmers appropriate farming technology that will maximize productivity and enhance quality. In this way, the prestige of working as a farmer will be lifted – the Sudra caste will elevated,” explained Pastika.

In addition to introducing integrated farming methods to Bali’s agricultural caste, Pastika said a change of mindset is also needed among the island’s younger generation.

“The mindset must be changed. There must be added value given to farmers such as subsidies, training, partnering and alike. Agriculture in Bali must thrive; there must be Balinese who become farmers because agriculture is the basis of Bali’s culture. Bali tourism is cultural tourism – a culture that lives and breathes a Hinduism that is agrarian. The farmers continue to exist, for this reason we need to persuade the younger generation to become farmers.”

Related Articles

[Madé, Madé, Pak Petani, How Does Your Garden Grow?]

[Bali’s Roots Grow on its Rice Terraces]
 
[Losing Paradise in Bali]

[Bali Agriculture at the Crossroads
 


Taming the Lion
Disabled Airline Passenger Wins Discrimination Suit Against Lion Air

The National Human Rights Commission (Komnas HAM) has expressed it highest appreciation to the Central Jakarta Court's decision to rule against the Indonesian air carrier Lion Air,  PT Angkasa Pura -the government-owned airport management company, and the Ministry of Transportation in a case brought against the three for discrimination against disabled travelers .

As reported by detiknews.com, the commissioner of Komnas Ham, Saharuddin Daming, said on Thursday, December 8, 2011: “ The decision is spectacular. We give our highest appreciation to the panel of judges who ruled in this case.”

According to Daming, the court’s ruling demonstrates that the law in Indonesia is prepared to accommodate respect for human rights, in particular the rights of the disabled. He said the decision was all the more remarkable as it was made in the mist of a general decline in respect for human rights and a lack of law enforcement in protecting civil liberties.

“This decision has become a precedence for the law and has taught the public not to ignore the handicapped and disabled,” proclaimed Daming.

He also expressed his appreciation for the judges who punished the Ministry of Transportation for failing to control and supervise the country's airline industry in the area of handicapped rights as required under Section 134, paragraph 3 of Air Transportation Law Number 1 of 2009.

Daming told the press that Lion Air has the right to appeal the courts decision. Adding: “To file an appeal is their right. However, this will reflect they do not respect human rights.”

Lion Air was ordered in the case by the court to pay Rp. 25 million (US$2,780) and costs as well as publish an apology in a national newspaper. The panel of judges ruled Lion Air committed discrimination against passenger Ridwan Sumantri on April 22, 2011, causing the disabled man both material non-material losses.

Upon hearing the court’s ruling, the legal counsel for Lion Air, Nusirwin, immediately declared his client’s intention to appeal the decision. Nusiwin said the decision of the judges exceeded the amount sought by the plaintiff in the case, creating a decision that he sees as divorced from the facts presented before the court. He claimed Sumantri had failed to demonstrate to the court the losses he sustained in the alleged incident.

The Incident

The suit reportedly originated when Sumantri, an activist for disabled rights, who is himself wheelchair-bound, was compelled by Lion Air to sign a release before being allowed to fly. That exemption absolved the airline of any responsibility in connection with his flight and affirmed Sumantri's responsibility to other passengers should his condition pose a threat to fellow travelers.

Samantri objected to the ultimatum issued by the airline when he was a passenger on April 11, 2011, insisting such steps were completely unnecessary in that his condition was not contagious. Filing suit against the airline for discrimination, he also sought damages form PT Angkasa Pura who he argued provided poor service on the ground at the airport for disabled passengers. Also named in his suit was the Ministry of Transportation who he asserted failed to monitor and supervise the airline’s treatment of the disabled.

Ridwan Sunatri was flying from Jakarta to Denpasar (Bali) on Lion Air flight JT12 departing at 13:05 on April 21, 2011. The Airlines staff refused to fly the disabled man unless he agreed to sign the elaborate releases prepared by the carrier.



Bali’s Clogged Arteries
Bali Government Raises Official Pollution Level on Ayung and Pakerisan Rivers.

The water quality in the rivers of the Gianyar region of Bali has deteriorated markedly in 2011, reports The Bali Post.

High pollution levels in the Ayung and Pakerisan Rivers pose a threat to the numerous rafting operators and tourism business situated along their banks.

Bali Post reported on December 8, 2011, that the drop in water quality is based on surveys conducted by the provincial government, including the headways and crossing points in the various regencies of Bangli, Gianyar, Badung and Denpasar – and including the final product as it empties into the ocean.

Particularly bad news for water sports operators were results that saw the water quality of the Ayung River has been officially downgraded from “Class II” -  suitable for water-sports to “Class III” -  suitable for agriculture. Officials postulate the higher levels of pollution now being recorded are due to a number of causes, including erosion, agriculture, tourism, trash disposal and pesticides.

Results for the Pakerisan River also reveal a similar level of pollution from its headwaters to the seas. Earning a “Class III” classification, the Pakerisan river has traditionally been a favored source of drinking water because of more than 15 different tributaries – including the historically sacred water sources that flow through Tirta Empul and Tirta Dukun.

The Pakerisan River passes through areas traced back to the earliest settlement of Bali, flowing through a treasure-trove of ancient historical and cultural sites.

Research Continues

Separately, the chief of the Gianyar Environmental Agency section for the Supervision and Pollution Eradication Department, IB Sukarya, does not deny the polluted condition of the two major river ways. In fact, his office is currently looking into the Wos, Petanu and Sungasng Rivers to ascertain their current state of pollution.

The Environmental Agency cites changing land use practice, the poor use of land, declining open spaces  available for the absorption of rainfall, erosion, uncontrolled trash disposal and a lack of law enforcement as among the major causes for Bali’s blighted rivers.

The Ginayat Environmental Agency is involved in ongoing efforts to educate local communities on how to reduce and eliminate pollution. They have also recently assisted in the planting of 100 hectares of bamboo forests in the headwater areas of the Pakerisan River.


BII MayBank Bali Marathon
“Push Your Limit” Adopted as Theme of International Marathon to be Held in Bali on April 22, 2012

PT Bank International Indonesia (BII) today announced plans to host the BII Maybank Bali Marathon. The event will be held on Sunday, April 22, 2012 – the first international scale full marathon held in Indonesia in over 20 years.

The full marathon will cover a distance of 42.195 kilometers and can be run by individual athletes or teams running in relay. The Bali race will also feature a half-marathon” of 21.0975 kilometers and a shorter 10-kilometer run.
the theme of “Push Your Limit” the BII Maybank Bali Marathon aims to encourage participants and the general public to develop a fighting spirit and always make a maximal effort in working towards personal goals. The BII Maybank Bali Marathon also marks a growing public awareness of the importance of living a healthy lifestyle through participation in a regular program of sporting activities. By “pushing the limit” the organizers hope to inspire people to achieve and excel personal targets while thinking positively and moving on to even greater achievements in the future.

“We are hosting the Bii Maybank Bali Marathon with the theme ‘Push Your Limit’ to inspire the public spirit to struggle; to never give up until an assignment is completed and all goals are achieved. This spirit is in keeping with the marathon tradition where every runner is faced with challenges in covering a long distance,” explained Rahardja Alimhamzah, Acting President Director Bank International Indonesia.

Rahardja continued, “BII Maybank Bali Marathon operates in tandem with the community-based programs of BII, a main pillar of which is pursuing a healthy lifestyle through, among other things, participation in sports.”

BII Maybank chose Bali as the best location within Indonesia for the revival of a full-marathon race in Indonesia. In addition to being an international tourism destination with spectacular scenery, the island also manages to attract more than 2.7 million foreign tourists and at least an equal number of domestic tourist visitors each year. BII Maybank also plans to create a unique sporting event that will combine athleticism with elements of Bali’s rich culture. Finally, Bali also offers a supporting infrastructure as a regional and international transportation hub with an outstanding array of accommodation options. The Bali Marathon aims to become an important component in efforts to promote Indonesian tourism to the world.

BII Maybank Bali Marathon will be professionally managed and supported by a team of experienced runners determined to develop running as a part of a healthy lifestyle. Among the team of athletic advisors are Barbara Oravetz, Mark Clay and Finna Huang. Bali Discovery Tours, an island-based event organizer with a long track record in international sporting events, will operate the Marathon.

Every participant in the BII Maybank Bali Marathon will be provided with a timing chip that will record personal running times. A technologically advanced on-line registration system will be used to help athletes both from within Indonesia and abroad complete the registration process and stay updated on race developments as race day approaches.

BII also has plans to actively include the members of Balinese society living along the race route to guarantee the successful conduct of race. This is in keeping with the commitment of BII to promote and support education, healthful living and the promotion of community values. The program of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) carried out by BII will reflect the theme “Push Your Limit” promoted by the Bali Marathon, through a system in which pledges of charitable donations can be made in the name of individual participants who successfully complete their race.

To obtain complete information on the race and related programs BII Maybank Bali Marathon is launching the website [www.balimarathon.com]  together with related sites on social media such as Facebook and Twitter.

“We are delighted to be working together with a profession team supporting the Bank in organizing this event that is enthusiastically welcomed by the people of Bali. We thank all those working together with us in support of the BII Maybank Bali Marathon,” added Rahardja at the press conference held in Jakarta to announce the event.


Indonesian Tourism Hoping to Sidestep Global Crisis
Tourism Minister Pangestu Says Promotional Spending and Focused Approach on Selected Source Countries Will Help Indonesia Avert Tourism Downturn Due to European Economic Crisis.

The Ministry for Tourism and the Creative Economy is optimistic that in the face of global economic uncertainty, Indonesia will achieve 8 million foreign visitors using a promotional budget of Rp. 1.99 trillion (US$211 million).

Bisnis.com reports that Minister for Tourism and the Creative Economy, Mari Elka Pangestu, said next year’s target represents an increase of 3.89% over 2011 targets. “We are still optimistic the tourism target can be achieved despite the world economic crisis affecting a number of large nations,” said Pangestu, while attending meetings in Nusa Dua.

To hit its targeted visitor numbers, the government has budgeted Rp.1.9 trillion (US$211 million) to kick-start the tourism and creative economies. Pangestu feels strongly that the creative sector is posed for high growth through at least the year 2025.

“This budget is focused on all regions of Indonesia,” said Pangestu. In uncertain economic time, the Ministry and its offices across Indonesia, particularly those elements in Bali and Nusa Tenggara, act as main corridors of tourism that will pursue arrivals from China, India, Russia and Australia.

“Maybe these countries will not be overly affected by the crisis,” she added.

At this time the government is also pursuing the creation of an ASEAN-wide visa system that many predict will help arrival numbers grow across all ASEAN destination participating in the program.

Bali will end 2011 with more than 2.7 million foreign visitors as part of the 7.7 million foreign tourists expected nation-wide.

Related Article

[Bali by the Numbers: Bali High is Calling!]


Inflectionally Yours
Bali Lawmaker Join Chorus Calling for Elimination of Road Side Cafes Seen as Major Source of HIV/AIDS Infections in Bali

The Jakarta Globe and the National News Agency Antara report that a Bali legislator warned on Monday, December 5, 2011, that Bali’s relatively high rate of HIV/AIDS infection is linked to the prevalence of “cafes” operating o the roadsides across the island.

Echoing a warning made repeatedly by Bali’s governor Made Mangku Pastika, Ketut Kariyasa Adnyana of the Bali House of Representatives (DPRD-Bali) links growing infection rates with the “café” or community bars that often serve as a front for prostitution.

Said Adnyana: .

“Cafes have spread into remote villages on the island. The condition is worrying because of the high spread of HIV and AIDS. Many of the victims are housewives who got infected from their husbands.”



Speaking plainly and saying the “cafes” are fronts for commercial sex, Aradnyana points to the high level of HIV/AIDS infections detected among prostitutes in Bali. He also praised governor Pastika’s efforts to close down unlicensed and illegal cafes, urging prostitution to be centralized for better control.

A female lawmaker, Utami Dwi Suryadi, told husbands to “think twice” before frequenting “café.” “If the husband spreads the disease to the wives, who will suffer?” she said. “The children might lose their parents and even their future.”



Related Articles

[Cafe Society ala Bali]

[You Don’t Want What’s On the Menu]
 
[Time to Get Serious About 'Kafes']
 
[Pubs that Rub Bali the Wrong Way]
 
[Governor Calls for Closure of Illicit Cafes]
 


We Need a Little Christmas!
Join a Festive Program of Yuletide Music, Dance and Drama in Sanur on Friday, December 16, 2011

You’re invited to join a Sanur community celebration of the Christmas Season featuring song, music, drama and dance on the evening of Friday, December 16, 2011.
ose slated to appear:
  • The Bali Community Choir under the direction of Brendan O'Donnell
  • Narwastu Gong directed by I Wayan Rajeg
  • Polish Soprano Ilona Grichot
  • Yuletide Dialogues written by local writer Dirck Lewis
  • Christmas Carols
Refreshments prepared by the ladies of the Gateway Community Church

All are welcome!

GCC
Jalan Danau Batur #3
(Near Bali International School and Canang Sari Restaurant)
Sanur, Denpasar, Bali

For more information telephone: ++62(0)81338721067


The Bicycle Diaries
Solo Exhibition of Paintings and Installations by Nyoman Sujana Kenyem in Ubud December 18, 2011 – January 18, 2012 at Komaneka Fine Art Gallery

The Bicycle Diaries

Paintings by Nyoman Sujana Kenyem

Komaneka Fine Art Gallery

December 18, 2011 – January 18, 2012
Open Daily 8:00 am, until 8:00 p.m.

Jalan Monkey Forest
Ubud, Gianyar, Bali

Telephone ++62-(0)361-976090
[Email
[Website
> KENYEM’S BICYCLE DIARIES
by Jean Couteau

“I came upon the theme of the bicycle by mere chance,” says Kenyem with his usual smile, “by recalling my days as a student at Ubud’s junior high school. I rode my bicycle to get to school. Everything was so calm and natural. Now, things have changed. One is not secure anymore on the roads. The traffic is heavy. If some people, now, take to riding a bicycle instead of a motorbike, it is as a reaction. It is their way to protest against the changes that have taken place. It is for all these reasons that I have taken up the theme of the bicycle,” he concludes, chuckling.

What does one see in these works? Bicycles and riders set against various backgrounds of leaves and nature. Here they ride against the whirling of cosmic forces; there they pedal casually up a slope. In other works a single rider perches on the top of a man’s head or on the stretched arm or leg of a woman. But always the bicycle, and always a little rider man—who is not actually riding, but standing on his bike.

Kenyem is visibly letting himself go. He dreams, apparently aimlessly. Of the past. Of the need to move forward. Of his insignificance compared to nature. Of love. But always, in all these works—and here he rejoins the theme of his previous works—he features himself (the rider), Nature and the world. Can it be said that the underlying theme he is exploring is no different from before: the relation between microcosm and macrocosm? Perhaps, but it must be added that he presents it here in a more relaxed and spontaneous way. His approach has become non-intellectual: he talks about himself, and it is through himself that he happens to question his own position with regard to nature and the world. He is no longer making any statement about his Hindu-Balinese identity. This identity simply appears in the transparency of his dreams. Thus his expression is more natural, more from the heart.

It is only in the three-dimensional expression of his creativity—his bamboo installation— that Kenyem’s love of nature and questioning of his place in it takes the connotation of a statement. The installation consists of a triangular bamboo structure standing in the middle of the gallery’s pool. Small mirrors are stuck on its sides. The structure symbolizes the world, calling to mind the Mandara Giri (cosmic Mountain) as it stands in the milky sea, here the pool. When we look at the mirrors, it is our own images that come back, with a haunting question: what have we done to this world?

Simple, neat, and direct: such are the works, such is the smiling man.


See Indonesia First!
Tourism Minister Pangestu Focuses on Domestic Tourism as Safety Measure in the Face of Uncertain World Economy

The Indonesian government is urging its citizens to take visit domestic holiday destinations in order to strengthen the national economy.

The Minister of Tourism and the Creative Economy, Mari Elka Pangestu, told Bisnis.com that domestic tourists give a positive impact across a whole range of national economic sectors.

The potential of the domestic tourism market offers insurance to the Indonesian economy in withstanding the vagaries of the uncertain current world economy. “Indonesian tourism is not immune to crisis, but the domestic market offers a safety belt for the national economy,” explained Pangestu at a seminar of the outlook for tourism in 2012 with the theme “optimizing the creative economy for Indonesian tourism.”

The Minister cited data form the World Tourism Organization (WTO) that shows negative overall growth in world tourism over a 15-month period in 2010 and 2011. The Minister predicts that the current economic crisis and uncertainty will remain a fact of life for at least several years into the future.

“But don’t worry, because the potential of domestic tourism is strong. In 2010 a total of 234 domestic trips were taken in Indonesia generating an income of Rp. 150.49 trillion (US$16.7 billion),” essured the Minister. For this reason, Pangestu is optimistic that domestic tourism remains the “safety belt” of Indonesia’s overall tourism economy.

This advantageous position is further bolstered by its ranking at #39 for cultural heritage among 139 countries worldwide, as measured by the World Economic Forum. The Minister boasted that Indonesia is home to eight World Heritage Cultural Sites and as such has strong potential as the site for festivals and exhibitions linked to the creative economy.

Moreover, points out Pangestu, the majority of Indonesians are in the productive age of less than 29 years, which is another positive indication for the domestic tourism industry.


A Tree Grows in Singapdu
Bali Zoo Coordinate Planting of 1,000 Trees in Singapadu

Within the framework of national celebrations to mark a day set aside to honor plants and animals life (Hari Cinta Puspa and Satwa 2011) and provincial programs to create a “clean and green Bali,” around 700 residents of the traditional village of Singapadu and local school children joined forces to plant 1,000 tree on an area surrounding the Pura Dalem and Pura Bumi Desa temples in Singapadu, just north of Denpasar,
 
The planting program was held on Saturday, December 10, 2011, in areas adjoining the Bali Zoo in Singapadu.

The community-based tree-planting program was lead by the Regent of Gianyar, Dr. Tjokorda Oka Artha Ardhana (Cok Ace). The regent told the group: “planting trees is very useful in protecting the planet from a variety of threats. Because of this, I hope that we will all continue to protect the environment, with one of the concrete steps being the planting of trees in our living spaces.”

Cok Ace went on to explain the importance in tree plantings of selecting threatened tree species, medicinal plants and trees whose flowers and leaves are use for ceremonial purposes. By selecting plants such as these, according to the Regent, the trees will be valued and protected by the public for years to come.

Participating and supporting the tree planting exercise, the Director of the Bali Zoo, Anak Agung Gde Putra, told of the Zoo’s desire to help create a green and clean environment through the support of conservation and projects to improve the local environment.

Shown on Balidiscovery.com is the Regent of Gianyar,, Dr. Tjokorda Oka Artha Ardhana, planting one of the 1,000 trees now nurturing in their new home at Singapdu.


A Classical Christmas in Bali
Two Chirstmas Concerts Not to be Mised in Bali December 28 and 29, 2011.

Two talent-filled evenings of classical music will highlight the holiday season in Bali this year with concert programs featuring world-caliber artists in two performances on December 28 and 29, 2011.
ormers:

The Pianists
  • Boris Kraljevic – A Montenegrin pianist now teaching at the Nanyang Academy of Fine Arts in Singapore
  • Neil Franks – a student of Prof Kraljevic and now an accomplished pianist in his own right
  • Ariana Jacob – among the “new generation” of French pianist, Jacob has studied with Catherine Collard and Dominique Merlet. She enjoys a busy international recording and performance schedule.
  • Chang Tou Liang – a talented man of many parts, Dr. Chang is a practicing family physician, a classical music reviewer for the Straits Times in Singapore, and the former Artistic Director of the Singapore International Piano Festival.

Violinist
  • Yoojin Jung – a South Korean native who has performed with orchestras in her homelands and with the Budapest Festival Orchestra. Past performances have garnered honors in New Zealand and South Korea.
 
Flautists 
  • Philippe Bernold – a past winner of the Jean-Pierre Rampal International Flute Competition, Bernold is a leading representative of the French school of flute.
  • Beomjae Kim – an accomplished performer who has participated in concerts in the United States, Europe and Asia, The December concert will mark a return appearance in Bali, one of his favorite stops on a busy schedule of international performance. In early 2012, Jim will perform with the Oberlin Chamber Orchestra under the direction of Raphael Jiménez.
Soprano
  • Nancy Yuen – Born in Hong Kong but now resident in Singapore, Nancy Yuen Miu Fen graduated from the Royal Academy of Music in London and has appeared with the Welsh National Opera, English National Opera, West Australian Opera, Opera Queensland, Northern Ireland Opera and the Singapore National Opera. Her signature role is a Cio-cio-san in Madama Butterfly, but she also commands a wide repertoire encompassing Violetta in La Traviata, Gilda in Rigoletto, Rosalinda in Die Fledermaus, the title role in Tosca, Mimi in La Boheme, Pamina in The Magic Flute, Donna Anna in Don Giovanni and Liu in Turandot. She is the head of the Vocal Studies Department at the Nanyang Academy of Fine Arts in Singapore.
 
Two Performances

The rare nights of outstanding classical performance will feature the works of Puccini, Beethoven, Liszt, Rachmaninov and Chopin.

  • Wednesday, December 28, 2011 – Hotel Tugu Bali at 7:00 p.m.
  • Thursday, December 29, 2011 – Canggu Club at 7:00 p.m.
Tickets

Rp. 550,000 (US$61) for concert and buffet dinner.
Rp. 300,000 (US$33) for concert only.

Reservations are essential:

Hotel Tugu Bali, Jalan Pantai Batu Bolong +62 (0)361 4731 701 [email]

Canggu Club, Jalan Pantai Berawa  +62 (0)361 844 6385


To the Highest Bidder
Bali’s First Wine Auction Draws Crowds While Raising Funds for Wine Education for Island’s Hospitality Workers.

Bali’s first Wine Auction was held on Sunday, December 11, 2011, in the ballroom of the AYANA Resort and Spa Bali.
50 participants participated in a “brown bag” wine tasting – a blind sampling of wines with the vintages only identified after the tasting concluded.

The highlight of the afternoon was an auction of 24 lots of wine, luxury dining experiences, wine books, and accommodation packages. Bidding from the auction website and the auction floor was brisk for the auction items with an overall value exceeding US$20,000.

Proceeds for the day will be donated to a wine education fund for young Indonesian hospitality workers administered by the Bali Hotels Association (BHA).

The Bali Wine Auction was created by Lotus Food Services – the purveyor of quality food and beverages to Bali’s hospitality industry.

Acting as main sponsors for the tasting and auction were the AYANA Resort and Spa Bali, Artisan Estate Wines, Bogocitra Nusapratama and King Island Dairy.

Shown on Balidiscovery.com are snapshots taken during the Bali Wine Auction.



A Lot to Learn
Illiteracy and School Drop Out Rates Remain a Major Problem in Bali.

According to the State News Agency Antara, if all the grade and middle school student in Bali originating from impoverished family were gathered in one location their number would total 92,926 – enough to fill Indonesia’s national sports stadium in Jakarta.

The Spokesman for the province of Bali, I Ketut Teneng, added to the above statistic, saying: “What’s more, Bali has 233,385 illiterate people between the ages of 15 and 44 years.” In other words, nearly 6% of Bali's total population put at 4 million cannot read or write.

The drop out rate last year among high school student is put at 1,315 students while 2,216 students finishing grade school did not re-enroll for a middle school program. Similarly, some 3,965 students did not continue on to high school after completing their junior high school program. Educators cite the economic inability of parents as the leading cause for students’ not continuing schooling in Bali.

Teneng explained that the provincial government of Bali has allocated funds together with additional funding from Jakarta, saying, “this funding includes scholarship assistance for students from poor families.”

Another steps being undertaken to retain students and reduce poverty is the modification of a number of High Schools into trade schools in an effort to equipped students with skills that are more readily marketable to Bali’s job markets.


Be Our Guest, Be Our Guest
Bali’s Customs Office Pledges to Create Positive First Impression for Conference and Convention Delegates Arriving in Bali.

During a Seminar on meetings, incentives, conferences and exhibitions (MICE) conducted by the Indonesian Conference and Convention Association (INCCA) on Thursday, December 8, 2011, the Directorate General of Customs and Excise pledged to improve services to inbound flights and passengers coming to Bali.

As reported by Bisnis Bali, I Made Wijaya, the head of the Customs office at Bali’s Ngurah Rai Airport said his team was committed to provide a positive “first landing impression” for Bali’s international visitors.

While the Custom’s office is committed to its main task of preventing the importation of illegal goods and contraband, Wijaya said the overall service commitment of his corps is to provide a service “that is primarily dedicated to integrity, good communication and a good image.”

Special handling procedures and dedicated channels for delegates attending major conferences and event in Bali are also available to facilitate major events hosted in Bali.

While Made Wijaya said his department had fixed rules and procedures, this did not preclude special arrangements for VIP and VVIP guests attending major events in Bali. While all visitors must submit to Customs officials whose duty is to inspect all imported goods, this function can be modified and moved to areas outside the custom’s areas for VIP movements.


In with New, Out with the Old
Garuda Selling Old Aircraft to Make Way for New Aircraft.

Garuda Indonesia has sold four of its Boeing 737-400 aircraft to a Nigerian airline, one unit to a competing Indonesian carrier and a sixth aircraft to the Indonesian Air Force.

To replace these aircraft Garuda is in the process of refreshing its armada with the delivery of six new Boeing 737-800 NG aircraft and two new Airbus 330-200s.

Quoted by Bisnis.com, the CEO of Garuda Indonesia, Emirsyah Satar, said “these steps have been take to rejuvenate the fleet next year by phasing out seven Boeing 737-400s.” He explained that the sale of aircraft to the Nigerian airline was done through an open auction conducted in September 2011. Adding, “the plan is for these four airplanes to be delivered next year with the four aircraft now undergoing repairs.”

Emirsyah explained that Garuda has also sold one plane to the Indonesian Air Force and another to an unnamed Indonesian air carrier.
 
The financial director of Garuda Indonesia, Elisa Lumbantoruan, confirmed that the price of each plane sole to the Nigerians ranged between US$ 3 - US$5 million.
 
The sale of the aircraft is part of an overall program by the airlines to reduce the average age of their fleet from 12 years to 7 years. The sold aircraft will be replaced in 2012 by the six Boeing 737-800s and two Airbus 330-200s.


Making Tanah Lot a Whole Lot Better
New Management of Tanah Lot and Tabanan Administration Want to Make Bali Tourist Complex a World Class Destination.

The regional administration of Tabanan have announced its intention to make the improvements in the areas surrounding Bali’s iconic Tanah Lot Temple a top priority in the future management of that popular tourist destination in Bali.
 
Among the specific area slated for attention in 2012 are improvement in information systems, better parking facilities, destination promotion, trash and waste management, dedicated pedestrian walkways, improved traffic control and lighting.
 
As reported by The Bali Post, leaders in Tabanan hope the improvements will not only help develop the areas surrounding the Tanah Lot temple but also create employment opportunities. These aspirations were given voice during an initial meeting between the regent of Tabanan, Ni Putu Eka Wiryastuti, the vice-regent of Tabanan, Gde Sanjaya, and the operational manager of the agency charged with managing Tanah Lot held on Wednesday, December 7, 2011.
 
The meeting, lend by the chairman of the Management Agency for Tanah Lot and the Regent discussed a number of issues including considering concrete steps which can be implemented in 2012 by the newly appointed management board.
 
The newly appoint Tanah Lot manager, Ketut Toya Adnyana, said that in the short term he will concentrate on instilling discipline and upgrading work place synergy and enhancing the welfare of workers at the popular religious site which also attracts million of tourist each year. He also plans to create special souvenirs for travel agents, repair the infrastructure and the hosting of a major cultural event in June 2012.
 
“Long term programs include working with various agencies of the government to improve the supporting facilities connected with Tanah Lot Temple. I hope that in the future we will formulate programs that will give a felling of safety and convenience to tourist visitors, permitting the number of visitors to grow each year,” explained Adnyana.
 
Based on Regulation No 40 of 2011 issued by the regency of Tabanan on the structure, organization, membership and responsibilities of the management board for the Tanah Lot Temple complex, the management responsibilities for the area are to be shared by the government and the surrounding traditional villages.

“I hope the total structure of the management board, both the chairman and the supporting staff, will undertake the duties and responsibilities in accordance with is assigned duties and function. To this end there needs to be better coordination between the related government agency so that the Tanah Lot Complex retains its place as an international tourism icon and improves in quality in the future,” said Tabanan regent Eka Wiryastuti.


Sticking Your Neck Out in Bali
Bali Taman Safari & Marine Park Takes Delivery of Two Giraffes - the World’s Tallest Animal.

The Bali Safari & Marine Park has recently welcomed two giraffes to its substantial collection of more than 60 species and 600 animals.
 
Hans Manansang, general manager of the Bali Safari & Marine Park, told the National News Agency Antara, “the two giraffes came from Germany and Canada.” He went on to explain that the animals were both approximately two years old and intentionally sourced from two separate locales to encourage a diversified gene pool in keeping with “best practice” for animal conservation.
 
Hans told the press how that before the animals arrived in Bali the Gianyar facility undertook extensive infrastructure preparations to ensure the new animals would adapt to and enjoy their new home in Bali. “We prepared an enclosure and grounds to create an environment that mirrors their original home,” said Hans.
 
In keeping with Bali Safari and Marine Park’s award-winning ways in animal conservation, the two giraffes will hopefully prosper and multiply in Bali.
 
The procedures to import the giraffes to Bali were not overcomplicated as their import is not outlawed or forbidden. “Actually, we have many plans to bring more animals, but at this time the government forbids the important of many animals  due to rabies concern, so we have had to delay such plans,” Hans said.
 
Explaining further, Hans told how the current ban on the import and export of animals to Bali concerns carnivores and includes lions, tigers, monkeys, dogs and cats.
 
Visit the Bali Safari and Marine Park
 
Jungle Hoppe Package – Bali Safari and Marine Park
 
Leopard Package – Bali Safari and Marine Park

Rhino Package – Bali Safari and Marine Park

Tiger Package – Bali Safari and Marine Park



More Violence Hits Kuta
Off-Duty Military Guard Shoots Security Guard at Santa Fe Café in Seminyak, Bali.

Kuta after dark added to its unwanted reputation for crime and violence last week when an off-duty military officer shot and seriously wounded a security guard working at the Santa Fe Bar in Seminyak.
 
Wayan Surata was shot in the early hour of Monday, December 5, 2011, with shots allegedly fired by First Corporal Agus Muklas. Muklas reportedly fills an intelligence role with the Udayana Military command.
 
Muklas was known to frequent the Santa Fe Bar where he once worked as a part-time security guard, a position he eventually resigned due to illness.
 
He was apprehended by military police a few hours after the shooting which left the Balinese security guard in the intensive care unit of Bali’s Sanglah Hospital.
 

One source told the local press that Muklas shot the guard who he claims insulted him.
 
Military police continue to investigate the case.


A Trinity Solution to an Unholy Problem
Three-in-One Traffic Scheme Proposed to Reduce Traffic Congestion in Bali.

Following the introduction of the Trans Sarbagita Bus System in an effort to reduce traffic congestion in Bali, a member of the Denpasar House of Representative (DPRD-Denpasar), Ketut Resmiasa, is suggesting that Denpasar should adopt a “three-in-one” traffic rule similar to that in operation in Indonesia’s capital city of Jakarta.

“Three-in-one” traffic rules try to reduce traffic congestion by ruling  that cars cannot enter certain busy areas with less than 3 occupants on board.

As reported by The Bali Post, Resmiasa said: “In my opinion, the three-in-one system can be introduced in Denpasar.”

Resmiasa who is head of the Indonesia Raya Faction at the DPRD-Denpasar, says the new bus system alone is insufficient to answer the problems of traffic congestion in Bali, making a "three-in-one" system needed.


Sky Aviation to Lombok and Komodo
Sky Aviation Inaugurates New Service from Bali to Lombok and Komodo – West Flores.

Sky Aviation has formally inaugurated air service between Denpasar and Labuan Bajo, Flores and between Denpasar and Lombok on Saturday, December 3, 2011.

The first flight utilizing a Fokker 50 aircraft departing for Lombok left Bali’s Ngurah Rai Airport at 9:00 a.m. landing at the Lombok International Airport 30 minutes later. After a short stopover in Lombok the flight continues on to the Komodo Airport, located in Labuan Bajo, West Flores.

The Fokker 50 aircraft operated by Sky Aviation is configured to carry 50 passengers.

The airline has declared its desire to secure two additional Fokker 50 aircraft  and12 Sukhoi Superjet 100s.

In order to move ahead with the purchase of the Russian-built Sukhoi jets, Sky Aviation is awaiting formal safety certification of the jet by  European Aviation authorities.

The Sukhoi Superjet 100s can fly at 0.81 Mach and have a maximum operational height of 40,000 feet.


Robin Lim CNN Hero of the Year
Robin Lim, American Mid-wide Working in Ubud, Bali Named CNN Hero of the Year.

Broadcast internationally to millions around the world, “Ibu” Robin Lim, an American woman living in Ubud, Bali and operating the Bumi Sehat Foundation providing health care, birthing services and prenatal care, was named CNN Hero of the year during a December 11, 2011 (Los Angeles time) live broadcast.
g amongst 10 finalists selected by CNN for their humanitarian works,  Robin Lim said: "Every baby's first breath on Earth could be one of peace and love. Every mother should be healthy and strong. Every birth could be safe and loving. But our world is not there yet."

A dedicated midwife who turns no one away seeking her assistance, Robin Lim will receive a US$250,000 award from CNN, supplementing US$50,000 already received following her naming to the list of 10 finalists.

Lim works to reduce high maternal and infant mortality rates in Indonesia by providing affordable medical care.

Wearing a batik dress from Indonesia, Lim tearfully accepted the award handed to her by CNN’s Anderson Cooper.

Plans are now underway in Bali to welcome back Robin Lim, a local hero of long standing and now the CNN Hero of the Year for 2011.
 
[Bumi Sehat Foundation]



 
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August 14, 2006

Bali Update #517
August 07, 2006

Bali Update #516
July 31, 2006

Bali Update #515
July 24, 2006

Bali Update #514
July 17, 2006

Bali Update #513
July 10, 2006

Bali Update #512
July 03, 2006

Bali Update #511
June 26, 2006

Bali Update #510
June 19, 2006

Bali Update #509
June 12, 2006

Bali Update #508
June 05, 2006

Bali Update #507
May 29, 2006

Bali Update #506
May 22, 2006

Bali Update #505
May 15, 2006

Bali Update #504
May 08, 2006

Bali Update #503
May 01, 2006

Bali Update #502
April 24, 2006

Bali Update #501
April 17, 2006
 

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