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Bali News by Bali Update
BALI UPDATE #954 - 15 December 2014

IN THIS UPDATE


Youíll Have a Yabba Dabba Doo Time
Baliís Prehistoric Man Museum Near Gilimanuk Suffers from Primitive Neglect by Both Government and the Public

Beritabali.com reports that the Prehistoric Man Museum (Museum Manusia Purbakala) in Asri, near Gilimanuk, West Bali, remains bereft of visitors, despite the high historical value of its collection.

Data collected for visitors to the Museum since the beginning of 2012 show that those passing through its doors have overwhelmingly been comprised of students. Visitors coming from the general public are exceedingly rare, with only 13 such visitors during the first quarter of 2012, three of whom were foreign visitors conducting research in March. The remaining 10 gneral public visitors were domestic tourist who stopped, had a brief look and left.

The 169 student visitors to the Prehistoric Man Museum ranged from grade school pupils to High School students.

In truth, the condition of the museum in general is poor. The exhibit rooms have little in the way of equipment and displays. Moreover, the museum has no facilities for its staff, many who hail from other areas. As a result, many employees of the museum sleep on straw mats within the museum premises each night.

Outside, the museums large grounds are also in a sad state. Rubbish is strewn around and grass is growing tall in the absence of a groundskeeper. In all, only five people are entrusted with the case of the museum.

The Museum’s Coordinator, I Gede Bagus Ketut Ari Susila, freely admits the unhappy state of the Prehistoric Man Museum in West Bali. He shared that since the museum's inauguration in 1994, the condition of the facility has been much the same. There are few visitors, except during mid-semesters or end-semester when school children come to visit.

“They come on the reconnection of the Regency. The visitors range from kindergarten to high school students. If there are school camping expeditions, then the are always urged to visit to here,” explained Ari.

Arie continued, explaining that there are few foreign visitors who come to the museum. The foreign tourists who do come to visit are usually involved in some sort of research. The rest of the general public visiting the museum merely stop for a moment before quickly continuing on.

The museum’s director admitted that the location of his facility is hidden and off the main tourist track. He also said there was little promotion of the museum via the Internet, as the museum has no computer. Adding insult to injury, the museum lacks so much as a brochure to promote its existence to the public.


Paved Paradise, and Put up a Parking Lot
Hotel and Restaurant Association Official Call on Bali to Be More Selective in Granting Investment Licenses to New Hotels

The Bali Chapter of the Indonesian Hotel and Restaurant Association (PHRI-Bali) is calling on the provincial government of Bali to be more selective in receiving new investments in the hotel sector. In making the call, PHRI wants the island’s administrators to carefully consider that Bali is, in fact, a small island with limited carrying capacity before allowing new developments.

As reported by Beritabali.com, the vice-secretary-general of the national PHRI, Carla Parengkuan, said that any agreement to add more hotels in Bali should first look at current average occupancy rates, and only give permits for new hotels when average occupancy is above 70%.

Parengkuan said that the reality of the current situation is that average hotel occupancies are below 60%.

She also underlined that decisions to allow new hotels in Bali must also reference the capacity of flights landing at Bali’s sole airport.

Said Parengkuan: “Let’s not slowly finish it all. There are many rooms and the capacity of the airplanes is inadequate. In the end everything will be bad. There needs to be a shared perception of the problem between the provincial government and the travel industry so that future investors achieve results in accordance with their expectations.”

To this end, Carla Parengkuan said she hoped the provincial government of Bali would tighten its investment rules on new hotels.

Based on data provided by PHRI-Bali, Bali now has 62,400 hotel rooms of which the Bali Tourism Service estimates only 45,000 (72%) are legally licensed.


Around the World on Two Wheels
French Quartet of Bicyclists Visit Bali on Round-the-World Journey

Radar Bali shares how the obsession of four French citizens to circle the globe by bicycle is nearing realization. The French quartet of cyclists has traveled across the American and European continents and is now traversing Asia, including the island of Bali.
: Brian Berger (27). Romain Nicolino (26), Alex Laine (24) and Robin Rietton (25) were recently encountered in the parking area of the Rambut Siwi Temple, one of the largest Hindu Temples in Bali, located in the western regency of Negara.

The group, who had pitched their tents in the Temple’s parking lot, had started their world-circling journey in September of 2011. As explained by Brian Berger, a former fireman and a member of the tour: “In addition to cycling, which is our hobby, we undertook this journey because of our desire to see the world and to surf the world’s beaches. Because of this, we always bring our boards for surfing.”

Nicolino added how the group had traversed Europe and America before coming to Bali, adding, “we visited the ancient sites of the Incas and Machu Picchu in Peru.”

The four, who hail from Chamonix-Mont-Blanc in France, have been friends since school days. Each gave up their respective careers in order to pursue their dream of travel.

Laine contributed that the route thus far has brought them from their native France to Spain and on to Portugal. From Portugal they flew by plane to Brazil in South America. Landing in Brazil, they traveled on to Peru, Bolivia and Chile. From Chile they flew to Jakarta from where they have traveled overland to Bali in the space of only one week. Laine told of how the group had purposely chosen Bali as a destination because of its reputation for natural beauty.

After Bali the group plans to visit Malaysia, Thailand, Myanmar and Turkey. Tentative plans have them back home in France in September of 2012.

Related Article

[Seeing Bali on Two Wheels]


Fool on the Hill
Whatís Happening with Stalled Panorama Hotel Project Overlooking GWK Park in Bali?

Radar Bali reports that among the numerous hotel projects in Bali there are a number of half-completed projects prompting public demands for their completion.

Included among those projects are the Panorama Hotel in the village of Ungasan, on a hilltop overlooking the Garuda Wisnu Kencana Monument (GWK) Park. Now an uncompleted eyesore, the five-storey hilltop structure has been abandoned for years.

A local community leader in Ungasan, Made Duama, said, “The people of Ungasan have questions and are urging the completion of the Panorama Hotel.”

Duama, who served a village leader when the hotel project was commenced, says the Badung regency government should show firm resolve and revoke the licenses of the hotel is the accommodation project is indeed abandoned.

The head of the Zoning Authority for Badung (Dinas Cipta Karya –DCK), Ni Putu Dessy Dharmayanty, acknowledges the presence of the uncompleted hotel, claiming she has issued warnings to the investors to complete the hotel. “According to the rules, after five years any project that is not completed results in an automatic suspension of its building permit,” she explained.

Dessy confirmed that the building permit (IMB) was granted to the hotel in 2008, meaning the project’s permits expire in 2013.


Rising in the Ranks at Westin
Westin Resort Nusa Dua Broadens Responsibilities of Bipan Kapur and Jason Leung

Sheraton Bali Kuta Resort and The Westin Resort Nusa Dua, Bali have announced the promotion of Bipan Kapur to Managing Director for both resorts.
ointment means Kapur is now overseeing the soon-to-be-opened, Sheraton Bali Kuta Resort,in addition to his existing responsibilities as General Manager Westin Resort Nusa Dua Bali and Bali’s largest conference facility - the Bali International Convention Centre.

“It has been a wonderful four years since I joined The Westin Resort Nusa Dua, Bali and now I look forward to the additional responsibilities of the Sheraton Bali Kuta Resort,” commented Kapur.

Bipan has been with Starwood since 1992 starting his career at Sheraton Mirage Gold Coast in 1992. Over the intervening two decades he has worked in various capacities in India, the Middle East, Australia, China, Malaysia and Brunei.

An Australian national, Bipan is married and has a Son who studies in Australia.

Jason Leung Appointed Executive Assistant Manager
in Resort Nusa Dua have also announced the promotion of Jason Leung to the role of Executive Assistant Manager, effective April 1, 2012.

A respected Sales & Marketing professional, Jason has held senior roles at in Australia before coming to Bali. He joined Starwood six years ago working at Four Points by Darling Harbor, Australia’s largest Hotel. His promotion means that in addition to his ongoing sales and marketing role, he will assume responsibility for the daily operations of the resort and the adjacent Bali International Convention Center.

Leung first arrived in Bali 3 years ago to lead the Sales & Marketing Department for the Westin Resort Nusa Dua and the Bali International Convention Center.

Jason is married and has two sons.


Long White Clouds on Garudaís Horizon
Garuda Indonesia Prepares to Resume Daily Flights to Auckland, New Zealand

Garuda Indonesia has signed a memorandum of understanding (MOU) with Auckland Airport in New Zealand declaring the Indonesian air carriers intention to commence flight to New Zealand in 2013.

Garuda suspended its Auckland services in 2006.

Seen as past of an overall expansion of flight services in the Asia-Pacific, Garuda signed the MOU during British Prime Minister David Cameron’s visit to Indonesia and in the presence of New Zealand Prime Minister, John Key, during the latter’s three-day visit to the Republic.

Garuda’s CEO Emirsyah Satar signed the agreement on behalf of the airline while Joan Withers, chairman of the Auckland Airport Authority representing New Zealand interests.

Quoted by Jakarta Globe, Emirsyah said after the signing: 

“In line with the growing market between two countries, Garuda is seeking the opportunity to resume flights to Auckland as part of plan to increase its network, especially from New Zealand to cities in Asia and to Europe via Jakarta and Bali.”

Emirsyah said travelers could expect the service to New Zealand to come on line in early 2013 with a daily flight utilizing a newly purchased Airbus A330 aircraft.

[Fly New Zealand to Bali with Virgin Australia]


Keeping the Kitchen Competitive
Unilver Food Solutions Selects Four Bali Chefs for ĎChef of the Yearí Finals

After separate selection processes in Jakarta, Bandung and Surabaya – Unilever Food Solutions sponsors of the “Chef of the Year 2012” nation-wide competition conducted the Bali selections at the Nusa Dua Tourism Institute (STP) on Monday, April 16, 2012.

The Bali round of competition saw 20 talented young cooks advance to the semifinals stage, spread evenly across two divisions: Senior and Junior Chefs. A panel of culinary experts served as jury, comprised of Chef Made Putra from the Bali Culinary Professions (BCP), Chef Henry Bloem from the Indonesian Chef Association (ICA), Chef M. Nur Nasution from SPT Bali and Chef Widhi Joestiarto the executive chef from Unilever Food Solutions.

After a careful review of the 20 entries the field was narrowed to the best six Bali chefs from among which four were selected to represent Bali in the grand final competition scheduled for Jakarta in late April. There the four Bali finalists will compete against the corresponding semi-final winners from Jakarta, Bandung and Surabaya.

The Bali winners from the Senior Chef Division are:
  • Anak Agung Gede Taskara Magara from the Conrad Bali Report and Spa
  • I Ketut Gunatika from St. Regis Bali

Meanwhile, the winners from the Junior Chef Division are:
  • Dias Raditya Wijaya from the Bulgari Hotel
  • Ida Bagus Gde Ananta Putra from the Banyan Tree Ungasan

Unilever’s Executive Chef Widhi Joestiarto explained that before the four were selected for the Jakarta Grand Finals they were first required to pass through a series of qualifying rounds. Initially, participants were asked to send a main course recipe using at least two Unilever products as ingredients. Later, following an initial selection process, the remaining participants have to submit an additional recipe using Unilever products that had to be prepared within a 60-minute time period.

Unilever have announced their intention to make their “Chef of the Year” competition an annual event.


Art with Shared Indian and Balinese Roots
I Ketut Suwidiarta Exhibition of Paintings at Danes Art Veranda, Denpasar, Bali May 11-25, 2012

Few artists, including those hailing from Bali, are interested in undertaking an academic study of a foreign culture and its artistic traditions. I Ketut Suwidiarta, born in the village of Bongkasa, Bali in 1976, completed his tertiary education at ISI Yogyakarta before choosing to continue his studies at the Faculty of Visual Arts Rabindra Bharati University at Victoria Memorial Hall in Kolkata, India from 2008-2010.
After completing his course of study in the country which is the birthplace of the Mahabrata and Ramayana epics he participated in several exhibitions and artistic events in Kolkata, India.

Returning home to Bali from India, Suwidiarta continues to exhibit his works – much inspired by his Indian sojourn.

His latest exhibition “Ziarah Rupa” will run from May 11 to May 25, 2012 at the Danes Art Veranda, Jalan Hayam Wuruk No. 159 in Denpasar.

Putu Wirata Dwikora, an art lover and the curator of the exhibition, says that generally the style and artistic vision of Suwidiarta is a form of parody, laughter and insinuation. Suwidiarta’s work uses a whole range of themes, beginning from societal problems of daily life, political issues and cultural dilemnas that can be both dynamic and sources of conflict. This Balinese artists has rendered an essence derived from his Indian journey and now incorporated into the social and artistic reality of Bali.

Suwidiarta contends that the art and culture he discovered in India was bountiful and too wide-ranging to be ignored. His art is now inspired by touches of India and an underlying undestanding that his own Bali-Hindu values trace their roots back to India and now exists with rich overlays of Balinese creativity.

Suwidiarta’s resort to parody is seen in his work “Cinta Dunia” (Love of the World). This painting weds an episode from the Mahabrata epice with the fate of Bali as represented by the Balinese woman Ni Polok, the “muse” of the famous Belgian artist Adrianne le Mayeur de Merpress who once made their home on Bali’s Sanur beach.

“Cinta Dunia” portrays the fate of the island of Bali which has, to his mind, been endlessly exploited for the past 50 years. Bali is shown as Ni Polok who is laid naked by exploitive investors, corrupt leaders and short-sighted community leaders – all joining forces to deprive Bali of her assets in the name of profit.

"Zairah Rupa"

An Exhibition by I Ketut Suwidiarta
May 11 – May 25, 2012
Danes Art Veranda
Jalan Hayam Wuruk No. 159
Denpasar


Singing the Bali Blues
Bali Health Officials Say Bali Residents Suffer from Mental Depression

An estimated 20% of Bali’s 3.9 million residents are believed to suffer from mental depression.

As reported by Beritabali.com, proof of the high rates of mental depression among people living in Bali is demonstrated by the increasingly frequent incidents of social unrest among different groups in Bali and the rising rate of narcotics use.

The director of the Bangli Psychiatric Hospital (RSJ), Dr. Made Sugiharta Yasa, on April 17, 2012, cited the growing popularity of visits to local entertainment venues, such as cafes fronting for prostitution, as indications of depression becoming rampant among the Balinese.

He also cited the high level of consumption of "energy drinks" as further proof of societal mass depression. “A couple of energy drinks are selling very well. This shows that people are depressed. The symptoms of light depression are weakness, no energy and no motivation. By drinking energy drinks these people find spirit,” Dr Yasa explained.

Dr. Yasa added that the level of depression most frequently encountered among the general public is the growing state of widespread anxiety and worry. As a result, many Balinese are trying to overcome their anxiety by consuming alcoholic beverages.


Life, Unhappily Ever After
Bali Prosecutors Demand Life Imprisonment for Those Caught with Commercial Quantities of Narcotics

Another person convicted of trying to smuggle drugs via Bali’s Ngurah Rai Airport is now facing the prospect of life in prison

A 36-year-old teacher from Malang, East Java, Theresia Avilla Yanti Siwi, recently heard prosecutors demand life imprisonment for trying to smuggle 3.755 kilograms of methamphetamines into Bali. This was followed by a similar life sentence demand on April 17, 2012, for Greek Nikolaos Bouikidis, also 36 years, who tried to bring 4 kilogram of methamphetamines into Bali via the airport.

Prosecutors told the court that Bouikidis, who works as a bus driver in his native Greece, was shown to have deliberately and purposely tried to bring methamphetamines weighing nearly 4 kilograms into Indonesia via Bali’s airport. The amount of drugs involved and the damage the criminal act to Bali’s reputation, according to State Prosecutors, warranted a life sentence behind bars.

In mitigation, Nikolaos has freely admitted his crime and asked forgiveness from the people of Bali. Prosecutors are also seeking a Rp.10 billion US$1.1 million) fine from the man.

Nikolaos committed his offense on October 3, 2012 after disembarking a Qatar Airways flight from Doha.

Acting as a mule or courier, Nicholaos says be was promised a fee of US$5,000 once he successfully delivered the shipment to a man in Jakarta.

Police are estimating the street value of the methamphetamines at Rp. 10 billion (US$1.1 million).


Mobilizing Baliís Tourists
Baliís Ngurah Rai Airport Prepares Electric Carts to Help Elderly and Disabled Travelers Navigate Under-Construction Air Gateway

The ongoing US$215 million renovation of Bali’s airport has caused inconvenience to passengers who must often walk considerable distance around ongoing construction areas to access parts of the international passenger terminal.

Kompas.com reports that such inconvenience no longer need to be a concern of elderly or invalid passengers following the provision of a fleet of electric carts now available without charge to assist passengers challenged by navigating their way around the active construction site.

At this time, all passengers are compelled to walk about 150 meters between planes and the international terminal and 300 meters between aircraft and the domestic terminal.

Passengers checking in at the final moments for outgoing flights are also sometimes compelled to run to cover the distance to their departing flight.

The public relations managers for the airport development project, Hary Budi Waluyo, said: “We have actually prepared eight electrical carts to bring people to the passenger terminal. The public needs to know about this service.”

Every cart can carry four people. The carts have also been modified to provide space for the carriage of luggage.

Hary said the electrical carts were being prioritized for elderly, sick, children and those checking in late for a flight. Passengers only need to ask for assistance at the point of disembarkation.


Old Blue Eyes is Cut Back
Baliís Blue Eye Karaoke Complex Finally Succumbs to Demands to Demolish Corner of Building Violating Setback Rules

After numerous delays, the new building at the Blue Eyes Karaoke Complex in Sanur was partially demolished on April 17, 2012, in an effort to bring the building into compliance with zoning rules. The demolishment of those parts of the building not in conformance with mandatory setback distances from a major road will be completed by Sunday, April 22, 2012.

40 workmen were engages in the demolishment.

Rudi Iskandar, the owner of the establishment, told the press that he was demolishing 3 meters of the lower part of the erring structure and 4.5 meters on the upper areas.

Iskandar said five rooms would be sacrificed in the effort to follow zoning laws as and make the building approved drawings match the actual building. He also promised that the finished building would contain Balinese architectural finishes.

Local zoning officials from Denpasar promised they would re-inspect the building following the demolishment to ensure zoning laws are being followed.

Related Articles

[No Permission Necessary]

[In the Eyes of the Law]

[Make My Day]

[Old Blue Eyes is Back]


Making a Sacred Point
Baliís Neka Art Museum in Ubud Expands Collection to Include Sacred Keris Collection

The Neka Arts Museum in Ubud has added 55 rare keris or traditional daggers to their collection. The new daggers, acquired during 2011, brings the total keris collectionof the Museum to 212 complementing the 312 valuable paintings and wood carvings housed at the Museum.

Quoted by Kompas.com, Pande Wayan Suteja Neka, the founder of the Neka Museum said the keris collections is comprised of daggers that are centuries-old, painstakingly collected across the entire Indonesian archipelago.

Included among the keris collection are 21 weapons linked to the ancient Balinese kingdoms of Ki Baju Rantai from the Karangasem Palace and Ki Gajah Petak of the Kanginan Palace in Singaraja.

Pande Neka also noted that the collection of sacred daggers includes “kamardikan” keris made by esteemed craftsmen after Indonesian independence in 1945.

All the daggers will be exhibited to both the many domestic and foreign tourist who visit the popular museum to celebrate its approaching 30th anniversary.

Prior to the acquisition, the daggers were largely held in the sacred collections of royal palaces where they could be seen only once every 420 days during “Tumpek Landep” ceremonies when items made of metal are ritually cleanses and blessed.

UNESCO, the United Nation’s organization concerned with educational and cultural matters, have designated Indonesian Keris as forming part of the world’s heritage of fine artifacts.

The Neka Museum was drawn to establishing their extensive collection of fine traditional daggers because of their sacred qualities and their use in ritual ceremonies, and because of the intrinsic artistic value.


U.S. Super Band to Appear in Bali
Vertical Horizon to Perform in Bali Thursday, May 3, 2012

Vertical Horizon – an alternative rock band formed in Washington, D.C. in 1991 is touring Asia as part of its world tour with stops scheduled in Makassar, Singapore and Bali.
tring of hits stretching across two decades, Vertical Horizon song list includes the memorable “You’re a God,” “Everything You Want,” and “Best I Ever Had (Grey Sky Morning).

In 2009 the group released the album “Burning the Days" and the single “Save Me From Myself.”

Vertical Horizon
consists of band members:
  • Matt Scannell (Lead Vocals & Lead Guitar)
  • Ron LaVella (Drums)
  • Jason Orme (Rhythm Guitar, Backup Vocalist)
  • Cedric LeMoyne (Bass Guitar, Backup Vocalist).

Vertical Horizon will appear at Hard Rock Café Bali on Thursday, May 3, 2012 at 10:00 pm.

Admission is limited and advance tickets are a must at Rp. 350,000 (US$39)

[Tickets]  or directly from Hard Rock Café Bali.


Dealing Drugs Illegally
10% of Baliís Pharmacies Fail to Staff Full Time Pharmacist as Required by Law

A recent survey by the Denpasar’s Health Department officials revealed that 10% of the pharmacies operating in Bali’s capital do not staff a registered full-time pharmacist as required by law.

Denpasar has  218 registered pharmacies.

Beritabali.com quoted the head of medical service at the Denpasar Health Department, Sri Yuniari, as saying that most of the pharmacies found to be operating without the required pharmacist were establishments not owned by pharmacists.

The law clearly stipulates that a pharmacy can only open for business with a pharmacist in attendance at all time. Failure to follow this rule can technically result in the revocation of the pharmacy’s or the pharmacists’ licenses.

Sri Yuniari underlined the importance of having a pharmacist on hand at every drug store in order to be able to answer questions and fully inform customers on the side effects and proper dosage for the drugs dispersed.


Celeste Ieda!
Ieda Puanani In Charge of Event Sales at Nikko Bali Resort and Spa

Nikko Bali Resort and Spa have appointed Ieda Puanani as the director of events sales at the Hotel.

Ieda began her hospitality career as the catering secretary for a five-star hotel in Jakarta, rising after just four years to a managerial position. She has worked with JW Marriott in Jakarta as a director of event management. Other professional positions include employment at the Ritz Carlton Jakarta and in Hawaii.

Prior to joining Nikko Bali Resort and Spa she was in charge of conventions and event at Hotel Indonesia Kempinski Jakarta.

I Ketut Gita will be taking charge of the banquet and events operations as director of events for the Resort.
 


A Celebratory Round is Called For
Baliís Hatten Wines Win Medal as Singapore Wine & Spirit Asia Wine Challenge

The Bali-based winery - Hatten Wines has recently won a silver medal and a bronze medal at Wine & Spirits Asia Wine Challenge in Singapore.
em>2012 Wine & Spirits Asia Wine Challenge in Singapore, Hatten’s dry white wine Aga White claimed a silver medal and Alexandria, the winery’s semi-sweet Muscat,wine won a bronze.

Aga a name meaning “original” in Balinese language secured second place in its dry white category. Alexandria won its latest bronze medal after winning the silver at the Wine for Asia competition in October 2011.

Announced on Wednesday April 18th during the FHA trade show at Singapore Expo, the award ceremony recognized wines from around the world that entered in this 12th edition of the competition.

The Singapore Wine Challenge is a well-established competition in Asia where wine are evaluated by a distinguished panel of judges representing the characteristics of the Asian palate. The previous edition, held in 2010, saw labels from 17 wine-producing countries and regions take part.
This competition adopted a 100-point rating system to allow for simplicity and consistency in the evaluation process, and it is applied to all entries. The rating covers 1) visual aspect of the Wine, 2) aroma and bouquet, 3) flavour and finish, 4) overall expression and quality. For the judging, bottles were coded and bagged, and all capsules and corks were removed. The tasters could only see the code that matched the bag covering the wine tasted. All the wines were blind tasted within their category – the same type of wines are tasted per category and price range.

Defying the popular notion that growing grapes and producing quality wine in the Asian tropics is near impossible, Hatten Wines has managed to establish a successful wine trade while gathering some international recognition. Founded in 1994 by Ida Bagus Rai Budarsa, the first Balinese winery, Hatten Wines has been voted in the top 10 for fastest improving producers in Asia.

Hatten Wines’ range includes a semi-dry Rosé; dry, award-winning Aga White; light Aga Red and an award-winning floral Muscat Alexandria. The range also includes a white and rosé sparkling, Tunjung and Jepun - named after Bali’s water lily and frangipani flowers.

Pineau des Charentes method result in sweet fortified wines Pino de Bali - red or white – that has been aged for 5 years providing a sweet dessert wine for Bali’s tables.
 


An Arak Attack
Bali Legislators Seek Ways to Both Regulate and Encourage Production of Local Alcoholic Spirits

There’s a song by the Indonesian rock music group “Slank” that, roughly translated, goes:

“Thank you dear Bali for your culture and your nature. Thank you for your beautiful girls and the strength of Bali’s arak.”

Arak is the alcoholic beverage often distilled from tuak, a wine made from coconut palms. It can also be distilled from brem - a wine made from glutinous rice and coconut milk.

Celebrated in song, but more celebrated in glasses with friends, arak has a special place in the Balinese culture. As such, Bali lawmakers are now considering how to allocate a special status on both the drinks and their traditional producers.

Unregulated, arak has sometimes been produced by unscrupulous or ill-trained people who have produced a beverage that is poisonous and has cost human lives. A special committee of the Bali House of Representatives (DPRD-Bali) is seeking steps that will both encourage arak production as a local product, while at the same time regulating the production method to ensure public safety is not compromised.

The DPRD-Bali special committee traveled to Sideman, Karangasem on Thursday, April 19, to meet with small-scale producers and hear the aspirations of those who have learned the skill of arak production from generation to generation.

The arak producer told the lawmakers how they wish that their trade could be legally recognized, ending the high cost of having to deal with police. To this end, they asked that a simplified and straightforward licensing method be established for arak producers and a supportive role to be played by the government in the production and marketing of what is a well-known and much enjoyed local product.

Legislators assured local arak producers that the majority of their aspirations are accommodated in new regulations now being drafted by the House.


Beware of Rank Amateurs
Editorial: Wasted Time, Wasted Money and Wasted Opportunities Ė Will Anyone Be Called to Answer for The Tanah Ampo Cruise Terminal Project?

The long-promised International Cruise Terminal at Tanah Ampo in Karangasem, East Bali, originally scheduled for completion in 2010, is a project conceived and built in the most amateurish fashion imaginable.

The original dock was built apparently with little or no consultation with the ship operators or their local port partners it intends to serve.

The actual dock is only 154-meters long, a length far too short to handle the majority of cruise ships that visit to Bali. Moreover, the lamps illuminating the finger pier are standard street lamps, curiously affixed to the very edge of the pier where they are certain to be sheared off by the gunwales and docking lines of the first cruise ship that manages to berth at Tanah Ampo.

A floating pontoon meant to be a transitional platform between ship tenders and the new pier was never marine-worthy and, as a consequence, was smashed to smithereens just weeks after its initial installation. A second, replacement pontoon weathered little better against the strong waves of Bali’s eastern shore. The two pontoons failures have caused the cancellation/diversion of at least one ship visit and seriously disrupted another.

The passenger terminal facility meant to welcome passengers to Bali was designed instead to facilitate local craftsmen’s desire for a lucrative handicraft market. Little reference twas made to the needs and demands of modern cruise ships. The distance walked from the pier ship to bus is both long and circuitous; generally unsuitable for the advanced age of many of cruise passengers.

Parking lots and bus boarding areas have also been badly planned, making its difficult to efficiently embark and disembark passengers leaving on bus tours.

There are also worrysome reports of angry efforts by the community currond the port to block or hinder busses leaving or entering the port.

Obviously, we are not impressed. And by all reports, neither are the cruise operators who are turning their back on Tanah Ampo and heading for the much-improved port of Benoa in south Bali.

The Bupati of Karangasem, Wayan Gredeg, says that he is seeking additional funding of US$27 million to extend the Tanah Ampo pier to 308 meters by 2014 begs questions of how much more must the public pay and how long must they wait while the regency's administrators clumsily connect the dots while trying to decipher out how exactly to serve the cruise industry.

Why inept officials approved such a port, inadequate to the needs of the cruise industry and incapable of fulfilling Bali's cruise ambitions is a question best left to others to ponder. Corruption of funds? Who knows? But, clearly, there was at the very least a basic corruption of purpose committed in the way that Tanah Ampo planners clumsingly went about their job.

And before more good money is thrown after bad, there’s an elephant in the room in the current proposition that screams to be acknowledged. The improvement in Bali’s southern port of Benoa may have already rendered wholly inconsequential any further amateurish forays in maritime construction by Karangasem’s administrators.

Another "end game" concern is the inescapable fact that the Tanah Ampo International Cruise Passenger Terminal will never work without a very substantial expenditure for the construction of a breakwater that would allow ships to berth near the an open seashore regularly pummelled by heavy winds and large waves.

When it comes to Tanah Ampo the Rule of the “6 Ps” applies: Professional Perfect Planning Prevents Poor Performance.

Sadly, in the words of one international cruise ship operator who surveyed Tanah Ampo facility: “When it comes to passenger cruise ports there are two ways of doing things: the ‘right way’ and the ‘Karangasem way.’

Related Articles

[Missing the Boat; Missing the Point]

[Who’s in Charge?]

[Blaming Mother Nature]

[Tanah Ampo: Not Ready for Royalty]

[What’s Up Dock?]

[Bali’s Cruise Ports Found Lacking]

[A Pier without Peer]


Vacancies Filled
Baliís Tourism Graduates Recruited Actively Sought as Employees Both in Indonesia and Abroad

The Nusa Dua Tourism Institute (STP) graduated 436 students on Friday, April 20, 2012.

According to Beritabali.com, 60% of the new graduates have already secured employment positions both at home or abroad.

The chairman of the STP Nusa Dua, I Nyoman Madiun, proudly pointed to the increase in graduates, a 15.3% increase over the number of students who completed their studies in 2011.

Madiun said of the 436 graduates in 2012, 60% already have jobs in tourism companies and hotels, both in Indonesia and abroad. Looking closely at the numbers, he said 32% of STP’s current crop of graduates will be employed abroad, many in the cruise and hotel industry.

Indonesia’s Minister of Tourism and the Creative Economy, Mari Elka Pangestu, in comments to the graduating class read by Deputy-Minister Sapta Nirwandar, said that Indonesian tourism was growing rapidly with 7.6 million foreign visitors nationwide in 2011, an increase of 9.24% over 2010.

Indonesia is targeting 8 million foreign visitors in 2012.


May Day May Prove Expensive
Government Moves to Make Consumers Pay More For Gas When Fueling a Vehicle with an Engine of More than 1,500 cubic Centimeters Starting May 1, 2012

Unable to sustain the massive burden of fuel subsidies, Indonesia is poised to take remedial steps to curb the use of subsidized premium fuel sold at Pertamina filling stations across the nation.

The government has announced its intentions to compel all vehicles with engines of 1,500 cubic centimeters or more to purchase non-subsidized Pertamax fuel sold at a cost of more than twice that of the subsidized premium gas.

The State News Agency Antara, quotes M.S. Hidayat, the Minister of Industry, saying: “The government will restrict subsidized fuel for cars with engines of 1,500 cubic centimeters or more."

This program will begin on May 1, 2012 withdetails announced via various regulations issued by the Ministers of Energy and Natural Resources, Industry and Transportation.

Hidayat confirmed that cars with engines of more than 1,500 cubic centimeters would be required to buy non-subsidized Pertamax fuel.

The heads of everal organizations have called on the government to urgently and completely socialize any change in how gas will be sold and distributed.

Meanwhile, critiques of the government question the viability of the new policy in places like Bali, where only 50% of all gas stations carry non-subsidized Pertamax fuel and question how the government will effectively bar the public from purchasing the cheaper, subsidized premium fuel.


Bali Marathon: Hakuna Matata
Kenyan Runners Predominate Among Winners at BII Maybank Bali International Marathon

Over 2,000 runners from around the world participated in the first BII Maybank Bali Marathon run on the roads of Gianyar on Sunday, April 22, 2012.

The first group of full-marathon runners set off on a 42-km course at 5 pm sharp at the pfficial starting line located at the entrance to the Bali Safari and Marine Park.

Firing the official starting pistol was the regent of the Gianyar regency, Dr. Ir. Tjok Oka A.A. Sukawati. As the runners set off in the darkness a Balinese belaganjur orchestra struck up a chorus of drums and gongs.
d starts were over the ensuing hours for the half-marathon, 10-km run and a special division for wheelchair-bound athletes.

As the runners crossed the finish line they picked up their finishers medals before proceeding deeper inside the park for a morning-long party filled with prize presentations, music from leading musicians and booths run by businesses who played an important supporting role in the first international full-marathon held in Indonesia in over two decades.

Men’s Full-Marathon Winners
unner, Lilan Kennedy Kiprroo won the men’s division in the 42-kilometer division with a time of 2 hours 16 minutes and 54 seconds. Kiproo’s Bali time, bettered by 3 minutes and 13 seconds the winning time he recorded at the KL Marathon in June 2011. The winning time earned Kiproo a paycheck  of US$20,000 handed to him on the winner’s platform by the President Director of BII Dato’ Khairussaleh bin Ramli.

Still in the men’s division, two more Kenyans were the second and third persons to cross the finish line. Luke Kipkemoi Chelimo (2:17:00) and Wilson Chepkwony (2:18:23), each netting prize checks of US$15,000 and US$10,000, respectively.

Women's Full-Marathon Winners
also dominated the winners in the women’s category for the full-marathon. Winfridah Kwamboka and Elizabeth Jeruiyot, both Kenyans, finished with respective times of 2:42:48 and 2:43:35. A Canadian woman, Kari Eliot finished third with a time of 3:07:13.

Like their Male counterparts in the full-marathon, the top female finisher won US$20,000, second place US$15,000 and third place US$10,000.

Top Indonesian Finisher
time in the full-marathon by an Indonesian participant was turned in IG Gede Karangasem who finished the course in only 2:38:39  – a respectable result only 20 minutes off a time recorded by the top three finishers.

Other top Indonesian male finishers were M Ishari (2:51:19) and Novi Gunawan (3:11:33).

Indonesian females runner participating in the full-marathon saw times of 3:07:50 produced by Supriati Sutono, followed by Erni Ulatningsigh (3:11:28) and Novita Andriyani (3:39:44).

The top Indonesians male and female full-marathon runners each took home US$3,500 while the 2nd place Indonesian man and woman full-marathon finishers earned US$2,000.

Half-Marathon Open Division
The first-place winner in the men’s division of the half-marathon was Luke Kilbet at 1:05:49. Second place went to Polycarp Mogusu at 1:05:52 and third to Josphet Kiptanui Too Chobei at 1:08:34.

The first-place women’s finisher in the half-marathon was Eunice Nyawira Mochiri; second Elizabeth Chepkanan Janan Rumoko at 1:15:03 and third for Esther Wamboi Karimo at 1:16:22.

Winners in the Hal-Marathon men and women’s division were all Kenyans. Prizes for first, second and third in both the men’s and women’s division earned respectively US$10,000, US$5,000 and US$2,500.

Half-Marathon Indonesian Winners
Indonesia runners turned in time sufficiently close to the fastest pace to encourage speculation that Indonesian runners will soon be winning international honors in marathon events.

In the men’s division Agus Prayogo came in first (1:11:26), Juahari John second (1:12:43) and third went to Kristianus Ore Rato (1:14:39).

Indonesian women in the half-marathon saw Triyaninsig come in first (1:18:05), Yanita Sari second (1:28:30) and Siti Khodijah third (1:34:18)

First, second and third place Indonesian finishers, both male and female, respectively won US$1,000, US$800 and US$700.

10-Kilometer Open Division
man, Onsesmus Muasya won top honors in the 10-km race with a time of 30:35. Second went to an Australian Thomas Do Canto with a time of 30:38 while third went to Kenyan David Mutai running 31:08.

In the women’s division, three Kenyan swept all thee top places. Alice Kabura Njorge won first at 36:51, Ann Mukuhi Njohoa second at 36:53 and Irine Jeptoo Kipchumba won third at 37:29.

First, second and third place in both divisions won US$2,500, US$1,500 and US$1.000 respectively.

10-Kilometer Indonesian Division
nesian men finishers in the 10 km race were Ridwan (32:43), Feri Junaedi (33:39) and Samgar Kamlasi (34:48).

Top Indonesian women finishers in the 10 km race were Uilianingsih (37:32), Rini Budiarti (38:06) and Olivia Sadi (38:35).

The prizes for each the men and women’s division were US$700, US$600 and US$500.

Bali Discovery Events provided sporting event management services for the BII Maybank Bali Marathon.


Letís Get Animated!
Gorillaz Party Set for Garuda Wisnu Kencana in Bali on Wednesday, May 9, 2012. Tickets Now on Sale!

Promoted as the World’s largest Audio-Visual performance, Gorillaz Sound System will visit Bali’s Garuda Wisnu Kencana Park on Wednesday, May 9, 2012.
of-the-art audio-visual 4-man show will present the hits made famous by Gorillaz pumped out on a monster sound systems and images projected on super-sized screens.

More party than concert, the evening will be divided into two area of non-stop entertainment, both accessible by all ticket holders.

Area One
  • Gorillaz Sound System
  • Kelis
  • James Zabiela
  • George Fitzgerald
  • Marc Roberts
  • Mahesa Utara

Areas Two
  • The Silent Disco DJs featuring:
  • Mikey Moran
  • Stan, Schizo
  • Downey
  • Gary Bemore
  • Mistral
  • Adith Putra
  • Kent Kryptonite
  • James Hendrik
  • Eric Larson
  • Ronny Be Good
  • Putra Collins
  • Dion
  • Chris
  • Anastasia
  • Yoga Yin
  • Jeime Charter
  • Shumi
  • Robotrock
  • Ye
  • Kasimyn
  • Alex Joy
  • Dunie 

The event will also feature a "Silent Disco" equipped  with five hundred wireless headphones with selector switches to select from three different DJs playing simultaneously. Each headphones features three different light colors indicating the DJ you are currently listening to. Find someone dancing with the same color selection as you own and you'll soon be dancing to the music of the same beat box.

Gorillaz Sound System

Gorillaz Sound System was first created in 1998, promoting Gorillaz music portraying an alternate universe where a “virtual band” of cartoon characters perform. Imagery and sound tracks are augmented by live performance by a vocalists, keyboardists, guitarists and percussionist.

The music is free-flowing and touches a wide-range of genres from including alternative, rock, hip hop, electronica, dub and pop.

Doors open at 5 pm on Thursday, May 9, 2012 with tickets costing Rp. 360,000 (US$40).

Tickets at the door cost Rp. 420,000 (US47)

Tickets are available from Bali Discovery Events at Telephone ++62-(0)361-286283.

For ticket [Email]


 
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Bali Update #587
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Bali Update #586
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Bali Update #585
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Bali Update #584
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Bali Update #583
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Bali Update #582
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Bali Update #581
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Bali Update #580
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Bali Update #579
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Bali Update #578
October 08, 2007

Bali Update #577
October 01, 2007

Bali Update #576
September 24, 2007

Bali Update #575
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Bali Update #574
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Bali Update #573
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Bali Update #572
August 27, 2007

Bali Update #571
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Bali Update #570
August 13, 2007

Bali Update #569
August 06, 2007

Bali Update #568
July 30, 2007

Bali Update #567
July 23, 2007

Bali Update #566
July 16, 2007

Bali Update #565
July 09, 2007

Bali Update #564
July 02, 2007

Bali Update #563
June 25, 2007

Bali Update #562
June 18, 2007

Bali Update #561
June 11, 2007

Bali Update #560
June 04, 2007

Bali Update #559
May 28, 2007

Bali Update #558
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Bali Update #557
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Bali Update #556
May 07, 2007

Bali Update #555
April 30, 2007

Bali Update #554
April 23, 2007

Bali Update #553
April 16, 2007

Bali Update #552
April 09, 2007

Bali Update #551
April 02, 2007

Bali Update #550
March 26, 2007

Bali Update #549
March 19, 2007

Bali Update #548
March 12, 2007

Bali Update #547
March 05, 2007

Bali Update #546
February 26, 2007

Bali Update #545
February 19, 2007

Bali Update #544
February 12, 2007

Bali Update #543
February 05, 2007

Bali Update #542
January 29, 2007

Bali Update #541
January 22, 2007

Bali Update #540
January 15, 2007

Bali Update #539
January 08, 2007

Bali Update #538
January 01, 2007

Bali Update #537
December 25, 2006

Bali Update #536
December 18, 2006

Bali Update #535
December 11, 2006

Bali Update #534
December 04, 2006

Bali Update #533
November 27, 2006

Bali Update #532
November 20, 2006

Bali Update #531
November 13, 2006

Bali Update #530
November 06, 2006

Bali Update #529
October 30, 2006

Bali Update #528
October 23, 2006

Bali Update #527
October 16, 2006

Bali Update #526
October 9, 2006

Bali Update #525
October 2, 2006

Bali Update #524
September 04, 2006

Bali Update #523
September 04, 2006

Bali Update #522
September 04, 2006

Bali Update #521
September 04, 2006

Bali Update #520
August 28, 2006

Bali Update #519
August 21, 2006

Bali Update #518
August 14, 2006

Bali Update #517
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Bali Update #516
July 31, 2006

Bali Update #515
July 24, 2006

Bali Update #514
July 17, 2006

Bali Update #513
July 10, 2006

Bali Update #512
July 03, 2006

Bali Update #511
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Bali Update #510
June 19, 2006

Bali Update #509
June 12, 2006

Bali Update #508
June 05, 2006

Bali Update #507
May 29, 2006

Bali Update #506
May 22, 2006

Bali Update #505
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Bali Update #504
May 08, 2006

Bali Update #503
May 01, 2006

Bali Update #502
April 24, 2006

Bali Update #501
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