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Bali Discovery Tours
Komplek Pertokoan
Sanur Raya No. 27
Jl. By Pass Ngurah Rai,
Sanur, Bali, Indonesia

Tel:
++62 361 286 283

Fax:
++62 361 286 284

U.S.A. Fax:(toll free)
1-800-506-8633

U.K. Fax:
++44-20-7000-1235

Australian Fax:
++61-2-94750419

24h:
++62 812 3819724

Bali Discovery

SITE PATA ASITA
Bali News by Bali Update
BALI UPDATE #955 - 22 December 2014

IN THIS UPDATE


Bad Weather Claims Lives in Kintamani
Heavy Rains Bring Flooding, Landslides and 6 Deaths to North Bali

Kompas.com reports that heavy rains on the night of Tuesday, March 14, 2012, caused a series of landslides that destroyed rice terraces and at least one hotel.

The spokesman of the National Disaster Agency (BNPB), Sutopo Purwo Nugroho, told the press in Jakarta that the Hotel Bali Handara at the Handara Kosaido Golf Course suffered flooding and landslide damage.

“There were 35 rooms that were damaged. There were 14 separate landslides in the area, with 8 local road closings resulting in traffic disruption across the Buleleng regency. The BPBD provincial and regency offices in cooperation with the Public Works Department are dealing with the landslides.

Roads were reported to be open again at 1:00 pm on Wednesday with traffic moving normally throughout the area.

Deaths Reported

Detik.com said that 6 people lost their lives due to the adverse weather and resulting flooding and landslides in the village of Belandingan, Kintamani in the regency of Bangli.

Only four bodies have been recovered with authorities still searching for the remaining two who are presumed dead.

The two missing victims, according to Kompas.com, are siblings who authority suspect were caught in a landslide and then swept down a local river.

The four confirmed dead ranges in age from 9 to 38 years.
 


An Interrupted Trip to China
Batavia Air Flight from Bali to Guangzhou Sinks into Runway at Balikpapan

A Batavia Air Airbus 320, carrying 177 passengers and 10 crew, flying from Bali to Guangzhou, China had one of its wheels sink into a part of the runway at Sepinggan International Airport in Balikpapan (Kalimantan) on Monday, March 12, 2012.

The plane was performing a technical stop in Balikpapan for refueling and immigration formalities.

The incident closed the airport for two hours, but no injuries were reported among passengers or crew.

According to The Jakarta Globe a portion of the landing way’s total length remained closed for an extended perido as the aircraft's rear tire remained bogged down at the runway’s edge.

Special lifting bags from Jakarta had to be flown to Balikpapan to free the airplane, which was eventually towed to the apron area.


Youíre in the Best of Hands
Our Advice: Donít Order Anything at AYANA Resortís Dava Restaurant. Leave that to the Expert.

A word to the wise. When confronted by someone generally acknowledged as a talented young Turk of the culinary world in a discussion of “what should I order tonight?” the best thing to order is perhaps “nothing.”

This is especially the case when the kitchen genius in question is Jusman So, the Chef de Cuisine at Dava – the fine dining venue at the AYANA Resort and Spa Bali.

Before moving to Bali, Jusman So had achieved singularity as one of Singapore's most acclaimed chefs. His 40-seat fine dining restaurant, Sage, was nominated “Best New Restaurant” at the World Gourmet Summit 2008, the same year he won “Best Rising Chef” by Singapore Tatler magazine, and named to the prestigious Miele List in 2010.

Since his move to paradise and assuming the reins at Dava, Jusman has introduced new menus with modern French flairs and popular signature dishes enhanced by local flavors and the best available ingredients.

But, seriously, our earnest recommendation remains to never bother ordering anything when Jusman joins you at your tableside for a pre-dinner discussion.

To this end, Jusman So and Dava have recently launched what they are calling “Four-Course Surprise Menus.”

The experience begins with a personal discussion with Jusman of broad food preferences, specific disliked foods, dietary restrictions and food allergies. This information in hand and the direct opportunity to meet his diners over a “foodie chat”  allows Jusman to  then disappear to the kitchen to prepare a customized meal, based on the Chef's spontaneous inspiration and the best ingredients uncovered at local markets and from establish suppliers that morning.

The four-courses that soon arrive at your table are both delightful and surprising, revealed with subdued fanfare by well-trained service staff explaining the ingredients and their preparation method.

"We are receiving very positive feedback from guests who enjoy the anticipation and fun of a 'Surprise Menu' and who are happy to put complete faith in the chef and my choices," said Jusman.  "I personally enjoy it too, as it allows me to be more spontaneous and creative on a daily basis, using ingredients that are often harder to find and therefore may not be on the main menu. For example, certain types of seafood may not be available every day, but when they are, I'm able to use them for this new menu to offer guests something different and extra special."

Offered alongside Dava's regular a la carte and nightly degustation menus, the Four-Course Surprise Menu is also attractively priced at Rp 450,000++ per person (US$60.50).

Prepared to be most pleasantly surprised.

Related Links

[Anything But ‘So-So’]

[In Bali it’s Just So!]

[AYANA Resort and Spa Bali]


Follow On Effects of Australian Storm Felt in Bali
Australian Tropical Storm Center Causing Weather Problems in Bali

Metrotvnews.com reports that a tropical storm sweeping across Western Australia since Tuesday, March 13, 2012, is sending large waves of between four and five meters to the southern and northern shores of the island of Bali.

The head of the Denpasar Meteorology, Climatology and Geophysics Agency (BMKG), Nyoman Suarsa, said that commencing Wednesday, March 14, 2012, four-meters were striking the northern shore of Bali, while on the island’s southern shore waves as high as five-meters were being recorded.

This condition is expected to continue until Friday, March 16, 2012, according to Suarsa.

The areas affected by high waves in the south include Nusa Dua, Uluwatu and Kuta beach. The high waves are also bringing high winds and rain to Bali.

On Tuesday high rains caused flooding, bridge failures and landslides in the Bedugul and Kintamani areas of Bali. 6 people lost their lives in landslides that swept through the hillsides of Kintamani on the night of Tuesday, March 13, 2012.

Meanwhile, the straits connecting Java and Bali remain relatively unaffected by the high wave action.

Related Article

[Bad Weather Claims Lives in Kintamani]



When the Taps Run Dry
35,000 Bali Residents Temporarily Lose Public Water Supply Due to Bad Weather and Land Slides

The heavy rains in Bali of Tuesday, March 13, 2012, are cited as the cause of flooding, landslides, road closures and the death of 6 people in Kintamani. Officials at the PDAM – the public water board for Bali, are also blaming the storm for a lack of clean tap water affecting some 35,000 residents of Bali’s capital of Denpasar.

Detik.com quotes the head of production for PDAM in Denpasar, I Made Tarka, saying, “The reason PDAM could not operate yesterday (March 13) was that reservoirs rose above the normal standards for murkiness (particulate matter) due to landslides that ocurred in Kintamani.”

Thoselandslides, he explained, increased the murkiness of the Ayung River which flows from Kintamani to Denpasar. Tarka declared that the Ayung River is the supply of source waters processed by PDAM Denpasar for delivery to the city’s residents.

“Because we could not operate, we could only serve 50% of our 70,000 customers in Denpasar,” Tarka explained.

Related Articles


[Follow On Effects of Australian Storm Felt in Bali]

[Bad Weather Claims Lives in Kintamani]


And the Rockets Red Glare
Bali Police Outlaw Use of Fireworks and Firecrackers Over Nyepi Holiday Period

In the lead up to Nyepi - Bali’s day of absolute silence – that heralds the start of the New Year on the Bali-Hindu calendar, police in Bali have issued a order outlawing the use of fireworks and firecrackers on the long night of celebration on the New Year’s Eve.

The warning follows a large number of tragic accidents blamed on incendiary devices over the December 31, 2011 New Year’s period.

Quoted by Kompas.com, Police Commissioner Hariadi, in announcing the ban, said, “We ask that there be no fireworks, firecrackers or similar devices because this will disrupt community peace during a period of religious devotion.”

The Bali police also reminded the public to avoid the consumption of alcoholic beverages on Nyepi Eve or the other holiday’s surrounding the holiday period in order to reduce the risk of violent incidents of criminal activity.

Bali will see a resurgence of colorful Ogoh-ogoh parades on Nyepi Eve this year due to the lifting of bans on this activity in many areas of Bali and government subsidies paid to youth groups who construct the large parade floats.

Related Articles

[We Interrupt this Broadcast]

[Prayers Offered in Silence]

[Silent Days and Silent Nights]

[In Support of Creativity]
 


Courting Culture at the Courtyard
Courtyard by Marriott at Nusa Dua, Bali Works to Connect Guests with Indonesian Culture

Bali’s newly opened Courtyard by Marriott Bali in the Nusa Dua Complex of South Bali has launched a family cultural calendar aimed at bringing their guests closer to the island’s rich cultural heritage.
e are witnessing significant interest from families seeking the multitude of learning activities and entertainment on offer both within the resort and Nusa Dua complex,” said Courtyard by Marriott Bali general manager Jeff Tyler. “Throughout the property and within an easeful stroll away are well recognized surfing and water sport opportunities as well as golf and shopping but it’s the lesser known and quality cultural pursuits that our guests are now beginning to discover.”

Partnering with the Bali Nusa Dua Theatre and its signature production [Devdan – Treasure of the Archipelago]  – a cultural extravaganza of dance, music and high-wire acrobatics is performed just a short distance from the hotel the hotel provides to and from the show. As described by Stephen Lomax, Bali Nusa Dua Theatre general manager, “The show is really a marvel to watch, a tour de force of high-energy featuring a fusion of traditional Indonesian costume and dance, even ‘hip hop,’ choreographed with aerial acrobatics and hi-tech special effects.”

The Courtyard by Marriott Bali's other cultural partner, [Museum Pasifika]  a facility Tyler describes as one of the island’s best-kept secrets. “Here you have programs for all ages interested in learning more about traditional and contemporary art from Bali, Southeast Asia and the South Pacific.” Along with masterpieces from the renowned local artists like Raden Saleh and Affandi, the museum exhibits the work of expatriate artists including original paintings from Paul Gauguin, Theo Meier, Le Mayeur, Rudolf Bonnet and Arie Smith.

“The museum is a splendid inspiration for young guests with drawing competitions and sketching for kids, and along with the resort’s kid’s activities and special privileges together with our Kid’s Club, a family is kept well occupied,” said Tyler. Also aimed at entertain the younger set, The Courtyard by Marriott Kid’s Club is equipped with a ball house, movie room, and library as well as computers and game consoles. Cultural activities consist of Balinese art and crafts, and Balinese offering rituals, traditional Balinese dress up, and dancing courses.

Guests staying at Courtyard by Marriott Bali receive complimentary shuttle service between the hotel and the Bali Nusa Dua Theater and the Pasifika Museum. Hotel guest can also be treated to a complimentary 30-minute backstage tour of the Devdan theatrical production

[Book a Stay at Courtyard by Marriott Bali]
 


Taking Exception to Exceptions
Bali Governor Pastikaís $16.6 million Suit Against Bali Post Continues

The ongoing lawsuit by Bali governor Made Mangku Pastika against a leading local newspaper The Bali Post continued in the Denpasar District Court on Monday, March 12, 2012.

In the latest court session, the governor’s legal team replied to legal exceptions filed by the newspaper’s attorneys. As reported by Radar Bali and Bali Post, one of the governor’s lawyers, I Nyoman Sumantha, refuted the newspaper’s assertion that their suit required powers of attorney signed by the traditional villages of Bali, religious leaders and the public in general. Citing a 2004 law on provincial governance, Sumantha told the Court that the governor’s right to represent the people of Bali was a matter of law.

During the same proceedings, Sumantha listed a number of points of law rejecting the legal exceptions of The Bali Post. The governor, as plaintiff in the case, discounted The Bali Post's assertion that the case should be removed from civil court and handled under the National Press Law. Citing a similar case in which businessman Tommy Winata sued Tempo Magazine, Sumantha told how Winata won his case without resorting to the press law.

The governor’s attorneys also again rejected news carried by Bali Post on September 19, 2011, that incorrectly quoted the governor as calling for the abolition of traditional villages (Desa Pakraman) following civil unrest in the villages of Kemoning and Budaga. The attorneys told the Court, “The reporter from The Bali Post was not in attendance during the governor’s visit (to the villages), but only obtained his news from another mass media member, changing that news so it no longer resembled the original.” The governor’s lawyers continued, saying the defendants failed to check the veracity of their news with the governor’s office. Adding, “It's clear that the Bali Post news was not obtained from a credible news source.”

Responding to the newspaper’s assertion that no law had been broken in the case, Pastika’s attorneys told the Court they believe that a violation of the journalistic code of ethics was also a violation of the law.

Meanwhile, a lawyer for The Bali Post, Gde Sudhiantara, remained steadfast in asking that the case be settled under the National Press Law. He said this approach would avoid the case from becoming overly complicated.

According to Sudhiantara: “The plaintiff complaint uses the words ‘check and balance,’ saying the news was not credible. This means that the basis (of the complaint) is the Press Law. If, in fact, it is determined that a violation has occurred, then it should be resolved under the Press Law No. 40 of 1999.”

Related Articles

[Pick a Little, Talk a Little, Pick a Little]  

[Governor Pastika Prepared to Fight 'Till the Death]

[Press Freedom Means Never Having to Say You’re Sorry]


Justice Delayed
Jakarta Businessman Paul Handoko Sentenced by Supreme Court to Three Months in Prison for Involvement in Bali Property Fraud Case

A legal case that dates back to 2009 has entered a new phase following a Supreme Court decision that will send Jakarta businessman Paul Handoko to prison for 3 months.

After being freed on appeal in 2010 following his conviction for assault of Radar Bali (Jawa Post Group) photographer, Miftahuddin Halim, Paul Handoko now looks certain to spend some months in the Bali prison. A decision of the Supreme Court has declared Handoko guilty of knowingly using falsified documents in a matter before the law. This was in connection with a case of falsifying land and building certificates for the Villa Batu Jimbar, Sanur, held by a Singaporean businessman.

In the decision of the Supreme Court the presiding judge sentenced Paul to three months prison under the criminal code.

This means that the lower court’s demand of 6 months from public prosecutor Nyoman Sucitrawan was reduced to just 3 months in the appeal process.

On March 14, 2012, the junior administrator for the criminal division at the Denpasar District Court, I Gede Rantam, confirmed that he had received a copy of the judicial ruling on November 24, 2011.

Meanwhile, the public prosecutor, Sucitrawan, confirmed separately that he, too, had received notification of the Supreme Court’s decision. Unfortunately, his office is precluded from executing the sentence against Paul Handoko until complete documents relating to the Court’s decision arrive in Denpasar.

“We have just been informed that the case against Paul Handoko came down with a sentence of three months in prison. We have yet to receive a complete copy of the decision. Later, after we receive formal notification, will we execute the sentence by sending a summons to the convicted man. If, for instance, he does not answer we will ask the assistance of the police,” said Sucitrawan

Related Article

[Two Strikes for Paul Handoko]


More Balinese Food Aid for Germany
Banyan Tree Ungasan Bali Presents Indonesian Food In Scholls- Elmau, Germany April 3-10, 2012

Banyan Tree Ungasan, Bali is sharing the rich culinary traditions of Indonesia by sending two outstanding young chefs to Scholls-Elmau, Germany. Executive Sous Chef, Mandif Warokka, and Demi Chef de Partie, I Komang Sudarmika, are Germany-bound where they will showcase their skills at the legendary luxury hotel standing in the foothills of the Wetterstein Mountains.

Originally built in 1916, the Schloss-Elmau Resort sits between the communities of Garmisch and Mittenwald in Bavaria. The hotel, rebuilt after a fire in 2005, is famous as the venue for concerts by leading world musicians.

Chef Mandif, voted as The Best Chef in Bali 2011 by Hello Bali, readers will treat German diners to popular Indonesian dishes from Sumatra, Java, Sulawesi and Bali. These will include Beef Rendang (Indonesian chili-curried beef), Oxtail and Short Rib Soup Bandung style, Balinese Bebek Betutu (25 spices Balinese roasted duck wrapped in spring roll skin), Ayam Pelalah (Shredded chicken meat tossed with red chili sauce), Cramcam Sari Laut (Seafood melange with Balinese yellow curry broth) and Ikan Bakar Jimbaran (Grilled sea bass fillet served with sambal merah).

Related Sites

[Schloss-Elmau Resort]

[Bali Sends Food Aid to Germany]

[King of the Cliff at Banyan Tree's Jumana Restaurant]


Thoroughly Naughty Nuri
Wall Street Journal Sings Praises of the Ribs and Martinis on Offer at Naughty Nuriís Warung in Ubud, Bali

Angeline Yeo of the Wall Street Journal has written an informative review of one of our favorite restaurants in Ubud – Naughty Nuri’s Warung.

Deceptively simple and down-market in its outward appearance as an open air food stall with rough-hewn table and chairs, Bali “regulars” rave about “Naughty Nuri’s” succulent barbecued pork ribs and American-style martinis – each meticulously poured to a precarious meniscus.

The ribs and tender steaks are grilled on a sidewalk grill, imparting a smoky haze to the restaurant where other diners from the ubiquitous line at Nuri’s front will join any open spaces at your table.

It’s many an enjoyable night we recall at Nuri’s over a martini or two. And, there are other, less easily remembered evenings when, caution abandoned, we exceeded an unwritten and poorly-enforced two martini limit.

Good food at affordable prices, read all about it at [Food Fridays: Naughty Nuri's Warung]  from the Wall Street Journal.

Naughty Nuri’s Warung Ubud
Jalan Raya Sanggingan
Ubud, Bali, Indonesia
Telephone: ++62-(0)361-977 547

Naughty Nuri’s Warung Batubelig
Jalan Batubelig, 41
Kerobokan Kelod
Kuta, Bali, Indonesia
Telephone ++62-(0)361-847 6722.


Setback After Setback
Officials Visit by Lawmakers and Badung Officials To Alaia Echo Beach Project Reveals a Number of Zoning Issues

According to Radar Bali, an inspection of The Alaia Echo Beach Hotel project in Canggu by the Badung House of Representatives (DPRD-Badung) on Wednesday, March 14, 2012, revealed that the accommodation project is still without an official building permit (IMB), prompting the legislators to ask that the project be stopped and that several parts of the project in violation of zoning laws be quickly demolished.

“If not in conformance (with the rules), demolish it! If it doesn’t yet have an IMB, then halt the construction,” said Nyoman Satria, a member of Commission B of the DPRD-Bandung. He was part of the joint visit by Commission A and Commission B of the House to the hotel project led by the chairman of the DPRD-Badung, Nyoman Giri Prasta. Also in attendance were the head of the Badung Tourist Office (Kadisparda), Cok Raka Darmawan, the head of the Zoning Office (DCK) Ni Putu Dessy Dharmayanti, the head of the Badung Enforcement Agency (Kasatpol PP) Ketut Martha and a number of other Badung officials. The hotel’s owners were represented by Yan Gunawan.

The team entered into the first level of the hotel where Giri Prasta underlined that even though the project held a principle permit and environmental permits (UKL/UPL), the construction of the hotel must be stopped. “I ask that it be stopped. Complete the building permit (IMB) first,” he insisted.

Subsequent exploration of the site showed that the mandated minimum setback space from property lines had been consumed by the building’s construction at the property's southern, eastern and northern borders. On the southern edge of the land, they confirmed that problems persist with the adjoining land owned by David Candra, who is complaining at the illegal close proximity of the hotel’s structure.

Because an adjoining property owner continues to object, the legislators are insisting that regulated setback distances from the property lines be honored. Those rules, established by regency decree in 2003, provide for a minimum construction setback of 2-meters from the property line. “If (the building) is not demolished, I cam certain that the DCK will not be bold enough to issue a building permit (IMB). If the neighbor isn’t prepared to grant an easement, then it means the building must be demolished. Give a distance of 2 meters space from the land of the adjoining property,” admonished Giri Prasta.

Meanwhile, the head of the Zoning Agency (DCK), Dessy Dharmayanti, told the press that the hotel’s owner has confirmed his willingness to demolish the construction on the southern border of the property to conform to the 2-meter rule. That the demolishment has not yet taken place, is due to the fact that retainer walls must first be built to protect the remainder of the building.

The front of the hotel, which has also been built flush with the property’s fence, remains unfinished. According to the property’s owner, Yan Gunawan, the hotel’s construction on its eastern border that is also flush to the property line is not at issue due to an easement granted by the neighbor owning the parcel immediately to the east.

Gunawan claims a similar easement on the northern border has been granted by an owner, named Inge. Inge is reportedly selling her villa with the new hotel’s construction said to abut directly with her villa’s property line

According to Radar Bali, the hotel has other problems yet to be addressed. A check directly at the project site confirmed the construction does not conform to the technical drawings submitted for the IMB application. When Yan Gunawan was asked to show the technical drawings, the visitors noted the provision for a small path measuring 2.2 meters at the north side of the property. However, when the actual path was measured by the survey team, its width varied between 1.3-1.5 meters. Gunawan only confirmed a width of 1.5 meter when confronted with the inconsistency by the visiting legislators.

Also at dispute is the coefficient or open space to realized construction ratio of the building. Zoning laws stipulate that the hotel project must have at least 60% of the land used by the project must remain open gardens. 

Prasta told the press that the DCK will not issue an IMB if the building violates the rules. “I hope that investors who want to enter Badung organize their permits beforehand. This is needed to avoid occurrences like this. The investor suffers if the illegal structure must be demolished,” he explained.

Representing the owners, Yan Gunawan, said he was prepared to demolish the illegal components of the building in the coming few days. He also said he was unaware of the 2-meter set back rule.

Related Article

[Fait Accompli or Faux Pas]
 


Dance Offered to the Gods
South Indian Classical Dance: Bharata Natyam Performed by Malvika Sarukkai Ė One Night Only, Wednesday, March 21, 2012.

Bali will enjoy rare opportunity to see the internationally acclaimed Malavika Sarukkai perform the South Indian Classical dance form of Bharata Natyam on Wednesday, March 21, 2012, at 7 pm at Geoks Stage in Singapadu, Gianyar in a free concert co-sponsored by the Indian Cultural Center, Bali in cooperation with Geoks Stage.

Bharata Natyam dates from 1,000 BCE. Performed solo, conventionally by women, it is in its essence a dance of dedication intended as an offering to the Gods. 
Consisting of both pure dance via clear-cut movements and sculpturesque poses, it is also an expressive celebration presented in accompaniment of songs. Those songs are typically about love, and a longing to become one with the Ultimate.
kkai’s appearance in Bali will be supported by five superb musicians:
  • Ms. Nandini Anand - Singer
  • Ms. S. Srilatha - Ensemble (Nattuvangam)
  • Mr. Nellai A. Balaji - Mridangam - percussion
  • Mr. Sai Shravanam - Tabla
  • Ms. Srilakshmi Venkataramani - Violin
Intense, extraordinary and luminous are terms used to describe the qualities that distinguish Malavika Sarukkai’s dancing. With her obvious artistic mastery and technique, she commands a presence on the world dance stage. She is acclaimed globally for her creative dance choreographies, which transport the viewer to the very heartbeat of dance, transporting the dancer and the audience beyond any specific geographies.

As a passionate and innovative trailblazing dancer from India, her collaborative productions have synergized dialogues with artists from different media – poets, musicians, painters, sculptors and contemporary writers. These interactions bring to her choreographic interpretations the incandescent beauty of the classical language and the energized articulation of a contemporary mind. As an artist and activist, with imagination and sensitivity, she draws inspiration from the world. Making her dance inseparable from life – recreating in her dance the vibrancy and beauty of nature; the joy and the despair of the human condition and the seeking of the spiritual.

Refined sensibilities and fine body intelligence have seen her emergence as a brilliant choreographer in Bharata Natyam, inventing a deeply compelling style of her own. She later consolidated this through a series of spellbinding and spiritually infused thematic performances. In doing so, she has contributed a large body of significant work to this solo form pushing the boundaries of the language of classical dance.

At the age of seven, motivated by her mother Saroja Kamakshi, Malavika Sarukkai began her studies in dance. She trained under Guru Kalyanasundaram of the Tanjavur School and Guru Rajaratnam of the Vazhuvoor School. She also studied Abhinaya (expressive dance) with Guru Kalanidhi Narayanan and the Odissi dance style with Guru Kelucharan Mohapatra and Guru Ramani Jena.

Her choreography is striking in that it strips away the decorative and the superficial and instead focuses on the essential. In the process, the dancing moment is imbued with a “living” quality. This exceptional quality champions the dance and not the dancer. Each performance by Malavika Sarukkai leaves the audience with unforgettable impressions of the dance. Moments that stay with them long after the concert is over.

South Indian Classical Dance
Bharata Natyam Performed by Malvika Sarukkai

Wednesday, March 21, 2012 – 7 pm
Geoks Stage – Singapdu, Gianyar
(Just North of the Bali Bird Park)

Admission Free

For more information telephone ++62-(0)81 238 05623

[For Information Email Rucina Ballinger]



Painting@Drawing
Painting and Drawings by 17 Indonesian Artists at Painting@Drawing at Tonyraka Gallery in Ubud, Bali March 30-April 14, 2012

Painting@Drawing - the exhibition at Tonyraka Gallery in Ubud March 30 – April 14, 2012 presents a selection of drawing-based paintings as a way to see an “evolution of drawing” in contemporary art practice.
is seen as an element of painting, but not just one element among others. It is specifically highlighted as the superior element of painting, the main part which determines the character of the painterly subject, or the character of the painter, the expression of thoughts and feelings of the artist: Drawing as the important element which embodies the “style.”

The exhibition seeks to reveal insights about how the contemporary artists create new levels of complexity in the practice of drawing that expands and enriches the traditional drawing practice. It shows an increasing appreciation of drawing in contemporary art, as well as the ways in which drawing continues to evolve, constantly re-creating itself.

Painting@Drawing marks a changing attitude towards drawing in the realm of contemporary art.

Painting@Drawing features the work of the following artists:
  • Agung Mangu Putra
  • Chusin Setiadikara
  • Dewa Ngakan Ardana
  • Diyano Purwadi 
  • Dewa Putu Mokoh 
  • Gusti Ayu Kadek Murniasih 
  • Ida Bagus Putu Purwa 
  • Ketut Teja Astawa
  • Made Mahendra Mangku
  • Made Wiguna Valasara
  • Mimi Fadmi 
  • Nyoman Wijaya 
  • Pius Sigit Kuncoro
  • Putu Wirantawan 
  • T. Cundrawan
  • Wayan Kun Adnyana 
  • Wayan Suja 
Curated by Arif Bagus Prasetya

Painting@Drawing
Friday, March 30 until April 13, 2012
Open Daily 10 am until 5 pm

Tonyraka Art Gallery
Jl. Raya Mas 86
Mas, Ubud, Bali 80571
Indonesia

For further information: ++62-(0)361-7816785
[Email Tonyraka Art Gallery
[www.tonyrakaartgallery.com
 


Itís About Time
Indonesia Weighing Introduction of a Nationwide Single Time Zone

The national government has ordered all branches to simulate a change from three time zones to a single nationwide time zone. Promoted as an efficiency move, the government is targeting August 17, 2012, as the date for the introduction of the single time zone concept.
identially chaired Indonesian Economic Committee (KP3EI) is driving the change. Quoted in The Jakarta Globe, a spokesman for KP3EI, Ebid Muslim said, “The decision to change the time zones will only need a presidential decision and does not need approval from the House of Representatives.”

The proposal being prepared for implementation would see all parts of Indonesia, now divided over three time zones, unite into to a single time zone of Universal Time Coordinated +8 (UTC+8/GMT+8). This would see western Indonesia jump forward one hour from UTC+7 and eastern Indonesia (UTC+9) set their clocks back by one hour. Bali would experience no change if the new time-zone plan were implemented.

Indonesia, equal in breadth to the Continental U.S.A which has 4 time zones, stretches east to west over a distance roughly equal to one-quarter of the world’s circumference.

During WWII the Japanese occupying forces established a single time zone of UTC+9 to put Indonesia on the same time zone with Japan. Dutch colonial rulers, however, divided Indonesia into six separate time zones in gradations of 30 minutes.

The national government insists that a single time zone would bring significant economic benefit to the country by promoting productivity and efficiency.

Shown on Balidiscovery.com is a simulation for Saturday, March 17, 2012, showing the changes in sunrise and sunset times on that date in three different Indonesia locations under the current three time zone system and under a single time zone.


Baliís Village of the Deaf
Article by Aubrey Belford in theglobalmail.org Offers Interesting Insights into Balinese Village of Bangkala Ė Home to a Unique Population of Deaf Residents

Theglobalmail.org - an excellent philanthropically funded, not-for-profit news and feature website has published a captivating article by Aubrey Belford on Bengkala Village, located on the northern slopes of Mount Batur in Bali.

Bengkala is a village of 2,700 people where 44 of the resident are congenitally deaf. A higher-than-normal rate of people suffering from hearing loss has been recorded in the community for eight generations, growing over time, it is believed, due to close intermarriage between those genetically inclided to the condition.

The village has been the subject of extensive study by academics interested in the unique local sign language of kata kolok that has evolved in the Bengkala and the equally unique social structure of a village where Balinese dance forms for the deaf have evolved and where young deaf men, trained rigorously in martial arts, find employment as pacalang or local security guards.

Great reading including interesting video clips at [Bali’s Village of the Deaf]


Indonesia and Bali Score Awards at ITB-Berlin
Indonesia Named Third best Destination in Asia While Bali Pavilion Named Among the Best at ITB-Berlin

The National News Agency Antara has confirmed that Bali was named as one of the best participants at the International Tourism Bourse (ITB) held in Berlin March 7-11, 2012.

According to Ida Bagus Ngurah Wijaya, who is chairman of the Bali chapter of Indonesian Tourism Industry Association (GIPI), Bali was named the eighth best exhibitor in the Asia Pavilion at what is inarguably one of the world’s largest travel marts.

Jurgen Weischer, Presient of the Cologne Business School, which conducts the contest each year at ITB, presented the award to Bali.

In making the award, Weischer said: "This is not only because the Balinese pavilion which only measured 55 sq meters looked smaller than those of Malaysia and Thailand which had an area of 2,000 square meter but also because it was crowded by visitors."

The Bali pavilion was outranked in the evaluation process after Korea, Japan, Thailand, Malaysia and India.

Indonesia Wins Award at ITB

Indonesian won third prize in the Go Asia Award 2012 Award announced at ITB.

The Go Asia Award recognizes best tourism destinations in Asia. Winning first in the competition was Thailand, with Singapore coming in second.

Indonesian Minister of Tourism and the Creative Economy, Mari Elka Pangestu, was pleased with the award, saying to Kompas.com: “ITB Berlin is the precise platform to promote Indonesian tourism. We will evaluate and decide the strategy for next year’s promotion based on this achievement.”

Determined to achieve 8 million tourist visitors in 2012, Pangestu said Indonesia would become an official country partner in 2013, adding, “To get optimum results, preparations start from now.”


Dining with the Chefs
Five of Baliís Best Chefs Combine Forces on a Single Night at Metis Restaurant & Gallery, Kerobokan, Bali on March 29, 2012

Five of Bali’s most talented cooking stars will share the kitchen of the Metis Gallery and Restaurant in Kerobokan, Bali on Thursday, March 29, 2012 at an event suitably named “Bali’s Best Chefs.”
ing will feature the culinary skills of:
  • Executive Chef Arief Wicaksono – Metis Restaurant and Gallery
  • Chef Christian Nehemia – Holiday Inn Resort Baruna Bali
  • Ridwan Isbani – The Leguna Resort and Spa
  • Desyanto Nugroho – The Stones Hotel and Entertainment Center
  • Ronald Noverson Tokilov – Bali Cardamom Restaurant
The cost for the special degustation menu awaiting a strictly limited number of diners is Rp. 1,250,000 ++ (US$168).

For more information and menu details [Email Karina] or [Email Mira]  

Telephone ++62-(0)361-4737888


We Get Mail
Emails on Taylor Kitsch, Carrying Capacity, Illegal Villas, ĎDKí License Plates, Unlicensed Guides, Jail for Regency Officials, Zoning Violations, Noise in Kuta, Hotel Development in Canggu & Green Education Efforts in Ubud.

[We'll Huff and We'll Puff and Blow Your House Down] -  our coverage of a call by the vice-regent of Badung to demolish 300 illegal villas in south Bali caused one reader to speculate:
  •  Patrick Butler wrote
"I wonder when other regencies (e.g. Karangasem) in Bali will adopt the 'rule of law' and enforce the law as appears to be happening in Badung. I also wonder when the English language press will expand its perspective to the rest of the island."

[Kitsch as Kitsch Can] - covering the international uproar caused by Hollywood star Taylor Kitsch and his comments on treatment by immigration officers at Bali airport brought a number of letters.
  • Doug Edwards said:
"If Bali immigration officers used a bit of sense then us regular travelers to Bali would have our 10-year passports last at least 7 years before being full with 1-inch visas stamped dead center of the page. Try asking for it to be put to one side and making room for other visas, and the reply is ‘how much you pay’! If you want to really want to know what goes on at the airport, ask an expat."
  • Geoff L had this to say:
"‘Meanwhile, immigration officials are insisting that their man, identified only by the initials RE, was guilty of little more than a miscommunication with the young actor.’"

"Given the track record of Immigration Officials at Bali's International Airport, and their love for bribery, are we really supposed to swallow this ‘miscommunication’ excuse? Clean the place out and stop the practice of corruption at the Airport."


[Bali: A Victim of its Own Success] - an article quoting the PHRI chairman and Gianyar regent, ‘Cok Ace’ questioning the sustainability of Bali’s current commitment to mass tourism earned many letters.
  • Tina Roma said:
“Very sad. But it's too late, I think. We went over that line a while ago. Let's see how long 'mother nature' can put up with it all. I think she'll be angry eventually and it's scary to think about the end result when she shows us her anger!”
  • A reader identifying himself as Johnny Cool wrote:
“Tjokorda's 'marketing' mentality is difficult to understand. Who knows what the ‘actual carrying capacity of the island’ is?”

“Bali's population (3.9 million) is already approaching three times the ‘ideal’ number (about 1.5 million), according to local academic experts. That's not counting tourists, whether foreign or domestic.”

“Part of Bali's continuing degradation can be attributed directly to PHRI-Bali, of which Tjokorda is the current chairman as well as being the Regent of Gianyar, and others like him.”

“How he could control the "quality" of tourists coming to Bali is beyond me.”

“The rapid marginalization of traditional values in Bali has many sources. For example, young Balinese plugged in to social networking through their cell phones. Young Balinese who don't want to speak Bahasa Bali because it's not "cool."

“Ubud has turned into a mini-urban nightmare. Who let that happen? Places like Tanah Lot are like a Hindu theme-park these days.”

“The 'blame' for all this cannot be solely aimed at 'tourists.' Greed, corruption and indifference are more likely candidates.”


[They've Got Your Number]  reporting on the crackdown on “Non-DK” licenses plates operating in Bali, prompted a wise observation from one reader in Sanur.
  • Philip in Sanur wrote:
“Indonesian law requires that one may only register a vehicle in the place of residence, as per the address on the KTP. So if a Jakarta resident has a second home in Bali and wishes to leave a vehicle in Bali, by national law, he/she cannot register a vehicle in Bali.”

“So how does Bali Province seek to legally apply such a regulation to owners of vehicles with a non-Bali KTP?”

“National law clearly prevails over Provincial regulations.”


[Misguided in Bali] which reported the anger of the governor over illegal guides in Bali and his demand for their imprisonment brought a letter:
  • Donna wrote to say
“I have been hearing about the problems with unlicensed tour guides for some time. But what is not clear to me is exactly which type the Governor is referring to. For example, does he mean the thugs who demand that visitors use them even for short visits to Besakih and charge outrageous rates? Or does he mean the freelance drivers who take tourists on informal tours around the island and also give some information and describe points of interest? The first is clearly a blot on Bali and the reputation of its people. The second is, in my opinion, a way to employ thousands of hard-working people and bridges the gap between taking tour busses and having to figure out Bali's attractions by yourself and on your own steam.' 

[Go Directly to Jail]  outlining the conundrum caused by the 2009 Zoning Law and the possibility of prison terms for regency officials brought a letter from Ubud.
  • Garrett Kam in Ubud wrote:
“I say convert all those illegal villas and hotels into prisons for the people who built them without permission. Plus the facts that the owners of villas near the Kerobokon prison have complained about having the facility so nearby. Well, serves you right. The prison was there long before the villas. So don't complain and just be good neighbors with your fellow prisoners!"

[It All Comes Out in the End] detailing the potentially macabre fate awaiting an Australian man who tried to smuggle commercial quantities of drug into Bali inside his gut brought a spirited response:
  • Bill Gossett wrote:
“Let's hope that there is no 'plea bargaining' and that he receives the death penalty! He faces death for $150K US of crap... Those drugs would have destroyed hundreds of lives on Bali!! Indonesia has great drug laws and they need to stand by them or run the risk of losing credibility.”

[Fait Accompli or Faux Pas]  on reports of possible zoning and building violations by The Alaia Echo Beach Hotel in Canggu also brought letters:
  • Steve Bradley wrote:
“What a joke Bali has become in the regard to building codes, if it actually has any. Most properly run governments have rules and regulations that the populace are expected to follow and if they don't penalties apply. Not so in Bali which seems to be more in the ‘Wild West’ of the 19th Century. If you have money you can do what you like without fear of retribution. There is a hotel in the heart of Kuta that was meant to be prevented from continued building, prevented from being opened, prevented from continued trading and threatened with demolition and is still trading! A joke!"

[In the Still of the Night]  part of our continuing coverage of efforts to enforce closing times at Kuta nightspots also elicited letters:
  • Anand Kirshna said:
“We have been bearing with this kind of nuisance for the past 6 years. When we complained to the owner of the cafe, he got wild and said that it was a matter of ‘life and death’ for him. He made his living from the cafe (which was not true, anyway, since everybody in the vicinity knows that he has several other sources of income). He even threatened us instead and mentioned someone's name as his ‘backing.’ "

“My doctor friend tells me that each and every organ in our body as its resting hours, and from 11 pm to around 1.00 am is the sleep time for liver.”

“There has to be a better and wiser decision in this matter. If they want to remain open until 2 am, then they must have sound proofing so as not to risk others health.”


[Waste Not Want Not]  detailing efforts to educate Ubud school children on the need to live a green lifestyle, earned some enthusiastic support:
  • Helen wrote:
“Well done. This should be made to be done in all schools around Bali. Education about waste is long overdue, you have to get into this ‘Century’ and think seriously about the future of this world.”
 


You Take the High Road
Hiking in Bali 20 Hikes in Amed: Bali's remote Northeast Coast Ė the Latest Bali Exploration Book by Lash

American nomad of the electronic era, a lady who calls herself “Lash,” continues to explore Asia while writing books in support of her freewheeling lifestyle. In love with the open road and open air, she hikes, climbs, cycles, dives and snorkels her way around Asia and Bali in a journey she first commenced in 1998.

Lash started wilderness hiking at a young age with her family in the U.S.A.. As a young adult she took up more extensive wilderness adventures by backpacking in American's national and state parks. Later, she took her hiking enthusiasm to Japan, where she lived from 1991-1997, and hiked Japan's mountains and countryside.

Visiting Bali for the first time in 2000, she climbed all of Bali's main peaks and cycled around the eastern half of the island. She has returned to Bali almost annually ever since, staying 2-6 months each time.

Since 2007,  Lash has spent three 4-month stints in Amed, north Bali, where she hiked extensively, and gathering notes for her latest guidebook on hiking in Bali.

A diving Instructor and emergency first response Instructor, she has spent most of the past 14 years living in the tropics.

She also runs a popular travel blog site featuring stories, photo galleries, travel tips and advice.

Hiking in Bali

Lash’s latest book Hiking in Bali 20 Hikes in Amed: Bali's Remote Northeast Coast is arguably the first book of its kind, surveying walks of varying difficulty in and around the picturesque area of northeast Bali.

The Hiking Guide follows Lash's earlier popularly acclaimed guide to cycling tours of Bali.

Tucked in Bali's remote northeast corner, Amed sits in a mountainous coastal region of tiny fishing villages set in crescent bays that are separated by rocky headlands and backed by pretty mountains whose ridge lines dip their toes into the gentle Bali Sea. Local farmers and fisherman inhabit Amed’s little-visited mountains. Hidden in the hillsides are their thatch and stone houses, terraced fields, Hindu temples, and secret watering holes. From the ridgelines, spectacular views of Bali's north coast await visitors.

Hiking in Bali guides adventurers on 20 charming hikes along narrow mountain footpaths, remote roads, grassy headlands and Amed's only long beach.

The guidebook provides all the details needed to enjoy memorable excursions into the author's slice of the 'real Bali'.

Each hike includes:
  • Brief hike description
  • Highlights of the hike
  • Tables of 'fast facts' listing all essentials such as distance, hiking time, start/end points, and difficulty
  • Detailed step-by-step instructions
  • A map
  • Photos
  • Amenities/facilities available in each hike area
Hiking in Bali also includes helpful hints on how stay healthy during a Bali holiday.

Hiking in Bali 20 Hikes in Amed: Bali's remote Northeast Coast
ISBN/EAN13: 1463668147 / 9781463668143
184 pages

Related Sites

[Order from LashWorldTour.com

[Order on Amazon]

[Seeing Bali on Two Wheels]
 


Calculating the Losses
Estimated 13 Deaths and More than US$200,000 in Damages Blamed on Week of Ferocious Storms in Bali

Unusually violent weather in Bali between Tuesday, March 14 and Saturday March 17, 2012, is blamed for at least 11 deaths. The bad weather in Bali is linked to the Cyclone Lua weather system over northern Australia.

The death and destruction brought to Bali by this storm system has swept across a number of regencies and municipal areas of the island, leaving a confirmed 11 people dead and two still missing  over a 5-day period.

Material damages caused by the series of storms that brought flooding, landslide and high winds have been estimated at Rp. 1.9 billion (US$211,000).

According to Kompas.com, data from the Disaster Mitigation Agency (Pusdalops) there were five deaths attributed to landslides in the Bangli regency near Kintamani; three killed by falling trees and buildings in Gianyar regency; two killed in Karangasem by falling trees; and another death under a fallen tree in Buleleng. The death toll of 11 does not include 2 more people missing following landslides in Kintamani on Tuesday night and still being sought by search and rescue workers.

Meanwhile, in Bali’s capital of Denpasar four people were injured and taken to local hospitals after being hit by falling trees on Saturday, March 17, 2012.

According to Pusdalops, materials losses caused by the bad weather are comprised of losses of Rp. 894,500,000 (US$99,400) in Tabanan regency where home, religious temples and a hotel suffered damage. Damages in Badung regency are put at Rp. 587,000,000 (US$65,200); Karangasem regency at Rp. 278,000,000 (US$30,900); Klungkung regency Rp. 135,000,000 (US$15,000) and Denpasar Rp. 75,000,000 (US$8.300).

Pusdalops is now working with regency governments in Bali to channel aid to those who suffered losses during the recent storms.

Related Article

[Bad Weather Claims Lives in Kintamani]
 


The Terror Stops Here
Elite Densus 88 Anti-Terror Squad Kills 5 Men in Bali Raids

A detachment of Indonesia’s elite Densus “88” Anti-Terrorist Squad from the national police headquarters have shot dead five men in two separate raids in Sanur and nearby Denpasar in the early evening hours of Sunday night, March 18, 2012.

According to the National News Agency Antara, a police spokesman in Jakarta has confirmed the two raids took place at the Laksmi Bungalow on Jalan Danau Poso 88 in Sanur and a second location on Jalan Gunung Soputan in downtown Denpasar. The spokesman told the press that the men who were shot were sought by police in connection with the robbery of a CIMB Bank branch in Medan.

The men shot by police hail from Bandung (West Java), Makassar (South Sulawesi) and Jimbaran (Bali).

The police raid in Sanur occurred at the commercial bungalow located in a densely populated area on Jalan Danau Poso Sanur where three men were shot in a gun battle with police. Meanwhile, the police shot the two men on the same evening on Jalan Gunung Soputan at a location not far from the New Star Café. In the Denpasar gunfight, police were reportedly involved in a brief chase and gunfight with four men, with two managing to escape on motorcycles.

Police claim the five men shot in the two separate locations were member of a single terrorist cell. The men are said by police to have been in Bali since February.

Prior to the gun battle, the men were under surveillance by police. Police say the group had surveyed a gold store in Uluwatu, a money changing office and a Café. Police believe the men were preparing to rob these locations.

Police confiscated two FN make pistols, two magazines of ammunition, 48- 9 mm caliber bullets and facemasks.


 
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Bali Update #693
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Bali Update #692
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Bali Update #682
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Bali Update #650
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Bali Update #643
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Bali Update #642
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Bali Update #634
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Bali Update #625
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Bali Update #612
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Bali Update #609
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Bali Update #607
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Bali Update #605
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Bali Update #604
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Bali Update #603
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Bali Update #602
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Bali Update #600
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Bali Update #599
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Bali Update #598
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Bali Update #597
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Bali Update #596
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Bali Update #595
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Bali Update #594
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Bali Update #593
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Bali Update #591
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Bali Update #590
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Bali Update #589
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Bali Update #555
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Bali Update #553
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